On the Fox Business Network on Tuesday, Happening Now host Melissa Francis would not let her Democratic Party guest get away with refusing to answer her question about tax reform. Eventually, she goaded former Clinton adviser Simon Rosenberg into acknowledging that he was refusing to answer her question (then why did he appear in what he knew was a discussion segment?); when she wouldn't move on without getting one, he promised that "I’m never coming back on this show ever again." Boo hoo.



A month ago, I noted that the establishment press has ignored an especially pernicious program undertaken by Eric Holder's Department of Justice and the Obama administration's regulatory apparatus, namely Operation Choke Point.

On Thursday, a strong 321-87 bipartisan majority of the House passed H.R. 4660, the "Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act (of) 2015." Among its provisions: "Sec. 554. None of the funds made available in this Act may be used to carry out Operation Choke Point." The final bill's supporters included 204 Republicans and 117 Democrats. The establishment press has ignored the vote. Excerpts from Kelly Riddell's Friday coverage at the Washington Times follows the jump (bolds are mine throughout this post):



A Virginia businessman has been convicted of violating Washington, D.C. gun laws for possessing what amounts to, wait for it, replica musket balls. For that he was sentenced to time served, fined $50, and forced to enroll in the District's gun-offender registry.

Emily Miller has the story this afternoon at WashingtonTimes.com  (emphasis mine):



The same Washington, D.C., prosecutor who refused to press charges against NBC's David Gregory for violating -- on national TV no less -- a District law banning "high-capacity" ammunition magazines is gunning for a private citizen, throwing the book at him for possessing, wait for it.... ONE shotgun shell. Oh, and, by the way, it was a SPENT shotgun shell.

The Washington Times's Emily Miller has the story here. You can read an excerpt below the page break (emphasis mine):



 

Pro-Second Amendment author Emily Miller appeared on CNN and dismantled a gun control guest. CNN Newsroom anchor Brooke Baldwin talked to Arkadi Gerney of the liberal Center for American Progress and Miller about the announcement that powerful studio mogul Harvey Weinstein plans an attack film on the NRA.

Gerney lectured, "Emily is wrong when she said there isn't evidence that gun laws lead to reducing gun violence." Miller shot back, "Name one then...Name one." Gerney replied, "If you compare that to the ten states with the weakest gun laws in the country, you see gun deaths that are half, half the gun deaths in those states." When asked to prove it, Gerney offered himself as a source: "That's a report that I wrote and published last year on the website for the Center for American Progress."Miller zinged, "Oh, it's yourself. Oh, okay, so you're a leftist organization and your own information." [See video below. MP3 audio here.]



ObamaCare boosters in Colorado are treating young women "cheap sluts who don’t care about their health or well being other than getting cheap birth control pills to have sex with strange men," complains Washington Times opinion writer Emily Miller in a November 12 post at the newspaper's website.

"The latest marketing campaign implies that young women would only be interested in Colorado's government-run health care exchange if they get coverage for birth control pills to have sex with strange men," Miller noted, going on to describe what she considers the "most offensive ad" [see below page break for illustration] which...:



At the New York Times on Tuesday, Michael S. Schmidt claimed that "The suspect in the killing of 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard on Monday test-fired an AR-15 assault rifle at a Virginia gun store last week but was stopped from buying one because state law there prohibits the sale of such weapons to out-of-state buyers, according to two senior law enforcement officials."

The portion of that statement about being "stopped from buying" an AR-15 isn't true, writes Emily Miller at the Washington Times, not only because "state law" wouldn't have prevented such an attempt, but also because Aaron Alexis didn't even try to buy one. Miller asserts that the New York Times "should issue a correction immediately." She also decries the establishment media's "obsession" with tying the AR-15 to the Navy Yard shooting (bolds are mine throughout this post):



When a major journalist breaks a gun law in the nation's capital on national TV in front of hundreds of thousands of viewers at home, you'd think it would be pretty much an open-and-shut case to prosecute. But when Meet the Press host David Gregory did just that last December -- displaying on-air an empty 30-round magazine during an interview segment with the NRA's Wayne LaPierre -- he got off scot-free when the District of Columbia failed to prosecute. The relevant law on the books in the nation's capital calls for a $1,000 fine and a year in prison for any civilian who possesses a ammunition magazine that can hold more than 10 rounds.

Two months later, annoyed with the District of Columbia for failing to answer her questions pertaining to the case, pro-gun rights opinion columnist Emily Miller of the Washington Times filed a freedom of information request. On Friday, Miller updated readers by noting how the District has been stringing her and other conservative bloggers along when it came to producing documents related to the Gregory investigation (emphasis mine):



Note to Piers Morgan: Journalism isn't rocket science and making a few phone calls can go a long way.

Giddy about a Newtown search warrant that showed there was an NRA certificate found in the Lanza household,  Morgan tweeted giddily: 

Yet, this is an abject lie.



While the liberal news media have been trumpeting Mayor Michael Bloomberg's new $12-million ad buy as an attempt to push federal gun control legislation, a glaring irony of one such ad is being ignored by the media: an actor in a Mayors Against Illegal Guns ad entitled "Responsible" is handling a shotgun in an irresponsible manner, violating three cardinal rules of gun safety.

Washington Times senior opinion editor and gun aficionada Emily Miller explains (emphases mine):



While many in the media have defended David Gregory's violation of the District of Columbia's strict gun laws when he held up a 30-round magazine during a December 23 Meet the Press interview, the Washington Post's Mike DeBonis is taking things a step further, insisting we don't know for certain whether Gregory held up an actual magazine or just something that "appeared" to look like one.

From DeBonis's page B3 January 10 story (emphases mine):