Brokaw Claims GOPers Tell Him They’re Not Fans of ‘Brown Grandbabies’

In another iteration of the liberal media’s suggestion that support for the border wall was driven primarily by racism, longtime NBC newsman Tom Brokaw appeared on Sunday’s Meet the Press and claimed Republicans have told him they’re not enthusiastic about the idea of having “brown grandbabies”.

During the End Game portion of the program, Brokaw wanted to talk about the stuff “we don't want to talk about”. According to him, it was the Republican Party’s discontent for Hispanics. “The fact is, on the Republican side, a lot of people see the rise of an extraordinarily important new constituency in American politics: Hispanics, who will come here and be Democrats,” Brokaw declared.

Brokaw then asserted that when he presses Republicans just a “little harder”, they’re intolerance of other races comes out. “Also, I hear when I push people a little harder, ‘I don't know whether I want brown grandbabies’,” he claimed. “I mean, that's also a part of it. It’s the intermarriage that’s going on and the cultures that are conflicting with each other.

He then went off on how Hispanics could help change that by trying harder to assimilate:

I also happen to believe that the Hispanics should work harder at assimilation. That’s one of the things I've been saying for a long time. You know, that they ought not to be just codified in their communities but make sure that all of their kids are learning to speak English and that they feel comfortable in the communities. And that's going to take outreach on both sides, frankly.

 

 

Just before Brokaw made his dubious claim, PBS’s Yamiche Alcindor huffed about how people couldn’t agree to the facts about the need for a border wall. After explaining how she spoke to the mayor of McAllen, Texas to get “an example to say this is where we need the wall”, she said he was actually opposed to a wall. “So, I think, there's an issue here with people not understanding that facts aren't being agreed upon,” she declared.

The problem is in Wyoming and in South Dakota, they think they need a wall. And in Texas and Arizona, they don't,” host Chuck Todd lashed out in response and to Brokaw’s agreement.

Clearly, one of those groups not sticking to the facts about the need for a wall were the liberal media. What Alcindor and Todd did there was to use the comments of one mayor from one town (where a barrier exists) along the U.S.’s 2,000-mile-long border with Mexico to suggest a wall or barrier wasn’t needed.

There were many other towns and many other mayors who did want a wall and say it would help their communities. That’s not to mention that the Border Patrol said the wall would aid them in their duties.

As the show was wrapping up, Alcindor appeared to take a shot at Brokaw for his comments about Hispanics needing to learn to speak English:

I would just say we also need to adjust what we think of as America. You’re talking about assimilation. I grew up in Miami where people speak Spanish but their kids speak English. And the idea that we think of an American can only speak English as if Spanish and other languages wasn't always part of America is, in some ways, troubling.

The comments by these liberal media folks only serve to further divide the country and cast aside those who disagree with them.

The transcript is below, click "expand" to read:

NBC’s Meet the Press
January 27, 2019
11:26:25 a.m. Eastern

(…)

YAMICHE ALCINDOR: I think that because there's going to be this committee of bipartisan leaders, on the Republican side there aren’t people from border states but on the Democratic side there are. What you’re going to see is people trying to actually talk about facts and maybe try to get on the same page. Because, part of what that speech was about was this, quote-unquote, “rinky-dink wall” is what he calls it. I interviewed the mayor of McAllen, Texas where the President went to have an example to say this is where we need the wall. The mayor said, “we don't need a wall. We have issues here, but, Yamiche, I’m here to tell you a wall is not going to solve them”. So, I think, there's an issue here with people not understanding that facts aren't being agreed upon.

CHUCK TODD: The problem is in Wyoming and in South Dakota, they think they need a wall. And in Texas and Arizona, they don't.

TOM BROKAW: I know.

TODD: Right?

BROKAW: A lot of this we don't want to talk about. The fact is, on the Republican side, a lot of people see the rise of an extraordinarily important new constituency in American politics: Hispanics, who will come here and be Democrats. Also, I hear when I push people a little harder, “I don't know whether I want brown grandbabies”. I mean, that's also a part of it. It’s the intermarriage that’s going on and the cultures that are conflicting with each other.

I also happen to believe that the Hispanics should work harder at assimilation. That’s one of the things I've been saying for a long time. You know, that they ought not to be just codified in their communities but make sure that all of their kids are learning to speak English and that they feel comfortable in the communities. And that's going to take outreach on both sides, frankly.

KRISTEN WELKER: Congressman Peter King, in a conversation that I had with him, spoke to sort of this remarkable moment in which we find ourselves in. He says what has to happen right now, both sides need to ignore the fringes. Because, you have the far-right and the far-left screaming, yelling the loudest. And to some extent, preventing compromise.

HUGH HEWITT: There will be no compromise unless there's is a long, strong double layered fence about 700 miles long. That's the minimum that is necessary. In exchange for that, regularization for 10 million people, not just DACA, not just GPS, there's a big deal to be had. Because, the extremists should be condemned. The fringe should be ignored. And the base can get together.

ALCINDOR: I would just say we also need to adjust what we think of as America. You’re talking about assimilation. I grew up in Miami where people speak Spanish but their kids speak English. And the idea that we think of an American can only speak English as if Spanish and other languages wasn't always part of America is, in some ways, troubling.

(…)

NB Daily Immigration Bias by Omission Conspiracy Theories Labeling Political Groups Conservatives & Republicans Race Issues Racism Broadcast Television NBC Meet the Press Video Tom Brokaw Chuck Todd Yamiche Alcindor

Sponsored Links