It’s been 18 years since a presidential election was clogged and stalled by a recount after a close finish in Florida, and now it’s happening again after Republicans led the election night tallies for Senator and Governor in the state. This time, the national media are scoffing at complaints that Democratic election officials could be seeking to overturn the will of the voters. Back in 2000, those same outlets dripped with suspicion that Florida’s Republican Secretary of State, Katherine Harris, was conspiring to steal that election away from Democrat Al Gore.



This year, with Republicans in control of the White House, House and Senate, journalists are actively electioneering on behalf of Democrats, as a way to put a check on the power of President Trump. But eight years ago, when Democrats held both the House and Senate going into President Obama’s first midterm elections, the media were distressed that liberal power might be diluted, and upset that voters failed to appreciate the tremendous “victories” and “amazing legislative agenda” that Obama and the Democrats had accomplished.



If you think Napoleon Bonaparte was a military genius because he defeated both the Austrian and Russian armies at Austerlitz in 1805 then that must make you a French imperialist. Ridiculous, right? But no more ridiculous than Politico and the Washington Post slamming President Donald Trump for mentioning that Robert E. Lee was a great general. Of course, the whole point of the story that Trump told at his rally in Lebanon, Ohio on Friday night was to illustrate the greatness their native son, General Ulysses S. Grant was in finally defeating Lee. After all it wouldn't have been a great accomplishment if Lee were only a mediocre general. 



All the national journalists acting outraged this week that President Trump would mock the holes in the testimony of Christine Blasey Ford always forget that Bill Clinton's accusers were slashed by the "mainstream" press. Let's recall when Paula Jones sued President Clinton for sexual harassment in 1994.



It’s not as if we haven’t seen this before. Twenty-seven years ago, a last-minute accusation of sexual harassment prompted the Senate to re-open Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas’s confirmation hearings; the ‘he-said, she-said’ confrontation was a media spectacle, including prime-time coverage on the broadcast networks. When it was over, the Media Research Center analyzed the coverage, and found journalists criticized Republicans for being too harsh on Anita Hill, while criticizing Democrats for being too soft on Thomas.



Time magazine took a week off in the dog days of August, so we weren't "treated" to a glowing cover-story package following the death of Sen. John McCain. Online, they reported Sen. Lindsey Graham was "pissed off" at President Trump for failing to honor McCain. Time did not recall how they dumped on McCain when he stood in the way of their idol, Barack Obama, with his "filthy" attacks and dangerous rages. 



Sheila Jackson Lee was right! The astronauts must have planted an American flag on Mars because, according to Hollywood, they didn’t put one on the moon.

The new Neil Armstrong biopic First Man starring Ryan Gosling records the astronaut’s iconic small step, but ignores the other iconic moment from the 1969 moon landing: Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin planting the American flag.



These are interesting times for the legacy of Ulysses Simpson Grant. On the one hand, Ron Chernow’s 2017 biography started or furthered a reputational rehabilitation of the 18th president, whose administration was tainted with corruption (though Grant himself was never implicated).



Last week’s episode of FX’s The Americans, set in 1987, imagined a U.S. arms control official telling an undercover Soviet KGB operative that he’d heard from a White House insider that President Ronald Reagan has “been forgetful, not focused, almost a different person lately. The man I talked to said he thinks that the President might be going senile.” In the next scene, the agent’s KGB handler worried: “Weinberger and his cronies are even more hard-line than Reagan.”



While the Kennedys didn't stop the Chappaquiddick movie, it looks like the Clintons can still create "second thoughts" in Hollywood. The Hollywood Reporter notes Glee creator Ryan Murphy "hit the brakes" on a season of his FX series American Crime Story centered on Monica Lewinsky. The History Channel also had "second thoughts" on a six-part drama series on the Clinton impeachment. 



How far has the manipulative Kennedy dynasty fallen? Somehow, the movie Chappaquiddick was made with well-known actors, and distributed to movie theaters. Seven years ago, pressure caused the History Channel to deep-six a dramatic Kennedy miniseries (it ended up on the obscure cable channel Reelz). This movie is even drawing favorable reviews from the movie critics.



NBCNews.com has a website called “Think” that offers “Hot Takes” – none hotter than radical feminist Jill Filipovic trying to use the Chappaquiddick movie to slime the Republicans. Her headline was “Since Chappaquiddick, Democrats' views of women have evolved. Republicans' still need to. The new movie about the Ted Kennedy's involvement in the death of Mary Jo Kopechne highlights the progress women have made in the Democratic party”. She shamelessly concluded the movie pours shame on Republicans.