While the liberal media continue their ongoing impeachment obsession, and with Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) directing her chairmen to draft articles of impeachment, the jobs market and stock market continue to steamroll along. “Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 266,000 in November, and the unemployment rate was little changed at 3.5 percent, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today,” according to a Dec. 6 United States Bureau of Labor Statistics News Release.



At this point, it’s no longer surprising that the liberal media aren’t willing to give President Donald Trump an inch of positive coverage, especially when approval trends shift in his favor. A new Dec. 2 report from CNBC revealed that “Sixty percent of small business owners approve of the way Donald Trump is handling his job as president.”



This week, Paul Krugman of The New York Times posited a theory: Red states cause depression and suicide. In a column titled “America's Red State Death Trip,” Krugman wrote: “In 1990, today's red and blue states had almost the same life expectancy. Since then, however, life expectancy in Clinton states has risen more or less in line with other advanced countries, compared with almost no gain in Trump country. At this point, blue-state residents can expect to live more than four years longer than their red-state counterparts.”



Another multimillionaire lefty celebrity is pining for the death of capitalism and for some good old wealth redistribution. Avengers superstar Mark Ruffalo demanded an “economic revolution” on Twitter this past Sunday, claiming that “capitalism is killing us, and robbing from our children’s future.”

 


Is a new story from liberal outlet The Washington Post another instance of the pot calling the kettle black? Liberal Washington Post columnist Margaret Sullivan decried liberal billionaire Michael Bloomberg’s 2020 candidacy in a Nov. 25 article headlined “Mike Bloomberg just stabbed the journalistic heart of his news organization.”



Liberals and the media love to hate billionaires -- but without them, where would the world be today? This Thanksgiving season, we can remember some of the contributions America’s billionaires have made to impact society. People like Charles and David Koch, Bernard Marcus and Frederick W. Smith are among a billionaire class of individuals that have drawn the ire of the liberal media and some Democratic Party presidential candidates, but little coverage is given to their extensive history of philanthropy.



On Monday's Morning Joe, Anand Giridharadas, who seems to be setting himself up to be the left's fiercest critic of Bloomberg, clashed with New York Times columnist and Bloomberg defender Bret Stephens. When Stephens said "this is America" and people like Bloomberg who develop good ideas can be richly rewarded, a thin-skinned Giridharadas shot back, "you don't need to tell me 'this is America.' I'm from America." Giridharadas also gave Stephens the old, "I let you finish," and offered to give him a copy of his new book, since to Giridharadas it seemed Stephens hadn't sufficiently absorbed its wisdom.



The New York Times conceded a crucial point that flies in the face of liberals who want to tax the ultra-rich and redistribute wealth.



Every once in a while, the liberal media is compelled to make a concession, even if it doesn’t serve their recession narrative. Liberal outlet Bloomberg News tweeted Nov. 17 that “The stock market seems to like Donald Trump more than any president since the 1950s,” and proceeded to place the president in fourth place behind former presidents Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Harry Truman and Dwight Eisenhower. 



One of the maddening acts of so-called "fact checking" is the arrogant attempt to predict future outcomes at election time. It should seem obvious this is beyond the territory of "facts." Now PolitiFact has slapped a "True" label on Elizabeth Warren's cost estimates for her socialist "Medicare for All" plan....even as it appends an "If true" disclaimer to it. 



The New York Times doesn’t just inject anti-capitalist and anti-conservative positions into its “news” coverage, but uses every section to make its arguments, concealed under the rubrics of Arts or Style. The Times is gleeful over the inevitable demise of capitalism, as demonstrated by an enraptured take by culture reporter Jennifer Schuessler of a hard-left satirical exhibit, “Museum of Capitalism."



The latest voice warning about the cost should Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) win the White House in 2020 is billionaire investor Paul Tudor Jones. Jones predicted that if Warren were to clinch the 2020 election, “the S&P 500 would plunge 25%,” CNBC reported Nov. 5. He also predicted that if President Donald Trump were to win reelection, the S&P would see “another 15% upside for the market.” This prediction came one day after the stock market hit another record high, according to Forbes Nov. 4.