For the second week in a row, TBS’s Full Frontal host Samantha Bee resorted to childish toilet humor to attack conservatives and Republicans with Monday night’s installment featuring Bee predicting that Mitt Romney “soil[ed] his temple garments at the thought of brokered convention” before his anti-Trump speech on Thursday.



This past week, two writers for Mother Jones contended that non-conservative Donald Trump’s presidential bid is actually a byproduct of longstanding Republican efforts to stimulate and profit from what one of them called a “climate of hate.”

David Corn, best known for his role in the release of the Mitt Romney 47-percent video, argued that the GOP "raised the expectations of its Obama-detesting base and primed the pump for Trump. There is not much wonder that a xenophobic and misogynistic bigot and bully who bashes immigrants and calls for a Muslim ban…should now find a receptive audience within the GOP's electorate." Kevin Drum opined that if a Democratic version of Trump, Michael Moore, ran for president, "he wouldn't have any serious impact...There just aren't enough Democrats around who'd find his brand of rabble-rousing convincing presidential material. The Democratic establishment hasn't spent the last 30 years building that kind of party."



Last night on a special post-debate edition of Hardball, MSNBC anchor Chris Matthews railed against Ted Cruz for his supposedly McCarthyite attacks on Donald Trump vis-a-vis his undisclosed tax returns. Yet in August 2012 after Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nevada) insisted on the Senate floor that an unnamed source told him Romney hadn't paid taxes in a decade, Matthews led his program with the charge and gave it credence. 



On Saturday, the Obama White House responded to a petition with over 320,000 signatures begging the president for an interview with leftist HBO host Bill Maher.

"Plenty of us around here watch Real Time because we admire Bill’s passion for spreading the science on climate change, asking tough questions about money in politics, and trying to burst 'the bubble' where some of our politicians — and too many of our nation’s critical political debates — exist." But there was no promise to appea.



The Huffington Post reports in a “Candidate Confessional” podcast interview, Michele Bachmann recalled how the “infamous” Newsweek cover photograph happened – the 2011 "Queen of Rage" shot that Tina Brown & Co. created to make Bachmann look dazed and confused.

The photographer used a strobe light for a "test shot," he claimed. “I said, ‘You’re not going to use that, are you?’" Bachmann said. "And he said, ‘Oh, no, no, no. This is just something I have to give to my editor.’”



On Wednesday, Amber Phillips at the Washington Post's The Fix blog impressively took President Obama to task for his over-the-top bragging about the nation's mediocre (and likely getting worse) economy. She noted that "the biggest knock on the Obama economy ... is that the recovery has been very good for the wealthy and certain sectors and not so much for the middle class and everyone else." Hear, hear.

Phillips referred to a study released the previous day by the National Association of Counties, an 80 year-old advocacy group. One of NACo's maps showed that only 7 percent of all counties in the U.S. have fully recovered from the recession. The irony of the county-based results cannot have been lost on the business writers at the Associated Press, aka the Administration's Press.



New York Times congressional reporter Carl Hulse and White House scribe Julie Hirschfeld Davis teamed up to paint the president as wringing his hands over the current divided state of U.S. politics. One potential culprit almost wholly exonerated? The president himself. Thursday’s report, “Obama’s Plea to ‘Fix Our Politics’ Has Both Sides Looking Inward,” portrayed Obama as regretful, while skipping his bouts of arrogance and the clear animosity he feels toward his GOP opposition. They also pinned the beginning of the division to Robert Bork's failed Supreme Court nomination, without mentioning Sen. Ted Kennedy's scurrilous anti-Bork speech.



In the episode “Iowa,” CBS’ The Good Wife continued its pursuit of painting Hillary Clinton as the inevitable Democratic presidential candidate. On the eve of the Iowa Caucus, the Florrick family and advisers are on the campaign bus debating the pros and cons of doing a “Full Grassley.” (A Full Grassley means stopping in all of Iowa’s counties during a campaign cycle and is named after Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley). 



The rich are "horrible people" -- at least those who lean to the right -- declares economist turned pompous New York Times columnist Paul Krugman in Friday’s “Privilege, Pathology and Power.” The text box: “Can we survive rule by self-centered billionaires?” (Liberal billionaire activist George Soros had no comment.) Krugman channeled opportunistic moralism, citing “science” to confirm his prejudices that rich people who disagree with him politically are bad, bad folks, though Krugman is no prince of humility and civility himself.



On Monday, I posted on the virtually complete lack of establishment press interest in the story of Trevor FitzGibbon, the former owner of far-left PR firm FitzGibbon Media. Fitzgibbon folded on Thursday after allegations of serial sexual harassment and sexual assault were reported in the Huffington Post. From there, the establishment press did virtually nothing with the story.

It will surprise no regular reader that non-coverage is still the norm. Searches this evening at the Associated Press's main national site and at the New York Times returned nothing and no recent stories, respectively. While I'm also sure deliberate refusal to cover an obviously relevant story doesn't surprise the editorial board at Investor's Business Daily, it has infuriated them enough to write a stinging editorial justifiably decrying the situation — especially the press's double standard.



Discussing a focus group of Trump supporters convened by Frank Luntz that aired on Sunday’s Face the Nation, CBS News political analyst Jamelle Bouie promptly trashed them as representing the belief among social scientists (i.e. fellow liberals) that there’s been “a distinct rise in racial resentment and anti-black attitudes” in America resulting as a fact of the Obama presidency.



In the race for next year’s Republican presidential nomination, Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz have made media bias an issue, as did Newt Gingrich during the 2012 contest. Irony alert: Martin Longman believes that it was one of the media’s favorite GOPers, John McCain, who planted the seeds for such press-bashing when he chose his  running mate.

Longman contended in a Wednesday post that “something broke on the right when they were forced to spend September and October of 2008 pretending that it would be okay if Sarah Palin were elected vice-president. The only way to maintain that stance was to jettison all the normal standards we have for holding such a high office. But it also entailed simply insisting that the truth doesn’t matter…Seven years down the road, it’s gotten to the point that Republicans have realized that they can say anything they want and just blame media bias if anyone calls them on their lies.”