The panel on Reliable Sources Sunday included the typical criticism of President Trump that one would associate with CNN programming. However, one of the panelists, perhaps unintentionally, admitted an unspeakable truth that a “pipeline” exists between “progressive ideas and mainstream journalists.”



CNN is ready to push Big Tech into banning President Donald Trump -- as a “dangerous” person. Facebook and Instagram banned six individuals and all links to conspiracy website InfoWars as “dangerous” last week.



Irin Carmon, a former Washington Post contributor and fierce abortion supporter, found a novel angle from which to attack the urprise hit pro-life movie Unplanned, “A Hit Anti-Abortion Film Is Inspiring Real-World Harassment.” No, it isn’t -- and if it is, Carmon failed to present any evidence to support that headline under her story for New York magazine’s “Cut." Carmon relied on other left-wing journalists to make her case and to assure readers Johnson was lying



The Washington Post deserved credit for daring to report on another national media outlet when they outed the sexually aggressive behavior of CBS (and PBS) anchor Charlie Rose in November 2017. But Irin Carmon, a freelance reporter on that story alongside Post reporter Amy Brittain, is now spilling the beans in New York magazine on how the Post buckled on a follow-up story in 2018 on 60 Minutes executive producer (and former CBS News chairman) Jeff Fager. The headline is "What Was the Washington Post Afraid Of?"



"Advocates for abortion rights don’t get a lot of good news, but Wednesday brought some," MSNBC.com's Irin Carmon gleefully opened her March 30 story, "FDA move could radically transform abortion access."



During Sunday morning's MSNBC live coverage of the passing of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, host Ari Melber and correspondent Irin Carmon waded into going negative against the conservative justice as the two brought up those who viewed him as "cold" toward people who have been "historically oppressed" in spite of his pleasant personality.



Just as the liberal media greet Antonin Scalia as some sort of Supreme Court supervillain, they lionize Ruth Bader Ginsburg as a superhero. A gushy new book spinning off of the Internet meme of the “Notorious RBG” is making a splash in the liberal media. The New York Times hailed it as “an artisanal hagiography, a frank and admiring piece of fan nonfiction.” On Monday night’s All Things Considered, NPR court reporter Nina Totenberg filed a completely one-sided promotional segment on the liberal “fan nonfiction.”



On Tuesday’s MSNBC Live with Thomas Roberts, fill-in anchor Frances Rivera eagerly promoted Planned Parenthood attacking Republicans: “Planned Parenthood is going on the offensive, releasing ads in four states targeting these senators, urging supporters to tell them not to shut down the government to defund Planned Parenthood.”



MSNBC’s online coverage of Scott Walker’s new 20-week abortion ban is about as biased as they come. The story was featured with a screen-filling headline which boldly stated “WALKER BANS CHOICE.” This blatant attempt to slam Walker was eventually changed to “NO CHOICE,” omitting the Republican hopeful’s name.



Back in 2013 and 2014, MSNBC did their darndest to promote and, well, elect Wendy Davis. That didn't go over well, but the abortion-rights enthusiast has set about on a new project. So naturally MSNBC.com's own Irin Carmon -- a former "Champion of Choice" laureate -- caught up with the former Texas state senator and published an exclusive at MSNBC.com today headlined "Wendy Davis to start new women's organization."



On Thursday's All In With Chris Hayes, MSNBC's Irin Carmon bewailed the apparent inevitability that the Republican-led Congress would reintroduce a proposed ban on abortions after the twentieth week of pregnancy: "I think even if this bill were to come back and it would have a broader rape exception, it would still be an attack on all of the women who need abortions after twenty weeks."



Covering Phi Kappa Psi's reinstatement at UVa., MSNBC.com's Irin Carmon steadfastly refused to describe the Rolling Stone story which dragged the fraternity through the mud as a "discredited" story.

Although Charlottesville police investigated and found no evidence whatsoever to substantiate that a gang rape occurred in the Phi Kappa Psi house back in September 2012, as alleged in Sabrina Rubin Erdeley's story, Carmon describes Erdeley's article as merely "disputed" in points of fact rather than thoroughly "discredited":