Into a discussion about the treatment of the bodies of aborted and miscarried babies, the Washington Post brought an obnoxiously flippant parody piece purporting to support funerals for sperm. In other words, presenting us with an apple and saying, "This is a banana."



Liberal Washington Post humorist Alexandra Petri did one of those modernist superiority dances on Saturday’s op-ed page. She started from the news that the Pew Research Center found we’re now choosing to live near people who share our beliefs, “enclaves of shared ideology.”

So when time travel comes online, conservatives will surely take the hint and move severely back into the B.C. time frame:



Don’t look now, but Washington Post humorist Alexandra Petri used her Saturday column to mock climate-change gloom and doom. It was titled “Antarctica's ice melt of doom: A primer.”

After describing the latest NASA report on the “unstoppable” ice melt in Antarctica, she even threw in creatures from H.P. Lovecraft horror stories in her Q&A satire:



The implied threat from the White House to Bob Woodward has thrown the liberal media for a loop. On Wednesday night, Politico published a fawning interview with Woodward. Writers Mike Allen and Jim VandeHei gushed over the "calm, instantly recognizable voice" of the journalist. On Wednesday, the Washington Post, which Woodward famously works for, mocked the Politico piece as nothing different than "fan fiction."

The Politico authors thrilled over being in the same room as Woodward. Allen and VandeHei's first paragraph raved, "Woodward [talked to] us in an hourlong interview yesterday around the Georgetown dining room table where so many generations of Washington’s powerful have spilled their secrets." A simple act of reading an e-mail became: "Digging into one of his famous folders, Woodward said the tirade was followed by a page-long email from the aide."



Early this morning, I noted how two AP writers seemed to be hoping that former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney will be the Republican Party's presidential nominee, in the process ignoring inconvenient facts like his failure to get over 25% in any poll covered at Real Clear Politics since mid-July while failing to even mention Herman Cain's name until the report's eleventh paragraph (a Rasmussen poll today breaks Romney's three-month dry spell, showing him at 29%, tied with Herman Cain). Sadly, what the AP writes is important for readers to know, because the wire service's copy is read and relayed without question by most of its thousands of subscribing outlets.

Not that learning about the following is anywhere near as important, but in case you're wondering about the GOP presidential nominee preferences and perceptions among several of the pundits at the Washington Post, wonder no more:



In her aptly-titled ComPost blog yesterday, Washington Post humorist Alexandra Petri defended pop star Christina Aguilera's botched rendition of the Star-Spangled Banner before Super Bowl XLV.

"She didn't botch the national anthem. Francis Scott Key did," Petri explained, griping that: