Washington Post art critic Philip Kennicott ripped into the Age of Reagan in reviewing a new exhibit at Washington's Hirshhorn Museum that “explores the evaporation of the line between art and commodity in the 1980s.” Attacking Reagan apparently required a dollop of the never-ending Fake News of the Reagan administration’s “purposeful neglect” of homosexuals dying from AIDS.


Back in 2013, with Democrats controlling the Senate and White House, a study by the Media Research Center determined that the broadcast networks mostly blamed Republicans for that year's government shutdown. In the midst of the shutdown, Democratic Senator Chuck Schumer (now the Democratic Senate leader) actually went on ABC's This Week on October 6, 2013 to assure host George Stephanopoulos that Democrats would never shut the government down over an issue such as immigration.


Liberals love to congratulate themselves for being “on the right side of history,” while of course, consigning conservatives to the “wrong side.” But history takes its sweet time unfolding, and liberals are an impatient lot. So they like to retrofit existing history, demanding that people and events be judged according to their modern progressive pieties, and lumping conservatives in with historical villains.


In Sunday’s Washington Post, the bragging newspaper couldn’t just run an article on the new “fact-based” movie about its Seventies heyday. The Post gang of movie critics made a list of the ten best Journalism Movies and recruited journalists to tout them. The purplest prose about heroic journalistic activists came from NBC’s Andrea Mitchell touting the myth-making movie about CBS News called Good Night and Good Luck.


In the midst of all the sexual harassment shockers emerging from the media, Hollywood, and politics, the Left is still hailing Anita Hill as the patron saint of sexual harassment. An especially egregious case unfolded on Thursday afternoon, as the NPR show Fresh Air with Terry Gross spent a half-hour re-litigating Clarence Thomas as a harasser with his old journalistic nemesis Jane Mayer (now with The New Yorker) and feminist author Rebecca Traister.The online summary was headlined “For Years, Anita Hill Was A 'Canary In The Coal Mine' For Women Speaking Out.” Only after they’d exhausted two-thirds of the hour on Hill-Thomas, did they turn to the harassment controversies that are not 26 years old.


Exactly one year ago today, Americans elected Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States. But in the days leading up to the election, the establishment news media made it seem as if a Trump victory was unthinkable, as they touted their own polls and predictions as if they were facts. As reporters now thump their chests and label themselves as “facts first,” they should look back with some humility at their performance in last year’s campaign.


On Friday, the Treasury Department reported that the federal government took in a record $3.315 trillion in revenue during the just-completed 2017 fiscal year. None of the broadcast networks bothered to mention the Treasury on any of their Friday evening or weekend broadcasts. Yet even as revenues have grown at an average of 14 percent annually since 1980, liberal journalists have spent that entire time trumpeting the need for even higher taxes.


Right on cue for Columbus Day, the statue of Christopher Columbus in Columbus Circle in Manhattan is getting round-the-clock guards to ward off vandals, and USA Today’s Josh Hafner wants to know “As Confederate statues come down, what about Columbus?”


As we approach Columbus Day, the far left has been pushing a nationwide campaign to smear, tear down and ultimately erase the memory of the man who introduced the Americas to the rest of the world.


MRC Culture has argued before that once all the Confederate statues have been dismantled, suspicious subway tiles retired and any surviving Dukes of Hazard cars been sent to the Earl Scheib Paint Booth and Ideological Reeducation Camp, the left’s War on Inanimate Objects is going to continue.


Clearly, it’s a bad time to be a dauntless Italian navigator whose explorations led directly to the founding of the greatest nation and force for good the world has ever known. More specifically, it’s a bad time to be a monument to that intrepid seaman.


A few days before Steve Bannon left the Trump White House, President Trump noted that Bannon had not signed on until “very late" in the 2016 campaign. Still, much like a ballplayer acquired just prior to the trading deadline who puts his team over the top, Bannon made a crucial contribution to Trump’s win, suggests New York’s Jonathan Chait. Bannon realized well before he joined the Trump campaign that if Hillary-bashing had a respectable face, it could find a far larger and more persuadable audience than the old-school wacky conspiratorial stuff did.