NBC Moves Forward With Propaganda Campaign for Democrats Ahead of Debate

For days now, NBC News has been running a series on NBC Nightly News called “My Big Idea” in which they give 2020 Democrats a chance to push their campaign propaganda with the network’s aid and largely unchallenged. Which they didn't do for Republicans in 2015 when they had their own giant field of candidates.

Friday’s edition featured former Housing Secretary Julian Castro, who was demanding universal pre-K. And Saturday’s was about former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper who wanted yet another federal job training program.

The Friday report by correspondent Harry Smith was pure Democratic propaganda. “At Castro's urging, voters in San Antonio agreed to raise taxes for universal pre-k, which is free to low-income families. What he wants now is free pre-k for all 3 and 4-year-olds nationwide,” Smith boasted of his subject’s record.

Speaking of Castro’s record, at no point did Smith note for viewers that Castro had worked during in the Obama administration. Smith recalled that Castro was “elected mayor of San Antonio at just 35, Julian Castro gave the keynote speech at the 2012 Democratic National Convention.” Castro then somehow “later became secretary of Housing and Urban Development.”

Smith’s only question about Castro’s idea was how much it would cost. The NBC reporter didn’t bat an eye at the multi-billion dollar price tag and Castro’s ridiculous suggestion that kids would end up in prison without his program.

“Well, in 2012, President Obama proposed one version of universal pre-k and the price tag would have been $75 billion. It does cost to invest in great education for 3 and 4-year-olds but cheaper than a year of prison,” the former Secretary claimed.

 

 

Smith parroted Castro’s propaganda line of the program being an “investment” as he wrapped up the segment.

For Saturday’s “Big Idea” segment, Smith palled around with former Governor Hickenlooper who boasted of his unoriginal job training program. “We met John Hickenlooper at a hi-tech medical supply facility in Denver. The former Colorado Governor is mightily interested in jobs because when he first moved out west he lost his,” Smith marveled.

Apparently, Hickenlooper’s college degree in geology didn’t pan out after he got fired in 1986, no one was hiring, and the government’s only solution was to tell him how to write a resume and cover letter. Hickenlooper seemed to think things were still run like they were in 1986 and Smith didn’t seem to want to inform him of the federal government’s plethora of already existing job training programs.

His answer, a public/private apprenticeship program called Careerwise aimed at young people who do not get four-year college degrees. Kids start working in high school, earn, learn and get college credit,” Smith pitched on Hickenlooper’s behalf.

Smith didn’t take notice of the fact that Hickenlooper’s solution didn’t address the problem he had, which was the supposed impetus for this plan. The former Governor didn’t have the proper skills after his college degree fell through, but his program was for those who didn’t go to college. That’s not to mention that Smith boasted about how his subject bettered his life without such a program.

Further evidence the series was just a propaganda push from NBC.

The transcripts are below, click "expand" to read:

NBC Nightly News
June 14, 2019
7:11:40 p.m. Eastern

LESTER HOLT: And our series My Big Idea is giving some candidates a chance to tell voters what makes them stand out. Tonight, former Housing Secretary Julian Castro tells our Harry Smith about his big idea for our nation's children.

[Cuts to video]

JULIAN CASTRO: My big idea is universal pre-k for 3 and 4-year-olds.

HARRY SMITH: What does that mean?

CASTRO: To make sure that every child out there can start at 3 years old with a great education, great public education.

SMITH: Elected mayor of San Antonio at just 35, Julian Castro gave the keynote speech at the 2012 Democratic National Convention.

CASTRO (soundbite form the convention): Thank you. Thank you.

SMITH: He later became secretary of Housing and Urban Development.

CASTRO: I see universal pre-K as a key ingredient making sure the United States in the 21st century is the smartest nation on Earth.

SMITH: We met Castro at Dartmouth College, which just happens to be in New Hampshire. Where the first primary will be held.

CASTRO: I'm a proud product of the public schools, but also my dad was a public school teacher for 31 years.

SMITH: At Castro's urging, voters in San Antonio agreed to raise taxes for universal pre-k, which is free to low-income families. What he wants now is free pre-k for all 3 and 4-year-olds nationwide.

What's the price tag?

CASTRO: Well, in 2012, President Obama proposed one version of universal pre-k and the price tag would have been $75 billion. It does cost to invest in great education for 3 and 4-year-olds but cheaper than a year of prison.

SMITH: An investment in universal pre-k, that's Julian Castro's big idea. Harry Smith, NBC News, New Hampshire.

 

NBC Nightly News
June 16, 2019
6:41:49 p.m. Eastern

JOSE DIAZ-BALART: And now to our ongoing series, My Big Idea on the Democratic candidates running for president. Tonight, Harry Smith talks with former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper.

[Cuts to video]

HARRY SMITH: What's your big idea?

JOHN HICKENLOOPER: My big idea is skills training, and we're facing right now a huge skills gap.

SMITH: We met John Hickenlooper at a hi-tech medical supply facility in Denver. The former Colorado Governor is mightily interested in jobs because when he first moved out west he lost his.

HICKENLOOPER: I got laid off as geologist back in 1986. The government had nothing for me. 10,000 geologists lost their jobs. They just tried to teach us how to write a résumé and an application letter to get another geology job. There were none.

SMITH: So Hickenlooper became an entrepreneur, started a brewery, which begot a string of successful restaurants. He was mayor of Denver twice, then served two terms as governor.

HICKENLOOPER: In Colorado, we have 12, 14,000 job openings for cybersecurity. We’re one of the big center, for that and they’re unfilled.

SMITH: His answer, a public/private apprenticeship program called Careerwise aimed at young people who do not get four-year college degrees. Kids start working in high school, earn, learn and get college credit.

How high an awareness do you think there is across most of the people of the United States of the actual pressing need for this?

HICKENLOOPER: I think the awareness in terms of what the solution is relatively low. A national presidential campaign is a perfect place to change cultural awareness. Once we do that, then the solutions are right there.

SMITH: Today, there are 7.5 million open jobs in the United States. And jobs of the future will require new skills. Giving people the training to do them is John Hickenlooper's big idea. Harry Smith, NBC News, Denver.

NBDaily Campaigns & Elections 2020 Presidential NBC's 'Big Idea' Economy Education Bias by Omission Double Standards Labeling Political Groups Liberals & Democrats Broadcast Television NBC NBC Nightly News Harry Smith Julian Castro John Hickenlooper

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