The "fact checkers" at Associated Press were the latest to fulminate against President Trump mocking Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam about executing babies born alive after an abortion attempt. The tweet was mockable: "The reality behind President Trump's false accusation that abortion doctors execute babies." Apparently, abortion doctors just kill....germs? Cellular clumps? 



On Wednesday, Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and David Crary of the Associated Press hyped that the "the Trump administration is remaking government policy on reproductive health — moving to limit access to birth control and abortion." The pair spotlighted how "social and religious conservatives praise the administration,'" but failed to give an ideological label for the "women's-rights activists...[who] view the multi-pronged changes as a dangerous ideological shift." The journalists also slanted towards the pro-abortion side by quoting six critics of the Trump policy shift, versus just three supporters.



AP's David Crary filed a slanted report on Thursday that spotlighted the complaints of left-wing organizations regarding hate crime laws that, in their view, are "rarely used to prosecute the slayings" of "transgender" individuals. Crary zeroed in on a murder case in Missouri where " a transgender teen...was stabbed in the genitals." He used the homicide as a jumping-off point to cite several activists, who bemoaned that the "[hate crime] provisions have led to few prosecutions."



Evidence that leftist bias has deeply infected local and regional news coverage arrived in the form of the "Top Stories of 2016" poll results at the Associated Press last week. In an exercise performed since 1936, the AP's "annual poll of U.S. editors and news directors" asked participants to identify the top 10 stories of 2016. "Black Men Killed by Police," referring to the controversial killings of two black men by non-black cops, made it to Number 3. "Attacks on Police" (note: not "Murders of Police"), which took "at least 20 lives," only got to Number 6. Rising crime in the U.S., including an increase exceeding 50 percent in homicides in Chicago, didn't make the list, and appears not to have even been a close runner-up.



Earlier today, Katie Yoder at NewsBusters posted and described the latest video from the Center for Medical Progress on Planned Parenthood's late-term abortion business and its related ghoulish work in harvesting fetal tissue from abortions for research.

Yoder's work and that CMP video caused me to remember how the Associated Press wrote up Planned Parenthood's announcement that it would cease taking compensation for fetal tissue harvesting on October 13.



Establishment press reporting has all too often been about perpetuating a narrative, even long after it has been proven false, than conveying facts and truth. Anyone arguing that 2014 has been one of the worst years ever for this growing trend won't get an argument here.

An Associated Press poll about the top stories of the year got responses from 85 editors at subscribing AP outlets. Although the top story named wasn't a surprise (disappointing, yes; surprise, no), the way the AP's David Crary wrote it up to support the proven-false "Hands up, don't shoot!" narrative on Monday was absolutely outrageous (bolds and numbered tags):



After the libertine left howled that that the Associated Press decided not to use routinely the word "homophobia," it's not surprising the same people are upset that AP stylebook sultans would rule that "husband" and "wife" should not be used routinely to describe "gay marriages." The Huffington Post apparently can't read. They call this a "ban."

But the real fever swamp is at Gawker, where the radicals imagine that the "bizarre" AP is somehow like segregationists:



Poor Associated Press National Writer David Crary. He doesn't seem to like what LiveAction.org did at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Perth Amboy, New Jersey in mid-January, and wants to make sure his readers leave his writeup with some level of doubt about the legitimacy of the group's undercover video showing a clinic manager willing to provide assistance to a pimp for his underage hookers.

His report yesterday, with an accompanying headline seemingly designed to avoid identifying the video's content opened thusly (bold is mine):



Tebow

The story behind Heisman Trophy winner Tim Tebow's arrival into this world is remarkable.

So-called "women's groups" would seem to prefer that as many Americans as possible not know the story about the courageous and faith-based decision Tebow's mother made to carry her pregnancy to term. That's the only plausible reason why they are opposing a 30-second Focus on the Family (FOTF) ad scheduled to air during the Super Bowl. So far, it seems that CBS, which will air the Super Bowl on February 7, seems disinclined to buckle.

David Crary's coverage of the story at the Associated Press (from which the photo at the top right was obtained) labels FOTF "conservative," but does not apply any descriptive label to the "women's groups" objecting to the ad.

As you'll see in the final excerpted paragraph, Crary's coverage included an over-the-top statement from the objectors:



Reporters at the Associated Press are clearly unhappy that Maine voters turned out to refuse to honor "gay marriage" at the ballot box.



Associated Press reporter David Crary reported on Wednesday that the American Psychological Association voted 125 to 4 to repudiate "reparative therapy" to reorient homosexuals as unscientific and even harmful. But that was a more balanced vote than the AP article that appeared in many papers and websites, in which Crary couldn't find a single conservative voice -- even if the losing opinion was repeatedly identified as conservative, and the winning side drew no label at all.