On his Wednesday evening Fox News show, Tucker Carlson scorched MSNBC's Joy Reid, described at the New York Times in February as a "Heroine of the Resistance," for claiming that 12 year-old posts at her now-defunct blog were somehow retroactively hacked to make her look even more bigoted against homosexual behavior than the posts she admitted to writing in 2007-2009 back in December.



Wednesday afternoon, MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow gave an interview to the Associated Press defending her actions following her epic fail regarding the tease and reveal of President Trump’s 2005 tax returns by blaming viewers for overblowing the revelation. 



Associated Press media reporter David Bauder wrote a story Tuesday that overwhelmingly praised CBS Evening News anchor Scott Pelley for being a “blunt evaluator” of President Trump. Most of the story channels the bizarre idea that these blunt evaluations are somehow not the opposite of an objective method. The lowest point is this completely untrue and unhistorical comment by former CNN reporter Mark Feldstein: "It's striking because it's such a departure from the traditional norm of objectivity that serious news anchors have always gone for over the last few generations."



One of the more amusing yet pathetic spectacles of the Trump administration’s early weeks — the ongoing establishment press fury at the richly deserved lack of respect it is getting from the President and his press secretary — neared meltdown yesterday. This occurred because Donald Trump wasn't asked a question everyone knew he wouldn't answer if asked about Michael Flynn at a joint press conference with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau. On Monday, Scott Whitlock at NewsBusters covered the joint temper tantrum/pity party at MSNBC in which Brian Williams — that's right, "Mr. Madeup Stories" himself — and Katy Tur engaged. CNN, CNN.com, the Washington Post, the New York Times, the Associated Press and others joined the roster of not so fine whiners.

 



In the course of presenting what is apparently one story in a series of several on a "Divided America," David Bauder at the Associated Press portrayed two Americans with largely different news consumption habits. Though the theme of Bauder's Thursday morning report was about how Americans are "retreat(ing) into tribes of like-minded people who get news filtered through particular world views," the two people he presented "don't rely exclusively on partisan media," and go elsewhere "to hear opposing viewpoints." This essentially contradicted his attempted primary point, which is that Americans are supposedly, as his story's headline reads, "Constructing our own intellectual ghettos."



The press has consumed many barrels of ink and gigs of bandwidth providing free promotion for the eminently misnamed movie Truth, thus far virtually for naught.

On Thursday, the Associated Press's David Bauder did his part to generate interest by pretending, despite obviously forged documents and a virtually complete lack of anything resembling corroborating evidence, that what Dan Rather and Mary Mapes reported in 2004 about George W. Bush's Texas Air National Guard service might, as those two miscreants formerly employed by CBS still insist, be accurate.



Friday morning, Kyle Drennen at NewsBusters covered retiring Face the Nation host Bob Schieffer's appearance on CBS This Morning. Schieffer went into the same predictable whines seemingly every retiring establishment press reporter does as they're about to leave: there's too much money in politics, we can't control the news like we used to, congressional gridlock has never been worse, blah-blah-blah.

One other peculiar item, gleaned from David Bauder's Associated Press report on his own interview with Schieffer, needs to be noted before the CBS reporter rides into the sunset (possibly interrupted from time to time, as Bauder noted, by "some elder statesman role").



New Republic staff writer Elizabeth Stoker Bruenig has clearly run out of defenses for the conduct of those involved in the disgraceful, scandalous journalistic malpractice which gave rise to the now-retracted and thoroughly discredited "A Rape on Campus: The Struggle for Justice at UVA" at Rolling Stone.

So here's her last refuge: Conservatism deserves some of the blame, because Sabrina Rubin Erdely and others associated with the story supposedly "Used Rightwing Tactics to Make a Leftist Point" (links are in original; bolds and numbered tags are mine):



Maybe the left needs to rethink their oft-present and deep-seated hatred of all things associated with Comcast, other cable companies, and the satellite TV providers. It turns out that those "evil" entities have done quite a bit to cushion left-leaning CNN and MSNBC from what would otherwise be a harsh financial reality.

The Associated Press's David Bauder, in an item which somehow was deemed to be deserving of "Big Story" status, essentially acknowledged that in his Sunday afternoon review of the cratering and chaotic situation at MSNBC when he gave an overview of how the cable news channels' revenues shake out.



If Brian Williams or any of the executives at NBC thought that the controversy over his "fake Iraq story" might start to die down, developments this evening have proven that they were sadly mistaken.

The quoted words in the previous sentence are from a headline at an Associated Press story by David Bauder, the wire service's TV writer. The fact that the nation's self-described "essential global news network" felt comfortable using those words to describe the 12 year-old saga of Williams's fabricated adventure in Iraq is actually among the least of his and his network's troubles tonight. Two major stories at the New York Post's Page Six appear to have made their continuing with the status quo very difficult to imagine.



On Monday, the AP's David Bauder spotlighted the ongoing controversy over NBC's Dr. Nancy Snyderman breaking her own quarantine, after she returned from West Africa to cover the Ebola outbreak. Bauder underlined that Synderman's "the troubles clearly aren't over for NBC News' chief medical editor," and added that "NBC must now decide whether Snyderman's credibility is too damaged for her to continue reporting on Ebola or other medical issues."



The notion that MSNBC is now the most controversial gaffe-a-minute cable news network has been ratified by the Associated Press. AP media reporter David Bauder wrote a story headlined “Loose lips give ammunition to MSNBC foes.”

“Since MSNBC is in the political ring, its opponents are always on the lookout for things to attack,” Bauder wrote. “Lately, NBC's left-leaning cable news sister has offered plenty of ammunition.”