Just 45 words into a 9000 word, 18 page profile of Sarah Huckabee Sanders, the obsession of The New Yorker becomes clear: The White House Press Secretary is a “conservative Christian.” In the story, the faith of Sanders is dissected and mentioned over and over again by writer Page Williams in the September 24, 2018 issue. If that wasn’t creepy enough, Williams repeatedly felt the need to call out just who happens to be a Christian within the Trump administration.  



The opening monologue of the 70th Primetime Emmy Awards, airing September 17 on NBC, included a little of the usual political slams worked into Hollywood entertainment award shows. The ceremony hosts, Saturday Night Live’s "Weekend Update" hosts Colin Jost and Michael Che, took swipes at Christian conservatives and Roseanne fans.



On paper, the new Amazon Prime original series Forever should be great. It stars Fred Armisen and Maya Rudolph as June and Oscar, a middle-class married couple in California. Those two actors together should have made it a hilarious comedy. Instead, Forever was a rambling and pointless slog and, in the second episode, unnecessarily insulting towards Christians. 



Whether you believe that Pope Francis is pushing a liberal agenda in the Catholic Church or not, the liberal media does, and it’s clear that they will do their best to defend him from criticism. Thursday’s USA Today article deflected earnest criticisms of the pope by painting him as an innocent victim, suffering a clerical abuse scandal pushed by critics hoping to oust him.



A few weeks after giving White House advisor Stephen Miller's uncle whom he hardly knows a forum -- not once but twice -- to attack him on immigration, the liberal news network did the same with a rabbi who has not been his spiritual leader since he was a child.



Appearing as a guest on Monday's Morning Joe, MSNBC contributor Steve Schmidt started railing against Republican candidates running in this year's Senate and congressional elections, applying the words "kook," "nut," "crook" and "weirdo" to several different candidates.



Remember when liberals in the media disdained everything about the Catholic Church? Simpler times. Then Pope Francis came along and muddied things. He talks about climate change, castigates capitalism and plays verbal footsie with lefty Catholic hobby-horse issues like divorce and gay acceptance. This Francis guy, they think, might be one of us.



On Tuesday's CBS This Morning, as the regular team of hosts returned from the Labor Day holiday, the group caught up with NBC's Today show in fretting over a pastor at Aretha Franklin's funeral who delivered a conservative message, but they still did not mention the controversy around Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan being allowed to share a stage with former President Bill Clinton and other prominent Democrats. In fact, former Attorney General and possible presidential candidate Eric Holder even posed for a photograph with the ardently anti-Semitic religious figure.



Monday's Today show displayed the latest example of how the journalistic definition of "controversy" is when liberal activists are offended. In the aftermath of singing legend Aretha Franklin's funeral. the Today show aired a full report highlighting complaints against two of the event's pastors that came from the left, but the show still ignored the more offensive on-stage presence of Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan.



The Washington Post followed the example of The New York Times with a Thursday article that played up the role of conservative Catholics in the release of a former Vatican diplomat's recent "testimony" against Pope Francis. Michelle Boorstein emphasized that "conservative Catholic media outlets have become power players by conveying the anti-Francis point of view." She also zeroed in on the role of "powerful Italian conservatives" in breaking the story.



WASHINGTON — Many years ago, in the early 1980s, I was drawn ever so transiently into the bureaucratic intricacies of the Roman Catholic Church in America. There was a saintly priest at Indiana University, Rev. James Higgins, who was driven from the university's Newman Center to a parish some 20 miles away from campus. The archbishop of Indianapolis replaced him with two utter lightweights.



Sexual scandals and inappropriate behavior are as old as the Bible. I give you (1 Corinthians 5:1) in which Paul writes: “It is actually reported that there is sexual immorality among you, and of a kind that even pagans do not tolerate: A man is sleeping with his father's wife.” In more modern times, there have been sex scandals involving TV evangelists from Aimee Semple McPherson in the '20s to Jim Bakker and Jimmy Swaggart in the '80s. And there have been more recent examples, too, Ted Haggard, Bob Coy, Bill Gothard.