Jorge Ramos Tosses Softballs to Elizabeth Warren on Immigration

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Univision’s weekly political affairs show Al Punto has become a safe space for 2020 Democratic presidential candidates- a place where they can expect host Jorge Ramos to deviate from his “contrapoder” (opposed to power) gimmick so long as they pander on immigration and other issues.

Watch as Ramos collects Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s immigration plan the way an auctioneer elicits a bid, before segueing into her use of the non-word “Latinx” (Click "Expand" to view transcript): 

 

 

RAMOS: Let me ask you about immigration. Senator Sanders has committed to introducing immigration reform during his first 100 days as president, which would legalize millions of undocumented (immigrants). Can you commit to doing the exact same thing?

WARREN: So, yes. My immigration plan, which I’ve been talking about for a long time, has two very important parts: first, expanding legal immigration and creating a pathway to citizenship for people that are already here.  are our neighbors, and our friends. It is not enough to simply focus on DACA. We need a pathway to citizenship for all those who are here and are here to stay, and I commit to working on that from the start of my presidency.

RAMOS: So can you commit to doing it within the first 100 days?

WARREN: Yes. 

RAMOS:  I remember that President Barack Obama committed to doing it during his first year in the White House, and he broke his promise. So do you want to do it in the first 100 days?

WARREN: I know. Yes.

RAMOS: All right. OK. I see that you often use “Latinx” instead of “Latinos” or “Latinas”. Why is that?

WARREN: Um, I am told that many people feel that this word is more inclusive. I just want to be respectful, and that’s what’s most important to me, and to use whatever is the most inclusive and most respectful word possible. If I don’t have it right, I want to get it right.

 

The closest thing to a tough question that Warren faced in this softball practice session was when Ramos asked about recent campaign departures in Nevada due to “a toxic work environment”. But Ramos offered no follow-up once Warren got through her initial response. You see, there was an immigration bid to collect. In fact, Ramos offered no follow-up questions other than to get Warren to commit to proposing an immigration bill within her first 100 days in office. As our most recent study demonstrates, immigration is a top-of-mind issue at Univision.

In fact, the questions left unasked are the most remarkable thing about this Warren interview. Consider the questions that made it to the televised portion of the interview:

  • "You finished third in Iowa, and polls show that you are winning neither New Hampshire nor Nevada. What, then, is your plan to make it to the White House?"
  • "Senator, do you have a Latino problem? I ask you this because six women, all minorities, left your Nevada campaign with complaints about the culture of the team. Could you explain what happened?"
  • "Let me ask you about immigration. Senator Sanders has committed to introducing immigration reform during his first 100 days as president, which would legalize millions of undocumented (immigrants). Can you commit to doing the exact same thing?"
  • "So can you commit to doing it within the first 100 days?"
  • "I remember that President Barack Obama committed to doing it during his first year in the White House, and he broke his promise. So do you want to do it in the first 100 days?"
  • "I see that you often use “Latinx” instead of “Latinos” or “Latinas”. Why is that?"
  • "Why, in the year 2020, is it still so difficult for a woman to become President of the United States? This has already happened in many Latin American countries, but we haven’t been able to do so in this country? Why?"
  • "One final question about another very influential woman. Do you believe that Nancy Pelosi did the right thing by ripping apart President Trump’s speech?"

There were zero questions whatsoever about Warren's plans beyod immigration; no inquiry about how Warren expects to pay for Medicare for All or how such spending might affect the current economic boom. Does she think this economy is helpful to Hispanics? If not, then why not? 

Likewise, there was nothing at all asked about the misappropriation of ethnic identity for personal gain, which might be of interest to the Hispanic community. Ramos also failed to inquire about Warren’s other questionable statements, which is quite odd coming from someone who has built a persona around the calling out of public lies and speaking truth to power. Perhaps it's as simple as Ramos only feeling compelled to do the calling out when the subject’s name is followed by an R.

In any case, Univision has proven itself to be, yet again, a liberal immigration PAC with a broadcast license, this dumpster fire of an interview serving no real purpose other than to reduce Hispanics, yet again, to little more than immigration supplicants.

The market cries out for an alternative.

