ABC Ignores Trump Pardoning Black Boxer Put Away on Racist Charges

Many may not know the story of Jack Johnson, America’s first Black heavyweight champion boxer, but it is one that’s an example of a sad time in American history. He was arrested and eventually served a prison sentence on trumped up charges stemming from those who opposed his interracial relationship with a white woman.

But on Thursday, President Trump corrected that heinous injustice by issuing a pardon for Johnson after actor Sylvester Stallone shared the story with him. That’s right, the president the liberal media love to portray as a staunch racist actually pardoned a man who was a victim of true racism. But, of course, not all of the media thought it was noteworthy during their evening broadcasts. Both ABC and Spanish-language network Telemundo omitted Johnson’s pardon from their reports.

In contrast to those two network news outlets, CBS, NBC, and Spanish-language network Univision all celebrated the move by President Trump. Univision and CBS both ran news briefs on the pardon, 24 and 30 seconds respectively.

President Trump today pardoned boxing legend Jack Johnson 72 years after his death,” anchor Jeff Glor reported on CBS Evening News. “Johnson, the first African American heavyweight champ, was convicted in 1913 of violating the Mann Act, which prohibited the transportation of women across state lines for prostitution. Johnson was arrested while traveling with a white girlfriend who later became his wife.

 

 

Filmmaker Ken Burns organized a petition for a presidential pardon for Johnson in 2004 and recently actor Sylvester Stallone called President Trump to make a new request,” Glor added.

NBC Nightly News actually gave the pardon of Johnson a full report at one minute and 43 seconds. “… A surprise appearance in the Oval Office when cameras entered to reveal non-other than Rocky himself,” announced a very upbeat Lester Holt as he led into the report. “Sylvester Stallone standing alongside the President for the culmination of a cause near and dear to his heart, righting a wrong done so many years ago to an American champion.

NBC reporter Ron Mott recalled how Trump learned about Johnson’s case and how long the pardon was in the works:

Today President Trump, flanked by former champ Lennox Lewis and boxing super fan, actor Sylvester Stallone issued a pardon. The President hinted at this potential forgiveness weeks ago tweeting, “Sylvester Stallone called me with the story of Jack Johnson, his trials and tribulations were great.”

Johnson died in the 1940s, his reputation sullied by interracial romances and a prison stint. His legacy and criminal record given an official chance now to get up off the canvass at long last,” Mott said of what the pardon meant for Johnson’s legacy.

Transcripts below, click "expand" to read: 

 

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CBS Evening News
May 24, 2018
6:51:20 PM Eastern

JEFF GLOR: President Trump today pardoned boxing legend Jack Johnson 72 years after his death. Johnson, the first African American heavyweight champ, was convicted in 1913 of violating the Mann Act, which prohibited the transportation of women across state lines for prostitution. Johnson was arrested while traveling with a white girlfriend who later became his wife. Filmmaker Ken Burns organized a petition for a presidential pardon for Johnson in 2004 and recently actor Sylvester Stallone called President Trump to make a new request.

NBC Nightly News
May 24, 2018
7:13:42 PM Eastern

LESTER HOLT: Shortly before that ceremony today a surprise appearance in the Oval Office when cameras entered to reveal non-other than Rocky himself. Sylvester Stallone standing alongside the President for the culmination of a cause near and dear to his heart, righting a wrong done so many years ago to an American champion. NBC’s Ron Mott explains.

[Cuts to video]

RON MOTT: He was a man who struck fear in other powerful men, big and strong, flamboyant and cocky but his affection for white women was a fight even Jack Johnson, the nation’s first black heavyweight champion, couldn’t win. Not in early 20th century America.

REP. GWEN MOORE (D): Jack Johnson was a source of great pride to the African American community for defying and standing up to systemic and institutional racism.

MOTT: In 1912, Johnson was arrested for violating something called the Mann Act. A 1910 federal law aimed at criminalizing the transport of any woman or girl for the purpose of prostitution or debauchery. He was convicted a year later, still reigning champion, then sentenced to a year in prison, fleeing the country before returning to serve his time.

DONALD TRUMP: He was pretty much unbeatable.

MOTT: Today President Trump, flanked by former champ Lennox Lewis and boxing super fan, actor Sylvester Stallone issued a pardon. The President hinted at this potential forgiveness weeks ago tweeting, “Sylvester Stallone called me with the story of Jack Johnson, his trials and tribulations were great.”

LENNOX LEWIS: Jack Johnson is a great inspiration to me. Especially my whole career.

MOTT: Johnson died in the 1940s, his reputation sullied by interracial romances and a prison stint. His legacy and criminal record given an official chance now to get up off the canvass at long last. Ron Mott, NBC News.


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NBDaily Bias by Omission Race Issues Racism Broadcast Television ABC World News Tonight CBS CBS Evening News NBC NBC Nightly News Video Jeff Glor Lester Holt Ron Mott Donald Trump Sylvester Stallone