This week, President Donald Trump began openly considering at what point the American government ought to take steps to reopen the American economy. He explained: "Our country wasn't built to be shut down. America will again and soon be open for business," suggesting that the timeline will be weeks instead of months.



On Morning Joe, Joe Scarborough pleads with congressional leaders to strip out the provision in the coronavirus bailout bill that prohibits President Trump's companies from receiving relief. Scarborough argues that if the provision remains in the bill. Pres. Trump will have an incentive to make "rash" decisions to re-open the economy. In contrast, if the provision is taken out and his companies can receive relief, his only motivation will be to keep Americans healthy and safe. 



Leah Barkoukis at Townhall reports The New York Times tweaked its headline several times on a story about Democrats blocking a coronavirus “stimulus package" on Sunday. Ed Morrissey at Hot Air noticed the first headline was surprisingly accurate: "Senate Democrats blocked action on a trillion-dollar stimulus plan." Then, it was edited down into "Partisan Divide Threatens Deal on Rescue Bill." 



CNBC apparently had no problem treating Sen. Mitt Romney’s (R-UT) coronavirus plan to give “every” American $1,000 as a rational idea. CNBC came right off the bat to make the senator look like some sort of philanthropist: “GOP Sen. Mitt Romney proposed on Monday sending every American adult $1,000 to ease the financial pain of the coronavirus pandemic that has tanked global markets and threatened to grind U.S. economic activity to a halt.” 



When the economy gets you down, just throw truckloads of taxpayer cash at it. At least, that’s what MSNBC Anchor Chris Hayes says Congress should do. Hayes sent out his policy prescription on Twitter in the early morning of March 13: “I increasingly convinced we need Congress to pass a trillion dollar stimulus in the next week, focused on people not industry bailouts. Probably best just direct cash.”



Looks like the liberal blowhard HBO comedian Bill Maher may be getting his wish. Maher had been begging for a market crash and recession to occur in hopes it would oust President Donald Trump from the White House. In 2018, he sniped, “I feel like the bottom has to fall out at some point, and by the way, I’m hoping for it because I think one way you get rid of Trump is to crash the economy.”



In July, Adam Grant, organizational psychologist at Wharton Business School, tweeted: “Agendas aren't driven by problems. They're driven by solutions. Calling out what's wrong without proposing ways to make it right is complaining.” This week, complaining was the order of the day.



Nothing “free” ever really is, but that didn’t stop The Washington Post from depicting “free” college as a “no-lose proposition for a politician.” The Post noted that several Democratic presidential candidates have pledged to do just that. But the Post acknowledged the devil is not in the details, it is the details. Currently liberals are all fighting over those to decide not only which taxpayers pay for it, but who should be eligible in the first place. Higher education economics reporter Danielle Douglas-Gabriel touted free college as a campaign goal and highlighted that, but ignored conservative views on tuition assistance programs in her July 28 piece. 



You know, there are plenty of Econ 101 students who could tell you that raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour is a bad thing for the U.S. economy. Plenty of waiters and busboys, too. So the counter argument must get away from the facts of the issue and offer something a little more emotionally-charged, like “the racist history of tipping,” in order to push for higher wages in the service industry.



Multimedia journalists beware, if you create a video about a candidate’s proposal without any opposing perspectives, that’s not news and your video will look like blatant advertising. That’s exactly what CNBC’s video about Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and her student loan plan looked like on June 14. It described Warren’s plan in detail, but only her details beginning with her words and citing others on her side.



Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren has grand ambitions for spending other people’s money. Her latest proposal was (by her own estimation) a $1.25 trillion policy proposal for student loan forgiveness and free college.

CBS News made a $49,950,000 error when it reported that Warren’s reparations plan “would also create some incentives for black students and lower-income families such as a fund with at least $50 million for historically black colleges and universities.”



At Slate.com on Friday, Felix Salmon called the Ford Motor Company "heartless" for its plans to phase out most of its car models, because "The losers, of course, will be the workers." Saturday, Ford responded that no jobs will be lost at its Chicago Assembly plant in converting it to light truck production. Salmon posted that response at the end of his column, but in three days he and Slate haven't changed their "heartless" — and baseless — assessment.