Fearing another loss by Democrats in the 2020 elections, would-be political adviser Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is offering a game plan to progressives in hopes that their nominee will defeat "liar and cheater" President Donald Trump in the UK Guardian.



There's no need for African American NBA players to stand with Hong Kong, not when America has far greater flaws, wrote The Shadow League blogger Carron J. Phillips. It's not their responsibility to save the world, especially a problem created by a white man, he argued. Instead, they should focus on overcoming white privilege and police brutality in America. 



By refusing to stand up for the freedom of Hong Kong against China's oppressive government, LeBron James experienced the "most disgraceful moment" of his career, says the USA Today. Other media joined in the beat-down of the Lakers' superstar, but some excused James' words by turning their venom on America.



After the Washington Mystics won the WNBA title last week, Martenzie Johnson took to the ESPN blog, The Undefeated, to declare that athletes who are heavily into social justice activism are not distractions, but champions. The WNBA is considered the most far Left league in American sports, and the mouthy Mystics are one of the most socially active teams in that league.



You know it's bad for the NBA when the media, who normally applaud the huge cultural icon for championing its social justice warriors, is getting slammed by the liberal media. On Sunday, Mitch Albom of the Detroit Free Press took the NBA apart for acquiescing to China's iron-fisted tyrants. While at it, he also characterized the normally untouchable SJW mouthpiece LeBron James as a money-talks hypocrite.



Earlier this week, Newsbusters' Gabriel Hays exposed Golden State Warriors' woke coach Steve Kerr for saying nothing about China's brutal crackdown on freedom-seeking Hong Kong citizens. "If only he would be as circumspect when gun control or Donald Trump are at issue,'' Hays wrote. No sooner said than done. In a Thursday press conference, Kerr gave China another pass, ridiculed President Trump and condemned America for abuses and gun violence.



The NBA sure talks a good game about free speech rights ― out of one side of its collective mouth. Amidst China's seething anger over Houston general manager Daryl Morey expressing support for freedom in Hong Kong, NBA commissioner Adam Silver mildly defended the American's free speech rights. But on Tuesday night, two fans were ejected from an NBA exhibition game in Philadelphia for peacefully protesting against China. Talk about inconsistency.



Remember way back in 2018 when “Shut up and dribble” was a horrible thing to say to millionaire athletes who are paid to, er, dribble? Times sure have changed. (Or maybe the phrase sounds better said with a Chinese accent?) Fox Sports’ Jason Whitlock remembers that too, which is why he said on Speak for Yourself Tuesday, “The NBA is strangling on its own hypocrisy.” He was speaking, of course, about the league’s (and numerous coaches’ and players’) craven ducking and covering.



The NBA isn't the only organization drawing criticism for the China-Daryl Morey controversy. ESPN now looks like the Worldwide Leader In Sports Compromisers, as its television commentators treat the controversy with kid gloves. Deadspin's Laura Wagner points out that ESPN has a working agreement with Tencent, a large Chinese internet company that covers the NBA, and may not want to anger its partners.



Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives are pushing HR 40, a bill calling for a commission to study and develop reparation proposals for African-Americans. Burgess Owens, an African-American, former NFL player and now a Fox News contributor, testified against this bill in June and, a few days ago, he appeared in an opposition video on Prager University.



The Washington Post on Saturday continued its seemingly never-ending campaign against Indian imagery with a story on a St. Louis Cardinals pitcher who called the Atlanta fans' tomahawk chop "disrespectful." The Post frequently advocates against the Washington Redskins nickname, and with the Cards and Braves hooked up in a National League playoff series, writer Jake Russell lets St. Louis reliever Ryan Helsley pick up the anti-Native nickname drumbeat.



To left-stream media in Missouri, free speech extends to inflammatory actions by athletes, but not to Republican politicians who comment on those activities.