It’s been eight years since Barack Obama was elected. So, you may be forgiven forgetting just how effusive journalists were towards the Democrat on election night. On the November 5, 2008 Good Morning America (the day after), Bill Weir gushed over Obama’s election: “Last night was transcendent.... Voices from around the world shouted the greatness of America.” 



On Friday night, CNN ran a special unsubtlely titled Democracy in Peril: The War on Voting Rights, hosted by correspondent Kyung Lah, which touted accusations by liberals that Republicans are engaging in "voter suppression" by enacting voter laws, targeting minorities to prevent Democrats from winning.



On his MSNBC show, 'The Beat,' Ari Melber plays a clip of Barack Obama at a rally in Nevada, saying: "Nevada, you could be the first state ever to elect a state legislature where the majority are women [wild applause.] Which, I'm pretty sure things will work better if you give women a chance to run things for a while."



Appearing as a guest on Monday's CNN Tonight, former CBS anchor Katie Couric blamed former Republican vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin for stoking animosity against the "lamestream media" and President Barack Obama as she also repeated a disputed claim that an audience member at a 2008 Republican rally shouted a death threat against then-candidate Obama.



Former NBC and CBS star Katie Couric sat for an interview with Brian Stelter on CNN’s Reliable Sources on Sunday, and celebrated the tenth anniversary of her Sarah Palin interview. This reminded conservatives that there are Republicans, and then there are the “even Republicans,” as in the phrase “even Republicans think Katie Couric was exceedingly fair to Palin.”



Appearing this afternoon on MSNBC's Deadline: White House program hosted by Nicolle Wallace -- his sidekick on the McCain presidential campaign -- Steve Schmidt broke out the tired liberal claim that Republicans somehow resemble the villains of 'The Handmaid's Tale.' The show has been described as portraying "a dystopian future  . . . wherein a totalitarian society subjects fertile women, called 'Handmaids,' into child-bearing servitude."



As the Media Research Center’s Geoff Dickens explained on Monday, journalists loved the late John McCain, except when he got in their way. That hypocrisy was certainly on display on ABC’s Good Morning America and CBS This Morning. CBS co-host Norah O’Donnell lamented “the end of an era.” George Stephanopoulos cheered: “A giant in American politics.”      



Amid glowing tributes to the life and career of Arizona Senator John McCain on Monday, MSNBC took time to use the Republican lawmaker’s passing to trash his 2008 vice presidential running mate Sarah Palin, labeling McCain’s selection of the then-Alaska governor as his “biggest political mistake.”



Remember folks, Vox gonna Vox. Moments after Arizona Republican Senator John McCain’s death on Saturday night, Vox.com sent out a since-deleted tweet that “[y]ou can draw a straight line from John McCain to Donald Trump — through Sarah Palin” that accompanied a piece by politics editor Laura McGann which, in the original version, couldn’t correctly identify the origin of Palin’s “lipstick” comment.



The New York Times lead editorial Monday was dedicated to Arizona Republican Senator John McCain, who passed away on Saturday: “A Scarred but Happy Warrior.” But the liberal editorial page just couldn’t stay classy for the entire 12 paragraph tribute, lapsing into accusations that McCain’s obituary Robert McFadden mostly managed to avoid: "He had principles, and he had flaws, from time to time betraying those principles -- most grievously in the 2008 presidential campaign....he then allowed his own campaign, and himself, to descend to the same debased level, portraying Mr. Obama as a shadowy, untrustworthy and even unpatriotic figure."



In the past couple of days since the passing of former Republican Senator John McCain, several personalities on both CNN and MSNBC have lamented his selection of Sarah Palin as his vice presidential nominee in 2008 as a "mistake," with some suggestions that he helped set up the Republican party to go down the wrong track by doing so.



During Poppy Harlow’s Wednesday show, CNN Newsroom, the anchor took the time to fact check some of President Trump’s tweets from that morning. However, Harlow stopped the buck halfway on one of the tweets, choosing to ignore a valid comparison to Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign.