‘Meet the Press’ Talk: We Need to Condemn All Who Say ‘Illegal Immigrant’

The liberal media hate machine was running at full steam on Sunday in the wake of two mass shootings the left wanted to blame President Trump for. According to frequent NBC and MSNBC guest, radical Princeton professor Eddie Glaude, not only should we condemn the President but we also needed to condemn anyone who used the term “illegal immigrant”.

As NBC political director Chuck Todd turned to Glaude for his two cents, the MTP moderator lauded him for his past radical preaching’s. “I think in a good way making people uncomfortable when you would talk about it. In a way, it's like it's time to address it. We do see it shifted the conversation a bit,” Todd boasted.

What does it mean to have a discourse in which people are dehumanized? Where you use a phrase like illegal immigrant,” Glaude bloviated. “Where the phrase itself places that person outside of a certain kind of sense of empathy and decency.”

Meanwhile, the liberal media has taken every opportunity to smear and label Trump voters as racist and worthy of contempt.

Glaude singled out former North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory, who was sitting at the table with him. “Children. You use this Governor, children carrying perhaps disease across the border. What happens? You set the stage for people who are even more on the extreme to act violently,” Glaude sneered.

“Governor, you can't condemn that without making the equivalency move,” Glaude angrily spat as he knocked on the tabled. The professor was upset because McCrory reminded the panel that left-wing terror organizations like Antifa existed (an organization that Todd had invited on to his shows before).

 

 

McCrory tried to calmly explain his position while Glaude was getting loud (click “expand”):

MCCRORY: Well, I'm not going to condemn people who use illegal immigrant terms.

GLAUDE: Of course, why not! Why Not!

MCCRORY: Let me speak. We have a series of laws on the book[s] against illegal immigration. If we get rid of those laws, why don’t we just open up—

Glaude got overly emotional and interrupted McCrory, shouting: “No human being is illegal!” Except, the term was used to describe their lack of legal status in the United States.

As McCrory tried to explain how “illegal immigrant” was a legal term, NBC Capitol Hill correspondent Kasie Hunt shouted him down by claiming: “That's not what we're talking about! (…) That’s not the conversation we’re having!

A couple of minutes prior, Hunt was chiding the GOP as a party that “fundamentally lack[s] diversity on Capitol Hill”. Both she and Todd falsely insisted that no Republicans were agreeing to the fact that the El Paso shooter was a white supremacist and a terrorist. A brief glance at prominent conservative and Republican social media accounts prove otherwise.

In the lead up to the panel discussion, Todd kept trying to tie the El Paso shooter directly to the President even though the shooter admitted that Trump had nothing to do with his hate (a fact Todd largely ignored for the sake of the narrative). “The gunman posting an anti-immigrant screed online. This comes after a month of President Trump stoking racial resentment,” Todd declared.

Later adding: “It’s also worth noting that last week we asked whether President Trump's racial resentment rhetoric was a political issue for Republicans. Now we have to ask whether his harsh words are actually inspiring violence.

Here’s Todd giving Antifa a platform not once but twice.

The transcript is below, click "expand" to read:

NBC’s Meet the Press
August 4, 2019
10:30:24 a.m. Eastern

CHUCK TODD: This Sunday, domestic terrorism in El Paso, and another mass shooting overnight. In Texas, a 21-year-old man with violent hatred of Hispanic immigrants opens fire with an assault rifle at a Walmart in El Paso on the Mexican border. 20 dead in the act of domestic terrorism. The death toll making this one of the worst mass shootings in American history.

(…)

TODD: The gunman posting an anti-immigrant screed online. This comes after a month of President Trump stoking racial resentment.

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: We believe our country should be a sanctuary to law-abiding citizens. Not for criminal aliens.

(…)

10:33:06 a.m. Eastern

TODD: The killer who appears to be a white nationalist was captured and placed into custody. He posted an essay online referring to Hispanic invaders and praised the murderer of 51 people in mosques in Christ Church, New Zealand.

It’s also worth noting that last week we asked whether President Trump's racial resentment rhetoric was a political issue for Republicans. Now we have to ask whether his harsh words are actually inspiring violence.

