On Sunday's AM Joy show on MSNBC, host Joy Reid and The Intercept's Mehdi Hasan devoted a segment to fretting that there is a double standard in the treatment of Muslims as compared to whites after a mass shooting. Reid also invoked a debunked claim that white supremacist Dylann Roof was given special treatment after the Charleston massacre, and Hasan cited a misleading study claiming that most terrorism in the U.S. in the past decade has been perpetrated by whites.



Empire creator Lee Daniels is finally backing off his defense of the boy-who-cried-MAGA, Jussie Smollett, and has admitted the “frustration” he and his colleagues have felt since the hate-hoaxer’s criminal charges. Took you long enough, man.



New York Democratic Rep. Max Rose is portrayed as one of the more sensible freshman Democrats in Congress, but on Thursday, he went on MSNBC's Morning Joe and accused the media of being Republican puppets. 



An issue frequently pushed by leftist feminists is that of the myth of gender-based pay inequity between men and women doing the same jobs in the same industries. The issue is promoted to a young adult audience on Freeform’s Good Trouble as Mariana struggles to adjust to her job in the high-tech industry. The episode airing March 19, titled "Less Than," even moves into playing the race card.



That MSNBC Morning Joe co-host Joe Scarborough does not like President Trump is not exactly earth shattering news. Yet, the former Republican congressman always finds a new way to sound like a Democrat in his criticisms, including in a Wednesday Washington Post op-ed he wrote that made the show's admittedly liberal guests seem reasoned by comparison.



Comedian Jim Jeffries spent his Tuesday evening agonizing over the scourge of racism and what factors have contributed to it the most in recent years. As you’d expect coming from a showbiz lefty, he’s concluded the onus of racism is on right-wingers, whose desire for a “pointless wall” and faith in the power of “thoughts and prayers” leads to both radicalism and inaction in response to acts of hatred.



At a clip of about one bald-faced lie or distortion every 11 seconds, Univision Washington correspondent Pablo Gato evidently decided the murderous attack on two mosques in New Zealand by a white supremacist was just the moment to pull out all the stops in his anti-Trump repertoire.



On Tuesday night, a new drama, The Village, about the multi-ethnic, multi-generational residents of an apartment building in Brooklyn, premiered on NBC. The previews promised to deliver more of what we love from heartwarming shows like This Us, but the pilot warned that we are probably going to see more of what we don’t when it came swinging out of the gate on the controversial topics of immigration and abortion.



CW’s Roswell, New Mexico has been under the radar lately, if only because it could never quite top the low of claiming supporting legal immigration makes you a bigot. This week, however, pushed the bar even further thanks to the ramblings of a Native American character.



New York Times reporter Richard Fausset used his slot in the lead National section Tuesday to dump guilt on Duke University in the name of racial and social justice for rejecting permission to use their land to aid an expensive light-rail project: “Opposition By College May Quash Rail Project – Some See Duke’s Veto As Insensitive to Poor.” The online headline emphasized emotion: Durham Dreamed of a Transit Line. Duke University All but Killed It.” Anti-Duke, anti-“privilege” animus seeps through each sentence along with horror that a supposedly “progressive” (at least for the South) institution would fail to go along with a liberal public boondoggle.



On Saturday's Smerconish show on CNN, host Michael Smerconish brought aboard Democratic activist and media darling from the 2016 presidential campaign, Khizr Khan, and gave him an unchallenged forum to hint that the U.S. has helped create immigrants who are fleeing wars and climate change. He also tied defeating President Donald Trump in 2020 to thwarting the kind of white nationalism that led to the recent terrorist attack on a mosque in New Zealand.



From 6:00 a.m. Eastern to 12:00 p.m. Eastern, CNN analysts, commentators, and hosts repeatedly takes such as “[t]here is a one man who pulled the trigger here” inside two Christchurch mosques on Friday afternoon (New Zealand time), but they very quickly pivoted using transition words like “but” to then place blame on President Trump due to the animal’s citation of the President in a screed CNN has heavily promoted throughout the day.