The next recession could bring an economic “revolution,” according to left-wing New York Times tech columnist Farhad Manjoo. He argued that when it arrives it would be “time to go full Elizabeth Warren” because of inequality.

Insisting that “a recession looms,” Manjoo fueled envy against CEOs and the wealthy — the very kind of envy that could spur such a “revolution.” Although he attached Democratic candidate Warren’s name to that kind of “radical” change, spouting off about revolution calls to mind other names like Marx and Lenin.



In a story for the New York Times front page Tuesday, “Shareholders Rule No More, C.E.O.s Pledge,” business reporters David Gelles and David Yaffe-Bellany conceded all the left-wing arguments about the evils of big business and roasted Nobel laureate free-market economist Milton Friedman as an avatar of greed: "This mind-set informed the corporate raiders of the 1980s and contributed to an unswerving focus on quarterly earnings reports. It found its way into pop culture, when in the 1987 movie “Wall Street,” Gordon Gekko declared, 'Greed is good.'"



Another day, another left-wing boycott of a company driven by social media users who can’t stand the President. The latest targets were fitness companies Equinox and SoulCycle, because billionaire owner Stephen Ross plans to host a fundraiser for President Donald Trump on Aug. 9. Ross also owns the Miami Dolphins.



Left-wing economist and columnist Paul Krugman attacked President Donald Trump’s tax cuts as “the biggest giveaway to other nations since the Marshall Plan” in his New York Times column July 25. He criticized Trump’s “hidden” program for sending about $40 billion a year to “wealthy foreign investors.” Forbes contributor and freelance journalist Simon Constable, who has written for many financial publications, wasn’t having any of it. He chided Krugman for getting hold of “the wrong stick entirely” regarding Trump’s corporate tax cuts. 



The third season of Veronica Mars aired on the CW in 2007 and now, 12 years later, Hulu has brought it back. I am what one might call a dedicated "Marshmallow" - a superfan of the titular teen detective who was equal parts sarcastic and hard-boiled. Imagine both my excitement when I found out the show was coming back and my abject disappointment when I found out that this fourth season was chock full of liberal nonsense.



Far-left candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren's (D-MA) latest plan to restructure the economy and regulate Wall Street came with a denouncement of private equity companies as “vampires.” MSNBC Live with Stephanie Ruhle boosted Warren’s so-called “economic patriotism” plan on July 18, but ignored that creepy insult. Nor did they discuss whether private equity firms are actually villains or being misrepresented by Warren. MSNBC anchor Stephanie Ruhle was practically grinning as she announced that Warren, whom she called “the candidate with a plan for everything,” was “out with another one, this time aimed at a very familiar target: Wall Street.” 



Fans of Netflix's Stranger Things might remember Erica Sinclair, Lucas' little sister who stole the show in season two. She's back in season three and an absolute American hero. Not only does she join the team to save the world from the Russians, she makes sure everyone understands that it's all about capitalism versus communism. 



JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon thinks President Donald Trump deserves “some” credit for the strong economy and that tax reform needed to happen, even though his “liberal New York friends would never agree.” On Yahoo Finance’s Influencers with Andy Serwer on June 27, Dimon applauded Trump’s pro-business economic agenda, especially tax cuts and deregulation. 



Left-wing Guardian columnist George Monbiot is often unhinged on climate issues. Now he’s blasted Royal Dutch Shell for extracting oil and gas that “will destroy our lives” and calling it a “planetary death machine.” Of course, his oil is evil attitude ignored all that the form of energy did to enable modern civilization’s existence and improve human life. 



Washington Post economic editorial writer Charles Lane called out proponents of socialism citing Nordic countries as a “model” for the kind of socialism they want to see replicated by America. Because, while they are “success stories,” they aren’t really the socialist utopias claimed by liberal presidential candidates like Sen. Bernie Sanders, (I-VT). Democratic socialist Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, (D-NY), has also claimed her policies “resemble” these countries.



President Donald Trump infuriated the left again on June 19, when he awarded supply-side economist Arthur Laffer the Presidential Medal of Freedom. The left’s reaction was predictably vicious. An MSNBC analyst called Laffer one of the most “destructive forces” in economics since Herbert Hoover. New York Magazine writer Jonathan Chait minced no words about his anger over Laffer’s award ceremony, calling him a “kook” elevated to “metaphysical status” within the Republican Party. He ridiculed Laffer’s theory as “provably untrue” and based on a “fake curve.”  



One of the left’s favorite economic talking points is an obsession with income and “wealth inequality.” In keeping with that trend, CNBC editor-at-large John Harwood offered five approaches to “fight” wealth inequality for the “economically helpless” on June 19. Most of those five proposals were liberal solutions including suggestions for taxing those at the top, imposing a higher minimum wage and spending on infrastructure. Harwood’s left-wing bias has been on display at CNBC for years.