Since last decade, it's been White House tradition that the press secretary typically calls on an Associated Press reporter to ask the first question at briefings. Trump administration Press Secretary Sean Spicer has not selected AP for the first question at either of his first two briefings, and numerous press outlets have noted that avoidance. It's more than fair to ask, given the tone of the AP's Trump administration coverage so far this week, whether the wire service's reporters are now carrying a horribly unprofessional grudge, causing them to become even more hostile in their reporting than they were during the 2016 election campaign and the presidential transition. (Update, Jan. 26: They definitely are.)



At the end of the panel discussion on the most recent Fox News Sunday, host Chris Wallace asked the Associated Press's Julie Pace how big of a deal she thought President-Elect Donald Trump's "transparency" in moving away from direct involvement in his business interests would be.

Her answer came across to me as self-important, given that she basically said that the she and the press were going to consistently report on it "whether they (the public) care about it or not." Wallace appeared to react similarly. His response to her answer was delicious, especially because it ended the segment: "I think Donald Trump's going to determine his own interests, not Julie Pace." Ouch.



At Wednesday's White House press briefing, Obama administration Press Secretary Josh Earnest, in a fit of completely unsupported arrogance, claimed that 805,000 jobs have been created "while President Obama was in office," and that "President Obama has set a high standard" in that regard.

The lazy stenographers posing as journalists present at the briefing, along with other reporters covering Carrier Corp.'s decision not to move its Indianapolis manufacturing jobs to Mexico, have failed to recognize what anyone whose job it has been to follow the economy during the Obama administration should know, namely that the economy, through October 2016, has fewer manufacturing jobs now than it did when President Obama took office in January 2009.



The Associated Press and reporter Josh Lederman are feeling sorry for outgoing President Barack Obama. Shortly after 9 a.m. on Saturday morning, in advance of Obama's last foreign tour, the AP's headline at Lederman's dispatch read: "On last foreign tour, Obama must find a way to explain Trump."

Lederman wrote that our poor, put-upon president "must pivot and reassure the U.S. and other countries that somehow, it will all be OK." It's almost as if he needs to provide "safe spaces" on Air Force One for grieving foreign snowflakes who are apparently having as hard a time accepting reality as many U.S. college students.



A search at the Associated Press's main national site on "Podesta Iran" (not in quotes) returns no items relating to a Wikileaks-released email exposing how Hillary Clinton 2016 campaign manager John Podesta agreed with a Republican senator in July 2015 that the deal which had been "negotiated" by the Obama administration with Iran would lead to "a nuclear war in the Persian Gulf." (The word "negotiated" is in quotes because, other than releasing hostages it never should have captured or held, Iran appears not to have given up anything.)



Though they haven't yet completed covering things up, Hillary Clinton's journalistic defense team at the Associated Press has swung into gear at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

The headline at the wire service's 10:00 p.m. Monday evening story by reporters Julie Pace and Ken Thomas — "AFTER DISPUTES, DEM STARS TURN THEIR CONVENTION POSITIVE" — falsely told readers that the contentiousness was over. Far from it. The pair's cleanup isn't complete yet (I expect we'll see that by early Tuesday morning), because their early paragraphs still betray the widely-reported disarray which occurred throughout the day. Pace and Thomas also need to work on their hearing, because they're claiming that a chant which became popular at the Republican convention last week relating to Hillary Clinton — "Lock her up!" — hasn't been heard in Philadelphia. They're wrong.



American Urban Radio Networks White House correspondent April Ryan participated in the Friday edition of the Fox News Channel’s (FNC) Special Report and lamented the burdens that were placed on President Obama due to his race and complained that “every time he speaks about anything on race, the right comes up and jumps him.”



Though their report covering Donald Trump's Wednesday speech criticizing presumptive Democratic Party nominee Hillary Clinton's record has undergone subsequent revisions, the coverage of that speech by the Associated Press's Julie Pace and Jill Colvin has stuck with two common themes. One is that prospective Republican nominee Donald Trump has "struggled with the transition to a general election race, getting bogged down by self-created controversies." The fact is that the "controversies," especially the one over Trump supposedly claiming that President Barack Obama was, in media-speak, "involved" with the June 13 terrorist massacre of 49 in Orlando, Florida, are almost entirely press-invented creations and distortions of what Trump has actually said.

The other AP theme which has survived frequent revisions is the idea that criticisms of Hillary Clinton, especially if made by Trump or other opponents, can be readily flicked away if they have been "widely questioned," meaning in practice that a few Clinton acolytes can merely say that "these people are wrong," and that's the end of it. The double standard could hardly be more blatant.



On Fox News shortly after Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's foreign policy speech today, former United Nations Ambassador John Bolton evaluated what the GOP frontrunner had to say about Iran's efforts to develop nuclear weapons.

He also stated the inconvenient truth about the Obama administration's nuclear "deal" with Iran, namely that it puts the jihad-driven, terrorist-funding, death-to-America nation "on a highway to nuclear weapons" — a reality that the Barack Obama-defending press simply won't admit, at least partially because elements of the press, particularly alleged "journalists" at the Associated Press, helped clear the route for that highway:



At Politico tonight, the headline is: "Sanders crushes Clinton in Wisconsin." Given Mrs. Clinton's frontrunner status and the fact that, as the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel noted on Saturday (HT Ann Althouse), "Wisconsin has a nearly unbroken modern-day record of voting for party front-runners in its presidential primary," that's an accurate characterization of Sanders' 12-point lead over Mrs. Clinton with over two-thirds of the votes counted at the time of this post.

Politico's subheadline: "He’s won seven of the past eight contests, but will it matter?" That's a fair question, given the anti-democratic situation with superdelegates in the Democratic Party. It's also an assessment based on the fact that much of the rest of the establishment press has been determined to write off Sanders' recent resurgence, including tonight's win, as likely irrelevant.



NPR's Mara Liasson went after ABC News on Fox News Channel's Special Report on Friday over their decision to not invite Carly Fiorina to their upcoming Republican presidential debate: "It's inexplicable. I don't know how they can stand up and explain why the only woman in the race — who placed above some of the people who are on the stage and has a delegate — is not there. I can't even imagine...what the explanation would be."



The Wall Street Journal ran a blockbuster story Tuesday afternoon ("U.S. Spy Net on Israel Snares Congress") about how the Obama administration's National Security Agency's "targeting of Israeli leaders swept up the content of private conversations with U.S. lawmakers." In other words, the NSA spied on Congress. As talk-show host and commentator Erick Erickson drily observed: "Congress began impeachment proceedings on Richard Nixon for spying on the opposing political party."

Whether or not Congress has the nerve to defend itself and the Constitution's separation of powers, what the Journal reported is objectively a major story. Yet the Associated Press ignored it on Tuesday, and most of Wednesday. Finally, at 7:15 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesday, the AP ran a story by Erica Werner — about how Republicans are planning to investigate the matter.