As of Monday morning, the Media Research Center and its grassroots members made over 25,000 calls lambasting ABC and demanding a full apology for anti-Christian comments made by The View on February 13 that suggested Vice President Mike Pence’s “dangerous” Christian faith was a “mental illness.”


HBO's Here and Now continues to try to set the gold standard for being the most obnoxiously woke show on television. In its premiere last week, we met the main family, the Bayer-Boatwrights, who are made up of an academic, some kind of a counselor (we will see more in this week's episode), and their children adopted from around the world in a show of how "progressive and evolved they are."


Thursday on ABC’s The View, the whole table addressed host Joy Behar’s mockery of Mike Pence’s Christian faith on Tuesday’s show that caused an uproar. Even though the rest of the table, with the exception of Meghan McCain and to some extent Whoopi Goldberg, also made vile comments, ABC only brought up Behar’s comments as controversial.

 

In addition to being anti-business, Comedy Central’s new show Corporate is also anti-religion. On Wednesday’s episode, Casual Friday, Hampton Deville’s CEO announces, “We all know there's no God, but there is a ton of money to be made in His name,” in anticipation of meeting with power/money-hungry Glorious Salvation Ministries representative Alyssa Armstrong. CEO Christian Deville meets with the cross-bearing representative of the largest group of mega-churches in the country to discuss how Hampton Deville will furnish them with flat screens, massage chairs, and snacks, in return for the corporation’s logo being broadcasted all over the churches. Or as Alyssa puts it, “Every time my congregants go to pray, they'll be thinking of the Father, Son, Holy Spirit, and Hampton f*cking Deville."


LifeSiteNews reported the Episcopal church in the diocese of Washington DC quickly passed a resolution to stop using "gendered language for God" at the Diocese's 123rd Convention. The resolution stated: “If revision of the Book of Common Prayer is authorized, to utilize expansive language for God from the rich sources of feminine, masculine, and non-binary imagery for God found in Scripture and tradition and, when possible, to avoid the use of gendered pronouns for God.” Somehow The Washington Post missed this vote for an "expansion" of God.


On Wednesday's Good Morning America, ABC correspondent Linsey Davis tried to link President Donald Trump to a controversial religious figure in a way that it is unlikely that the news show would do if it involved a Democratic President instead. Near the end of a report updating viewers on the unusually bad flu season, Davis showed video of evangelist Gloria Copeland suggesting that it was not necessary to get a flu shot, alleging that prayer could prevent the flu, before the ABC reporter identified her as "an advisor on the President's evangelical board."

 


For those of you tired of the disgusting sexual images from Fox’s The Mick, you’re in luck. In the latest episode you get disgusting comments ridiculing practiced religion and belief in God as a whole instead. It’s hardly a positive step forward, but at least there are no nude 100-year-olds.


At the top of Thursday’s NBC Today, co-host Hoda Kotb sounded the alarm about a new film in the works: “Is Mel Gibson planning a sequel to his most controversial and successful movie ever?” Later in the show, fellow co-host Savannah Guthrie gave more details as she similarly warned: “What we’re learning about Mel Gibson’s plan for a sequel to his most controversial movie ever, The Passion of the Christ.”


“Let everyone be subject to the governing authorities, for there is no authority except that which God has established. The authorities that exist have been established by God.” (Romans 13:1) That verse, written by Paul the Apostle, is one of the most difficult for modern evangelicals to fully accept. It was written at a time when the Roman authorities were bad dudes.


Last week, I mentioned that all did not bode well for traditional values in TNT’s latest series The Alienist, and the second episode already confirms my worst fears. We have gone from implying “progressive” behaviors to actually showing them in a way that has me giving up my faith in human decency. After all, it’s clear that The Alienist gave up on that a long time ago.


The NBC comedy Superstore spent their January 25 episode exploring the difference between things that are real, things that are imaginary, and things that were once real and are now extinct. The episode title "Angels and Mermaids" might give you a clue as to how they treat faith in those discussions. 


In an opinion piece published by the Louisville Courier-Journal, self-described “faith leader” Rev. Lauren Jones Mayfield expressed her support for legalized abortion and argued that she is aligning herself with “the oppressed.” Mayfield, who “is on the board of Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky,” said supporting legalized abortion coincides with her beliefs.