Click “Expand” to view the full transcript of the aforementioned interview as aired on Univision’s Al Punto on Sunday, February 9th, 2020:

JORGE RAMOS, UNIVISION: Senator Elizabeth Warren wants to be the first female president of the United States, but why is it so difficult? The senator finished third in Iowa and in Nevada -a state with many Latinos- has had problems with her campaign. She joins us from New Hampshire to talk about her strategy to earn the Latino vote. Senator, thank you for talking to us.

SEN. ELIZABETH WARREN (D-MA): Thank you for inviting me, I really appreciate it.

RAMOS: You finished third in Iowa, and polls show that you are winning neither New Hampshire nor Nevada. What, then, is your plan to make it to the White House?

WARREN: You know, my plan is to talk about the same things I’ve been talking about for almost my entire adult life. I haven’t always been running for office. I’m someone who grew up as the daughter of a janitor, my mother worked for minimum wage at Sears, I became a public school teacher and later on, a college professor. I’ve been fighting for American families for nearly my entire life. I ran for the Senate in 2012 by showing how we have a federal government that works very well for rich people but isn’t working for everyone else, and I joined the fight for working families- I was down 19 points and ended up winning by seven and a half points. I’ve been underestimated before, and I’m doing this because it is the right thing to do.

RAMOS: Senator, do you have a Latino problem? I ask you this because six women, all minorities, left your Nevada campaign with complaints about the culture of the team. Could you explain what happened?

WARREN: I believe these women. Unequivocally. And I feel very sorry because they had that experience with the campaign. I’ve tried to create a campaign, and at the Senate office too, and everywhere I’ve worked, where everyone feels welcome, a diverse place, a place where each person can bring their culture. I also recognize that here in the United States, we have a long history of racism, also of oppression, and that means that we must remain ever vigilant and always try to do better. I take personal responsibility for all of this, and my team is working to address this problem.

RAMOS: Let me ask you about immigration. Senator Sanders has committed to introducing immigration reform during his first 100 days as president, which would legalize millions of undocumented (immigrants). Can you commit to doing the exact same thing?

WARREN: So,yes. My immigration plan, which I’ve been talking about for a long time, has two very important parts: first, expanding legal immigration and creating a pathway to citizenship for people that are already here.  are our neighbors, and our friends. It is not enough to simply focus on DACA. We need a pathway to citizenship for all those who are here and are here to stay, and I commit to working on that from the start of my presidency.

RAMOS: So can you commit to doing it within the first 100 days?

WARREN: Yes. 

RAMOS:  I remember that President Barack Obama committed to doing it during his first year in the White House, and he broke his promise. So do you want to do it in the first 100 days?

WARREN: I know. Yes.

RAMOS: All right. OK. I see that you often use “Latinx” instead of “Latinos” or “Latinas”. Why is that?

WARREN: Um, I am told that many people feel that this word is more inclusive. I just want to be respectful, and that’s what’s most important to me, and to use whatever is the most inclusive and most respectful word possible. If I don’t have it right, I want to get it right.

RAMOS: Why, in the year 2020, is it still so difficult for a woman to become President of the United States? This has already happened in many Latin American countries, but we haven’t been able to do so in this country? Why?

WARREN: Well, we haven’t done it until we do it. In 1960, here in the United States, people said a Catholic couldn’t be president. The Democratic Party nominated John Fitzgerald Kennedy, a Catholic, and he was elected. In 2008, people said that an African-American man could not be elected president, but the Democrats nominated Barack Obama and he was elected president. I believe we can do it again in 2020. And I believe that I can be the nominee for the Democratic Party, and win this election.One thing that’s really important that we must remember is that the world has changed since 2016. After Donald Trump was elected, women have helped us retake the House as candidates and as people who came out as activists and supported them in order to achieve that change, and in such competitive elections, women have been outperforming men since Donald Trump was elected. So women win.

RAMOS: One final question about another very influential woman. Do you believe that Nancy Pelosi did the right thing by ripping apart President Trump’s speech?

WARREN: You know, I don’t second-guess Nancy Pelosi. She leads the House the way she believes is the right way and I leave my confidence with her.

RAMOS: Senator Warren, thanks so much for talking to us.

WARREN: Thank you so much for having me. I hope we can do this again.

 

NB Daily 2020 Presidential Immigration Corporate Liberalism Univision Jorge Ramos Donald Trump Elizabeth Warren
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