CBS: Should GOP ‘Broaden Appeal’ Beyond ‘Palin-Style Conservatism’?

In a report on Thursday’s CBS Evening News on the Republican Governors Association conference, correspondent Kelly Cobiella focused on Alaska Governor Sarah Palin, observing: "A lot of Americans would like to see her stay on the national stage -- 45 percent, according a new Gallup Poll. But even more, 52, percent, would not." Cobiella then added: "The party itself is split on whether to embrace Palin-style conservatism or broaden its appeal." A clip of Politico’s Jonathan Martin was featured: "You talk to a lot of these governors and they're very candid about it. This cannot be a white rural male party. And if it is, it's going to die."

Cobiella began the report by describing Palin’s attendance at the conference this way: "Alaska Governor Sarah Palin blew into Miami like a hurricane." In reference to Palin’s address to the organization, Cobiella remarked: "But when it came time to lay out her vision of the party's future, her role in it, her speech was heavy on the past." Cobiella also critiqued Palin’s press conference: "She also gave her first formal press conference since joining the Republican ticket. It was four questions long." After suggesting Palin’s press conference was too short, Cobiella described the Governor’s recent media blitz as simply: "firing back at critics, including unnamed aides to Senator John McCain, who said she spent too much money on clothes and wasn't prepared for the job."

Here is the full transcript of the segment:

6:38PM SEGMENT:

HARRY SMITH: To politics now. As Republicans try to regroup after losing the White House and more of Congress last week, today's round of soul searching began in Miami, where GOP governors are meeting. That includes Sarah Palin, who is not retreating from the national stage. More from Kelly Cobiella.

KELLY COBIELLA: Alaska Governor Sarah Palin blew into Miami like a hurricane. But when it came time to lay out her vision of the party's future, her role in it, her speech was heavy on the past.

SARAH PALIN: Those who came out on the campaign trail also to say -- remember folks like "Joe the Plumber."

COBIELLA: She also gave her first formal press conference since joining the Republican ticket. It was four questions long.

PALIN: The campaign is over, and...you know, we're going to focus here on what we can do as a team of Republican governors together.

COBIELLA: In the nine days since the election, the party's new star has given nearly a dozen interviews, firing back at critics, including unnamed aides to Senator John McCain, who said she spent too much money on clothes and wasn't prepared for the job.

[CLIP OF PALIN KTUU INTERVIEW]

PALIN: Well, it's mean spirited. It's immature, it's unprofessional. And those guys are jerks.

[CLIP OF PALIN TODAY INTERVIEW]

PALIN: I haven't seen $150,000 worth of clothes.

(CLIP OF PALIN CNN INTERVIEW)

PALIN: I'm going to stay above any of that pettiness.

WOLF BLITZER: You're not ruling out a run in 2012 for president of the United States, are you?

PALIN: Not ruling that out.

[END OF CLIPS]

COBIELLA: A lot of Americans would like to see her stay on the national stage -- 45 percent, according a new Gallup Poll. But even more, 52, percent, would not. The party itself is split on whether to embrace Palin-style conservatism or broaden its appeal.

TIM PAWLENTY: We cannot compete and prevail as a majority governing party if we have a significant deficit, as we do with women, with Hispanics, with African-American voters.

JONATHAN MARTIN: You talk to a lot of these governors and they're very candid about it. This cannot be a white rural male party. And if it is, it's going to die.

COBIELLA: For now, Governor Sarah Palin says she's headed back to Alaska, and the national spotlight likely won't be far behind. Kelly Cobiella, CBS News, Miami.

Political Groups Campaigns & Elections 2008 Presidential Conservatives & Republicans CBS Evening News Kelly Cobiella Sarah Palin

Sponsored Links