It can be useful and instructive to observe the turning of a decade by looking back on what life was like in America a mere 100 years ago. On Jan. 2, 1920, the Dow Jones Industrial Average was 108.76. Today it is over 28,000 points. In 1920, the U.S. had become an economic power, which is remarkable considering the bloody “war to end all wars” that ended just two years earlier. Republican presidents shifted their attention from foreign entanglements to economic growth (sound familiar?).



With all the traditional economic indicators looking strong heading into an election year the conventional wisdom would hold that this is good news for the incumbent. But since the incumbent is a Republican, MSNBC Live host Ali Velshi and CNBC's John Harwood declared on Friday that all is not well and implied that the current economic situation could give credence to Democratic policy priorities and help Democratic presidential candidates who are dramatically to the left.



It must be difficult for CNN to admit President Donald Trump’s economy is remarkable after their obsession over his impeachment. Their latest poll shows a stunning result even the liberal outlet felt compelled to concede. CNN reported on Dec. 20 that as the year 2019 closes, “the US economy earn[ed] its highest ratings in almost two decades” [emphasis added]. This, according to CNN, potentially boosts “President Donald Trump in matchups against the Democrats vying to face him in next year's election, according to a new CNN poll conducted by SSRS.”



Apologies to Elton John, but in Washington and throughout so much of the country, can you feel the hate tonight? House Speaker Nancy Pelosi was asked by reporter James Rosen if she hates President Trump. She responded with an “if looks could kill ” fire in her eyes and denounced Rosen for his question while claiming she doesn't hate Trump. Former Vice President Joe Biden verbally attacked and challenged an 83-year-old man in Iowa to a push-up contest at a gathering of Democrats.



While the liberal media continue their ongoing impeachment obsession, and with Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) directing her chairmen to draft articles of impeachment, the jobs market and stock market continue to steamroll along. “Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 266,000 in November, and the unemployment rate was little changed at 3.5 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today,” according to a Dec. 6 United States Bureau of Labor Statistics News Release.



This week, Paul Krugman of The New York Times posited a theory: Red states cause depression and suicide. In a column titled “America's Red State Death Trip,” Krugman wrote: “In 1990, today's red and blue states had almost the same life expectancy. Since then, however, life expectancy in Clinton states has risen more or less in line with other advanced countries, compared with almost no gain in Trump country. At this point, blue-state residents can expect to live more than four years longer than their red-state counterparts.”



On Tuesday afternoon's MSNBC Live, host Katy Tur surprisingly pressed Bernie Sanders's campaign manager from the right several times as she discussed economic policy with Faiz Shakir. As she brought up arguments that the candidate's plans to tax businesses and redistribute income would drive businesses to move to other countries, the MSNBC host either seemed like she's either finally decided to insert both sides of the issues into her show, or perhaps she's just secretly cheering for Elizabeth Warren or Joe Biden because they are perceived as more electable that Sanders.



Viewers tuning in to New Amsterdam to learn who died in the terrible ambulance accident from the spring finale will be shocked by the answers in the series premiere. What won’t shock them was that NBC’s medical drama was packed tighter with liberal views than the hospital’s emergency room was filled with patients. No change there from last season.



The Chairman and CEO of the Television Academy calls it the “platinum age of television.” Frank Scherma spoke about how connected television viewing makes friends and family as it is a shared experience. Mostly, though, these awards shows prove it is the platinum age of bloated egos and groupthink.



The lead National slot in Saturday’s New York Times was occupied by “Andrew Yang and the Passionate 2.6 Percent Lifting Him.” Reporter Matt Stevens hailed the low-polling 2020 Democrat’s plan to give $1000 a month to every American. A weirdly affectionate tone toward Yang pervaded Stevens’ piece, putting in mind his fulsome over the re-emergence of Texas politician Wendy Davis (aka “Abortion Barbie”) in July. 



The next recession could bring an economic “revolution,” according to left-wing New York Times tech columnist Farhad Manjoo. He argued that when it arrives it would be “time to go full Elizabeth Warren” because of inequality.

Insisting that “a recession looms,” Manjoo fueled envy against CEOs and the wealthy — the very kind of envy that could spur such a “revolution.” Although he attached Democratic candidate Warren’s name to that kind of “radical” change, spouting off about revolution calls to mind other names like Marx and Lenin.



Yes, it´s true. People over 55 years of age are prospering across the nation. But so are Latinos - and as one Hispanic investment ace tells us, they are not the only ones, much to the chagrin of the liberal Spanish-speaking media that continue to make a case for an ailing economy about to crash and for Donald Trump to be deep-sixed.