Julia A. Seymour

Julia A. Seymour's picture
Assistant Managing Editor for MRC Business


Julia A. Seymour is the Assistant Managing Editor for the MRC Business where she analyzes and exposes media bias on a range of economic and business issues. She has written Special Reports including Global Warming Censored, UnCritical Condition, Networks Hide the Decline in Credibility of Climate Change Science and Obama the Tax Cutter.

Seymour has also appeared on Fox News Channel, Fox Business Network and the Christian Broadcasting Network and has been an in-studio guest on the G. Gordon Liddy Show. She has also done hundreds of radio interviews on a wide-range of topics with stations in more than 35 states as well as many nationally syndicated programs. Her work has appeared or been mentioned by radio host Rush Limbaugh, Mark Levin, The Drudge Report, WorldNetDaily, USA Today, CNBC.com, Motley Fool and “Ted, White and Blue” by Ted Nugent. Prior to joining BMI in 2006, she was a staff writer for Accuracy in Academia where she wrote  about bias in lower and higher education and contributed to the book “The Real MLA Stylebook.” She holds a B.S. in Mass Communications: Print Journalism from Liberty University.

Latest from Julia A. Seymour

The February 2018 stock market correction was painful to watch, but the news media exaggerated the situation — piling on panic and blame with descriptions like “crash” and “freefall” — after ignoring most previous records.


Two nights before the Philadelphia Eagles took home its first Super Bowl trophy, the networks were far more focused on stories related to the big game than to one measure of the U.S. economy. So pre-game stories still outranked the strong jobs report nearly 5-to-1.


While the early February market pullback has spooked some investors and already gained plenty of media attention, it illustrated all too well the broadcast networks’ tendency to cover bad economic news more than good. The networks skipped the vast majority of records as the market climbed throughout 2017 and the beginning of 2018.


When the Dow Jones Industrial Average “nosedived” by nearly 666 points on Feb. 2, it got plenty of network attention. In fact, it got more coverage than the two huge Dow milestones that preceded it — combined.

Although that one-day selloff was a 2.5 percent drop which followed huge gains, the networks emphasized the “worst week for stocks in two years.” ABC World News Tonight with David Muir, NBC Nightly News and CBS Evening News spent a combined 251 seconds on Feb. 2, covering the markets. Those same three shows spent about 33 percent more time on the selloff than on two major milestones during the prolonged stock market rally.


Since the campaign trail, President Donald Trump has made an economic turnaround and prosperity a top priority. But the network news media have not made covering economic news one of theirs.

Too often the networks focused on less important stories, such as Amazon’s unique “reinvented” office space called “The Spheres,” and skipped key economic news.


Thousands of workers across the U.S. were awarded bonuses, wages hikes or higher retirement account matches this year thanks to the tax reform bill recently passed by the GOP and signed into law by President Donald Trump. But this huge economic story affecting so many was practically ignored by the network evening news shows in 2018.


The mayor of New York City is suing the five largest oil companies in the world over climate change. Far left New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said on Jan. 10, his city was suing BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil and Royal Dutch Shell seeking billions of dollars to “recoup money spent by the city for resiliency efforts related to climate change,” Associated Press reported. Some of the companies disputed his allegations or argued they’ve made “good faith attempts to address climate change.”


A weaker than expected jobs report managed to capture the attention of the three broadcast networks evening newscasts. That was quite a switch.Those same news programs often underreported good economic news in the past year. ABC World News skipped reporting the jobs report four times in 2017.


As much of the U.S. shivers under extreme cold, the liberal media lashed out at President Donald Trump over a tweet about global warming, portraying him as stupid or confused about the difference between weather and climate. Trump had tweeted, “In the East, it could be the COLDEST New Year’s Eve on record. Perhaps we could use a little bit of that good old Global Warming that our Country, but not other countries, was going to pay TRILLIONS OF DOLLARS to protect against. Bundle up!”


British royal Prince Harry and actress Meghan Markle’s new engagement photos were a small part of all three network evening news shows on Dec. 21. But their news dwarfed coverage of U.S. economic growth (GDP), which got only 9 seconds.


Good news for the economy came quickly on the heels of the Republican-driven tax bill. AT&T, Boeing, Wells Fargo, Comcast and others announced employee bonuses or wage increases, additional contributions to training, charitable efforts and facilities, and U.S. investment. Some directly attributed the decision to changes that will affect them in the tax legislation.


For the first time in its 121-year history, the Dow Jones Industrial Average gained more than 5,000 points in a single year, according to CNBC. The major stock index set that record Dec. 18, following a 140-point rally and a new record closing high. CNBC.com also noted that there had been 70 closing highs for the DJIA in 2017.


White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders asked on Twitter Dec. 17, “Which is the more underreported story of @Potus Year One? -Defeat of ISIS -Booming Trump economy.”

Her complaint about the economy was certainly correct. In fact, the very next day all three network newscasts ignored the news that the Dow Jones Industrial Average gained 5,000 points in a year for the first time in history. CBS This Morning did acknowledge that historic event on Dec. 19, briefly.


Liberal media bias has existed for years, but in 2017, it appeared to reach unprecedented levels given the media’s hostility to President Donald Trump. The media distorted many stories in 2017, in many different ways. They ranged from lies such as Al Gore’s claim that “Superstorm Sandy” proved a global warming prediction from An Inconvenient Truth was true, to using Big Bird to mislead about public broadcasting budget cuts.


Celebrities, comedians and left-wing media outlets lashed out at the Federal Communications Commission for reversing positions on “net neutrality,” a regulation imposed on internet providers during the Obama administration.

“GO FCC YOURSELF,” proclaimed the front page of HuffPost on Dec. 14, with a photo of FCC Chairman Ajit Pai. That was also the name of the website shortcut liberal comic John Oliver has been promoting for months to get opponents to comment against repeal. Yahoo News reported that some Twitter users even urged FCC chairman Ajit Pai to go kill himself for voting against net neutrality.


Another 228,000 jobs were added in November and the unemployment rate remained at 4.1 percent — a 17-year-low.

The numbers were better than expected, however the three broadcast network evening shows barely spent any time on Dec. 8, reporting on the issue of jobs and employment.


ABC’s World News Tonight with David Muir may have clinched the most viewers, but it spent the least amount of time on the nation’s 1.7 million job gains when compared to rivals on CBS and NBC.


The U.S. economy grew at a 3.3 percent rate in the third quarter, according to the latest estimate from the Commerce Department’s Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) released Nov. 29.

Guess how much time ABC, CBS and NBC evening news shows gave that good economic news?


Amid the turkey dinners, tinsel and twinkle lights the holiday season from Thanksgiving through Christmas is also known for charitable giving — people serve meals to the homeless, donate to food and clothing drives, and provide gifts to children in need.


Billionaire media mogul Michael Bloomberg is opening his wallet again to help stop coal — and opening it wide. $114 million wide. Against energy jobs.