On Monday's Amanpour and Company on PBS, host Christiane Amanpour gave liberal actress Jane Fonda a forum to promote her alarmist views on global warming, picking up on the veteran political activist's recent push to hold a weekly protest outside the U.S. Capitol on the issue. The liberal activist railed against the fossil fuel industry, fearmongered about there allegedly being only a decade left in which to cut carbon dioxide emissions, and complained that American "individualism" is a problem.



More than 30 years after President Ronald Reagan left office, MSNBC contributor Eddie Glaude on Sunday was still blaming him for modern economic problems during a discussion of the Democratic presidential race. On Up with David Gura, as Glaude gushed over Elizabeth Warren's performance in the last debate, he even claimed that Democrats have been "complicit" along with Republicans in implementing Reaganesque economic policy.



On Tuesday afternoon's MSNBC Live, host Katy Tur surprisingly pressed Bernie Sanders's campaign manager from the right several times as she discussed economic policy with Faiz Shakir. As she brought up arguments that the candidate's plans to tax businesses and redistribute income would drive businesses to move to other countries, the MSNBC host either seemed like she's either finally decided to insert both sides of the issues into her show, or perhaps she's just secretly cheering for Elizabeth Warren or Joe Biden because they are perceived as more electable that Sanders.



Mixed-ish just aired its second episode Tuesday and it continues to follow in the vein of the first episode-- anti-Reagan and full of wokeness.



On Friday's Real Time show, liberal comedian Bill Maher and his panel of mostly liberals promoted global warming alarmism with Commentary magazine's Noah Rothman as the only guest who argued against climate hysteria from a right-leaning point of view. Maher declared that climate change "deniers" who have children are "lousy parents" for not wanting to adopt left-wing proposals to react to climate change, and at one point, while complaining about Republicans "getting away with murder," was clearly also hinting at "murder" literally as he emphasized the word.



Viewers tuning in to New Amsterdam to learn who died in the terrible ambulance accident from the spring finale will be shocked by the answers in the series premiere. What won’t shock them was that NBC’s medical drama was packed tighter with liberal views than the hospital’s emergency room was filled with patients. No change there from last season.



Mixed-ish premiered on ABC Tuesday and it is about the childhood of Rainbow "Bow" Johnson, the mother in the hit television show Black-ish played by Tracee Ellis Ross. In what has become typical from ABC, the show features themes such as communistic sympathy, anti-conservative and anti-capitalism bias.



If politics is like a poker game, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-VT, just raised against Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-MA, by proposing a wealth tax scheme even more confiscatory than hers. Punishing the wealthy is the clear object of both plans. Sanders tweeted on Sept. 24, “Billionaires should not exist” as he promoted his wealth tax plan.



Paypal co-founder Max Levchin sat down with Yahoo! Finance editor-in-chief Andy Serwer to discuss his business experience and weigh in on many hot topics including socialism. He rejected progressive calls for “redistribution” from politicians like Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY).

During the Influencers episode released Sept. 5, Serwer asked Levchin what he thinks of Ocasio-Cortez and others “looking to address wealth and income inequality for example by raising taxes on rich people.”



The New York Times retains its bizarre obsession with the left-wing hobbyhorse of “income inequality.” Former economics reporter Binyamin Appelbaum, who betrayed liberal viewpoints in his reporting, is now free to issue unadulterated left-wing opinions from his perch on the paper’s editorial board. His latest Sunday Review piece suggests “Blame Economists for the Mess We’re In.” It began with a history lesson on how the government got over its distaste for economists in prominent positions, while getting off the paper’s latest mean-spirited crack at Nobel winning economist Milton Friedman.



An unexpected update of the classic Monopoly game sparked an argument between liberals and conservatives because it lampooned socialism. Hasbro’s new Monopoly Socialism board game spawned a viral Twitter argument as well as a defense from Sen. Ted Cruz, R-TX. The packaging calls it “a parody of the classic,” and says “winning is for capitalists” and “what’s yours is ours.” Rutgers history professor and Japan historian Nick Kapur called it “mean-spirited and woefully ill-informed” as he launched a series of tweets about the rules and language of the new version of the game.



The next recession could bring an economic “revolution,” according to left-wing New York Times tech columnist Farhad Manjoo. He argued that when it arrives it would be “time to go full Elizabeth Warren” because of inequality.

Insisting that “a recession looms,” Manjoo fueled envy against CEOs and the wealthy — the very kind of envy that could spur such a “revolution.” Although he attached Democratic candidate Warren’s name to that kind of “radical” change, spouting off about revolution calls to mind other names like Marx and Lenin.