Just a day after they tried to shame Second Lady Karen Pence for working at a Christian school, the CBS Evening News took time out of their Thursday broadcast to try and downplay the rampant and well-documented anti-Semitic and racist bent of the Women’s March organizers. CBS finally found the topic over a month after a Tablet magazine story had been circulating that detailed how deep the organization’s anti-Jewish roots crept.



Freeform’s spin-off comedy Grown-ish, which originated from ABC's Black-ish and follows the Johnson family’s oldest daughter Zoey (Yara Shahidi) as she explores adult life in college, took a shot at controversial rapper Kanye West and his support for President Trump on Wednesday’s episode, “In My Feelings.”

 



During another rowdy transition between CNN’s Cuomo Prime Time and CNN Tonight on Wednesday, host Chris Cuomo once again embraced violence as a political tool. Of course, his eagerness to hand out “three knuckles” to racists and homophobes, who said “ugly” things to fellow CNN host and friend Don Lemon, came after he disgustingly conflated Christianity and Karen Pence with the controversial comments of Iowa Congressman Steve King (R).



Showing how little respect and general goodwill they have for the humanity of Trump supporters, CNN hosts Chris Cuomo and Don Lemon hurled more venom between their respective shows on Tuesday toward those who aren’t onboard with The Resistance because, if not, you’re at minimum endorsing bigotry and racism. A quick NewsBusters search of Lemon items would rate his claim as pants on fire.Of course, at no point in their seven-minute-plus discussion did either mention the growing problem on the left.



On Tuesday's Deadline: White House, MSNBC host and former Republican Nicolle Wallace was in denial about the existence of racism within her new home on the left as she ridiculously claimed that "there isn't a strain of racism on the left." Her comments came during a discussion of Iowa Republican Congressman Steve King's flirtations with white nationalists that have drawn condemnation from fellow Republicans.



In her Sunday post on The Atlantic magazine's website, Jemele Hill makes a charge she can't support with the headline "The War on Black Athletes." She claims President Donald Trump is warring on black athletes, but she offers no broad-based arguments in support of her accusation. Hill's post is Part 6 in The Atlantic's "Unthinkable" series, "50 Moments That Define An Improbable Presidency."



On CNN's New Day this morning, Van Jones—host of his own CNN show—commenting on controversial statements on race made by Republican congressman Steve King of Iowa, identified King as representing . . . California. Said Jones: "I'm embarrassed. I mean, I'm raising my family in California. I'm embarrassed that Californians have sent him back [to Congress.]"



In reference to efforts to teach black children, the president of the St. Petersburg, Florida, chapter of the NAACP, Maria Scruggs, said: “The (school) district has shown they just can't do it....Now it's time for the community to step in.” That's a recognition that politicians and the education establishment, after decades of promises, cannot do much to narrow the huge educational achievement gap between Asians and whites on the one hand and blacks on the other.



Last month, normally progressive PBS provided a transparent portrayal of the devastation abortion inflicts on the African American community. The special, titled “Anti-Abortion Crusaders: Inside the African American Abortion Battle,” surprised conservative media critics by giving voice to the message that “the most dangerous place for an African American child is in the womb.”



Just when you thought the liberal media couldn't sink any lower in its deranged attacks on President Trump, along comes Donny Deutsch. On today's Morning Joe, Deutsch plumbed odious new depths with an allegation that Trump's last card is to prey on the sexual fears or insecurities of his supporters. Said Deutsch: "This is all [Trump] has left. That one metaphor, that one thing that talks to that 39, 40, 41% base that says: either the black man, or the brown man, or the Jewish man, or the media man, or the banker man is coming to take your wife."



Malcolm X was a Muslim minister and human rights activist. Born in 1925, he met his death at the hands of an assassin in 1965. Malcolm X was a courageous advocate for black civil rights, but unlike Martin Luther King, he was not that forgiving of whites for their crimes against black Americans. He did not eschew violence as a tool to achieve civil and human rights. His black and white detractors accused him of preaching racism and violence. Despite the controversy, he has been called one of the greatest and most influential black Americans.



Since Friday morning, CNN has devoted a substantial amount of time to hyping the story of a black man who has charged racial discrimination after he was evicted from a Double Tree hotel in Portland, Oregon, apparently for refusing to prove to a security guard that he was, in fact, a paying guest before the police arrived.