Though the NFL recently tilted further to the cultural Left by aligning with rapper Jay-Z for the direction of future Super Bowl entertainment, ESPN's race-baiting Bomani Jones is ripping the new partners for selling out Colin Kaepernick. Jones took to the sports section of the ESPN blog, The Undefeated, to bash billionaire NFL owners, Jay-Z and "white supremacist" President Donald Trump while defending Kaepernick's social justice crusade.



Reading more like a political action committee's website, The Washington Post sports section devoted a story this week to a progressive sports announcer's upcoming book aiming to discourage the 2020 re-election of Senate President Mitch McConnell (Rep-Kentucky). Ben Strauss wrote the story about a book-length rebuke of McConnell by Matt Jones, a "southern progressive populist," sports radio host in Kentucky and ongoing critic of the long-time senator. The book is co-authored by Chris Tomlin, not to be mistaken for the popular Christian singer Chris Tomlin.



Athlete activism is both growing and diversifying, just in time for the 2020 Summer Olympics and the U.S. election, writes The Washington Post's Jerry Brewer. It's all the more reason for this sports columnist to stray from his lane and stick to the promotion of athlete/coach activism. "Could there be many displays that paint the ugly picture of divisiveness in America?" Brewer asks.



Brent Suter is a relief pitcher for the Milwaukee Brewers who isn't looking to Mariano Rivera or Lee Smith, two relievers who were recently inducted into baseball's Hall of Fame, for his inspiration. His role model is Al Gore, and he's trying to save the planet. Suter's worldly mission got a big boost Tuesday from The Washington Post's Dave Shelnin, whose story details Suter's efforts to save the world.



Former World Series champion and six-time baseball all-star Curt Schilling's talk of running for Congress is drawing "combustible" reactions from hostile media, along with strong support from his pal, President Donald Trump. The former major league pitcher especially incited the rancor of The Washington Post and USA Today.



A new survey of Native American opinions on the Washington Redskins' nickname once again demonstrates underwhelming opposition to the moniker and just how out of touch the so-called "mainstream media" really is. The new survey duplicates the Washington Post's 2016 poll finding that 90 percent of Natives are not offended by the Redskins' nickname ― much to the disappointment of writers at the Post. Like Theresa Vargas, who insists the name is a dictionary-defined slur, no matter how many people accept the word.



American fencer Race Imboden deserves induction into the "Hall of Shame" for kneeling on the victory stand at the Pan American Games and dishonoring his country on social media Friday. The Democratic Underground certainly loves his tweet blaming a "hateful" President for his pathetic protest, and Bleacher Report gave him a platform for encouraging other athletes to disrespect the U.S. flag.



Washington Post sports writer John Feinstein, author of the 1986 inside look at former Indiana University basketball coach Bobby Knight (A Season On the Brink), can't wait to hear from right-wingers about his latest column condemning the notion of sticking to sports. In a tweet promoting the column, Feinstein dismisses the idea of sports writers and athletes sticking to sport as "ludicrous.":



We can officially classify the USA Today's Jarrett Bell as a multi-tasking sports writer and social justice warrior. He's earned his spurs ― if that isn't too militaristic a word for sensitive progressives ― especially after today's puff piece lathering praise upon the Miami Dolphins' receiver/anthem kneeler Kenny Stills. Bell writes that "Activist and Trump critic Kenny Stills is the kind of player every NFL team needs".



Fearing they'll lose their reputation as the Worldwide Leader in Entertainment and Sports "Political" Network, ESPN personalities are defying President Jimmy Pitaro's stick-to-sports directive. Some of the network's biggest names trampled over his restrictions on politicizing their work, using social media to strongly advocate for government action to stop shooting massacres.



Scoring five goals in one game can give a pro soccer player an inflated sense of self importance on matters of public policy. Philadelphia Union winger Alejandro Bedoya got so full of himself on his huge day Sunday in D.C., that he dictated a gun control demand to Congress. USA Today's For The Win sports blog denied it was a call for gun control and labeled it "patriotism at its best."



For the second year in a row and following the horrific shootings in Dayton and El Paso, social justice warriors have politicized the Pro Football Hall of Fame induction ceremony. Champ Bailey and Ed Reed exploited their Hall of Fame platform to position gun violence and racism as America’s biggest issues. A year ago, Hall of Fame inductee Randy Moss wore a tie politicizing the deaths of several African-American men. Carron J. Phillips, a social justice writer for The Shadow League, championed all three former NFL stars as "true patriots."