On Friday's The Last Word on MSNBC, Lawrence O'Donnell was the latest example of the liberal news network peddling propaganda for Democrats as the MSNBC host hyped complaints about alleged voter suppression aimed at minorities while excluding critical pieces of the other side of the story.



Yes, that headline is real. In covering the effort by over 350 newspapers to collude against President Trump, Wednesday’s Hardball featured MSNBC host Chris Matthews alluding to Thomas Paine’s Common Sense and Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin in the segment promoting the anti-Trump collusion campaign started by The Boston Globe.



A danger is looming that journalists want to warn Americans about. ABC, CBS, MSNBC and CNN on Wednesday all fretted about Kansas’s possible new Republican gubernatorial candidate, labeling Kris Kobach a “hard-right,” “staunchly,” “incredibly conservative” choice. This kind of ideological hand-wringing stands in contrast to the warm response socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez received. She earned some labels, but enjoyed a gentle response from journalists. 



This morning, the big three networks downplayed President Trump’s influence on some big state primary elections happening tonight and instead hoped for a massive “blue wave” to sweep across the nation. ABC’s coverage was the most biased, with correspondent Jonathan Karl gushing that the competition in one state was a “major sign of trouble for Republicans” and a “sure sign” that Democrats had the upper hand.



Since Republican Sam Brownback became the Governor of Kansas, the press has been salivating at the opportunity to declare his fiscally conservative policies a failure, to the point where they believe that their failure is an undisputed truth. Really? If they're such a failure, why have the welfare rolls in The Sunflower State declined by a reported 78 percent, and why have those who have been moved off the welfare rolls into the world of productive work been so financially successful?



The New York Times, never overly interested in Middle America, has nonetheless long had the knives out for Kansas’ Republican Gov. Sam Brownback, striving to make him a national example of the perils of foolish tax cutting and delighting in his “failed” right-wing experiment in Kansas. Mitch Smith and Jacey Fortin. “Kansas Governor to Be Nominated as Ambassador.” The reporters took precisely four words before employing a piece of vocabulary that the paper (and more recently President Trump) uses to indicate disapproval: "Sam Brownback, the beleaguered governor of Kansas..."



A Kansas woman who entered a national makeup artists contest has been disqualified from personally redeeming her prize after having been declared its winner. Why? Because, and only because, she posted on Instagram, without comment, a "Trump for President" 2016 graphic on Election Day last year. Despite having all the necessary evidence documenting what happened, the Wichita Eagle's related story headline only conceded that this is something Gypsy Freeman only "says."



Monday’s New York Times used a new White House office to go after a conservative who represents two of the things it most loathes: limits on immigration and crackdowns on vote fraud. Both trends are encapsulated in the person of Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach. Reporters Michael Wines and Julie Bosman penned: “A ‘Passionate’ Seeker of Voter Fraud in Kansas Gets a National Soapbox.”



Whatever was the matter with Kansas when Thomas Frank wrote his book is now less daunting for the left, believes New York magazine’s Eric Levitz, who contended in a Wednesday piece that the closeness of this week’s House special election in the Wichita-centric 4th District appears to spell trouble for conservatives.



Thursday’s New York Times got a kick out of conservative defeats in Kansas at the local and national level, when it wasn’t from relishing Donald Trump controversies and prematurely crowning Hillary Clinton the winner of the election. Reporter Carl Hulse, always on the look-out for signs of conservative weakness, found a pattern in a defeat of “hard-right” Kansas congressman and Tea Party “firebrand” Tim Huelskamp: “Voters Send a Message in Tossing a Tea Party Firebrand From the House.”



New York Times Midwest correspondent Julie Bosman learned an "alarming" new term from Kansas conservatives for Sunday’s edition: “The Right’s Wording for Public Education in Kansas: ‘Government Schools.’” Some other sneaky terms concocted by conservatives to pull the wool over voters eyes? “Tax relief.” “Pro-life.” “The Democrat Party.” “Death panels.” And another Times writer revealed how Republicans stoke “racial resentments with subtle and not-so-subtle dog whistles” like (again) “Death panels,” “Knockout game,” and “All lives matter.” Meanwhile, the Times does its own quiet semantical leaps; "Illegal immigrant” is out, “undocumented” is in. “Gun control” is out, while “gun safety” is constantly used by the Times in a matter-of-fact manner.



During Barack Obama’s presidency, Republicans have greatly increased their power at the state level, enabling governments in North Carolina, Wisconsin, Kansas, and other locales to enact legislation that Daily Kos blogger Hunter has called, among other things, “straight-up crooked” and that has caused, among other things, a “financial clusterfuck.”

In a Friday post, Hunter theorized that one reason GOP bigwigs detest Ted Cruz is that “by bringing Republican extremism national, [Cruz has] stripped them of plausible deniability of all those bizarre and hostile and really not-working-out-all-that-great ideas.” According to Hunter, “It's rampant Ted Cruzism, aka tea partyism, that's been shredding [state] budgets and sending companies running.”