To see just how out of touch some in the liberal media are, look no further than Billy Graham. On Wednesday, world-famous Christian evangelist Billy Graham passed away at the age of 99. While Americans, former U.S. presidents and many in the media mourned his death, several journalists took to Twitter to celebrate Graham’s death by hoping he was enjoying hell.

 

The Media Research Center on Wednesday announced a campaign to hold ABC's advertisers accountable for the anti-Christian bigotry spewed on The View. We are encouraging our grassroots army to call The View’s sponsors and let them know how upset you are about a show that smears Christians as “dangerous” and “mentally ill.” 


As of Monday morning, the Media Research Center and its grassroots members made over 25,000 calls lambasting ABC and demanding a full apology for anti-Christian comments made by The View on February 13 that suggested Vice President Mike Pence’s “dangerous” Christian faith was a “mental illness.”


HBO's Here and Now continues to try to set the gold standard for being the most obnoxiously woke show on television. In its premiere last week, we met the main family, the Bayer-Boatwrights, who are made up of an academic, some kind of a counselor (we will see more in this week's episode), and their children adopted from around the world in a show of how "progressive and evolved they are."


Thursday on ABC’s The View, the whole table addressed host Joy Behar’s mockery of Mike Pence’s Christian faith on Tuesday’s show that caused an uproar. Even though the rest of the table, with the exception of Meghan McCain and to some extent Whoopi Goldberg, also made vile comments, ABC only brought up Behar’s comments as controversial.

 

In a sit-down interview with Axios on Ash Wednesday, Vice President Mike Pence told investigative journalist Mike Allen that he was upset to hear about The View’s callous remarks about his faith on their show earlier this week.


In addition to being anti-business, Comedy Central’s new show Corporate is also anti-religion. On Wednesday’s episode, Casual Friday, Hampton Deville’s CEO announces, “We all know there's no God, but there is a ton of money to be made in His name,” in anticipation of meeting with power/money-hungry Glorious Salvation Ministries representative Alyssa Armstrong. CEO Christian Deville meets with the cross-bearing representative of the largest group of mega-churches in the country to discuss how Hampton Deville will furnish them with flat screens, massage chairs, and snacks, in return for the corporation’s logo being broadcasted all over the churches. Or as Alyssa puts it, “Every time my congregants go to pray, they'll be thinking of the Father, Son, Holy Spirit, and Hampton f*cking Deville."


CNN's Chris Cuomo seemed perplexed that evangelicals support President Trump, arguing that they only support him because "he's right on abortion."


Tuesday on The View, the liberal hosts displayed a sudden respect for fired White House staffer Omarosa Manigault, after the controversial figure took her fame to reality television to spread malicious gossip about the Trump White House. With the exception of Meghan McCain, the hosts touted Omarosa’s supposed “leaks” about Vice President Mike Pence’s “scary” Christianity on CBS’s Celebrity Big Brother this week, as gospel-truth.


Today's story out of Miami occupies the sweet spot in the Venn diagram comprised of Univision's anti-Catholicism and its strident LGBTQ advocacy, far from the mainstream of the network's viewership. The network pulled off a neat trick- casting aspersions on longstanding religious freedom protections while slyly advocating for the proposed law that would destroy them.


Saturday afternoon, Christian Toto at NewsBusters chronicled how Jimmy Kimmel has gone from being an "aw, shucks" comedian to "a hard-left comic" who believes (Kimmel's words) that "every talk show host is a liberal ... because it requires a level of intelligence." That sad, ignorant transformation was on display Friday night, as Kimmel attempted and failed to make a genuine point in a restaurant skit which intended to ridicule a Bakersfield, California bakery which refuses to bake wedding cakes for same-sex couples.


There is a little doubt that a segment of the sports press and the public would prefer that athletes with conservative and Christian beliefs keep their views to themselves (but secular and leftist views are fine). This became evident after the Super Bowl, when one sportswriter and the Twitter mob strongly criticized NBC's Tony Dungy, a Super Bowl-winning coach himself, for citing Philadelphia Eagle quarterback Nick Foles' self-professed Christian faith as contributing to his success.