(…)

11:01:01 a.m. Eastern

TODD: Capitol Hill, the immediate response here politically has been extraordinarily uneven. Democrats believing there is an easy way to explain what is going on here, as Cory Booker said. It's time to speak with more clarity and only George P. Bush being the lone sort of Republican out there calling this what it is: White nationalism.

KASIE HUNT: So, Chuck, one thing I think we have to consider here is, you know, Republicans fundamentally lack diversity on Capitol Hill and here in the capital. And when you consider what the El Paso shooter wrote about heading into this, and you consider George P. Bush, his mother, Hispanic-American. He is somebody who has a deep understanding of that community and clearly was, you know, personally identified in that document that that shooter called out.

You don't really have that here in Washington. I mean, the only black Republican in the House announced he's retiring, Will Hurd, obviously, of Texas down in that area. And I think, you know, this is a morning where we're all struggling to find the right words to grapple with this. And, you know, we've had so many conversations in this country recently. Tragic conversations about how do we keep assault weapons out of the hands of psycho paths. And that's a great conversation to have but this conversation is so much bigger.

(…)

11:03:53 a.m. Eastern

TODD: Pat McCrory, can you defend any of this? Are the President's words and statements and his -- do you believe he contributed to the toxic brew? As it was described.

PAT MCCRORY: I disagree with Cory Booker. I agree with the comment made that I don't think you blame the politician, you blame the person who did it. I blamed Oswald, I blamed Brenner, I blamed James Earl Ray, I blamed Hinckley, I blamed a haunting Charles Whitman who, when I was a small kid in elementary school, went to a tower and shot students from a tower in Austin, Texas. I didn't blame Lyndon Baines Johnson at the time.

But there's no doubt that the President has to come out with a strong statement against -- Listen, there are some white nationalists nuts and dangerous people out there, including my state, that need to be called out. Radicals and by the way Antifa nuts that attacked my car just blocks from here and a taxi cab during the inauguration and jumped on my hood with hoods on them. We have to call out radical left-wing groups and not give them any credibility whatsoever.

TODD: Eddie, I want to give you a moment here. Because you've been on the forefront of talking about this white nationalism issue before. I think in a good way making people uncomfortable when you would talk about it. In a way it's like it's time to address it. We do see it shifted the conversation a bit.

EDDIE GLAUDE: Yes. So it's one thing for people to recognize we have a white nationalist problem. That's important.

TODD: We weren't there a year ago.

GLAUDE: We weren't there a year ago. We weren't there a couple of months ago. This is important. But it's important for us to understand the kind of continuity, the line, the connection. What does it mean to have a discourse in which people are dehumanized? Where you use a phrase like illegal immigrant. Where the phrase itself places that person outside of a certain kind of sense of empathy and decency.

TODD: Otherizing.

GLAUDE: Otherizing. What happens when we use language like infestation. Children. You use this Governor, children carrying perhaps disease across the border. What happens? You set the stage for people who are even more on the extreme to act violently.

We are in a cold civil war. We are in a cold civil war. There's some people who bear the burden of it, Chuck. There's some of us who bear the burden. You could take -- you could not blame anyone other than Oswald. My parents had to worry about other folk because we grew up in Mississippi. You had the luxury not to worry about the context but we had to live. We had to grow up in it. So here we have children. I'm sorry to go on and on.

We have children in El Paso right now, right, who just witnessed their family members, their friends shot down because somebody thinks there's a Hispanic invasion of the country. Which is almost exact same language of the President of the United States. Governor, you can't condemn that without making the equivalency move. [Raps knuckles on the table]

MCCRORY: Well, I'm not going to condemn people who use illegal immigrant terms.

GLAUDE: Of course, why not! Why Not!

MCCRORY: Let me speak. We have a series of laws on the book[s] against illegal immigration. If we get rid of those laws, why don’t we just open up--

GLAUDE: No human being is illegal!

HUNT: With respect that's not what we're talking about. That's not what we're talking about!

MCCRORY: He just brought it up.

HUNT: That’s not the conversation we’re having!

(…)

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