In a Friday story about former CNN and NBC journalist Campbell Brown, who is now Facebook's "head of new partnerships," New York Times reporter Nellie Bowles claimed that one of the social-media giant's premium services has "been flooded with far-right conspiracy programming." The "conspiracy" example Bowles cited: "Palestinians Pay $400 million Pensions For Terrorist Families." That claim is widely known to be true. The Times issued a grudging and incomplete correction.



In a podcast posted on Monday, CNN's Don Lemon told National Review's Jamie Weinstein that some pro-Trump panelists on his show have admitted that, in Weinstein's words, "they don't believe what they are saying" — as if knee-jerk leftists never engage in such disingenuous behavior (sure, Don). Lemon apparently has no problem allowing people who have allegedly admitted to this behavior to continue serving as panelists. Lemon's statement is a de facto admission that he and his network are willing to broadcast fake opinions.



On Wednesday's All In show, MSNBC host Chris Hayes used video allegedly showing Palestinians being fired on by Israeli troops while praying to bolster his commentary in which he complained that President Donald Trump did not confront Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu about the military actions. Unlike FNC or PBS, Hayes did not mention that the video has been disputed by the IDF as staged footage -- similar to the hoax videos for which Palestinian film makers are known for producing, sometimes referred to as "Pallywood."



On Monday, disgraced CBS anchor Dan Rather attacked Sinclair Broadcast Group in a rambling Facebook post because they had their anchors read promotional statements promising to be factual in their reporting. Of course, the man who sank his own career with a fake news story he still believes has a problem with people promising to tell the truth.



The American people are very skeptical of “fake news” in the Old Media. A new Monmouth University poll asked respondents “Do you think some traditional major news sources like TV and newspapers ever report fake news stories, or not?”

A whopping 77 percent of those polled said Yes – 31 percent said it happens regularly, and 46 percent said it happens occasionally.



On Wednesday night, CNN continued its unholy and fact-devoid crusade to tar and feather every one of President Trump’s new high-profile government hires as nothing more than a clueless Trump stooge off the street or a Fox News personality. This time, their unfortunate target was Navy Rear Admiral Dr. Ronny Jackson hours after the President nominated him to be the new Secretary of the Department for Veteran’s Affairs.



It’s not often that CNN media reporter Brian Stelter is honest about his blatant biases when it comes to politics, just take his assertions about the President’s mental fitness and his denials of making such connections. But during an appearance on the Monday edition of HLN’s S.E. Cupp Unfiltered, the Reliable Sources host appeared to let it slip that he let radical anti-gun activist David Hogg get away with making false claims about the guns and the NRA during a February 25 interview on his show.



Someone is finally crying foul over an evidence-free fake-news effort pushed by the same people who have promoted the Steele dossier for over a year. This time, the targets are the NRA and President Trump's 2016 victorious presidential campaign. In a Thursday Wall Street Journal column and a Friday Fox News appearance, Kimberley Strassel decried how the press has turned "the most outlandish accusation into 'news'" based only on "the whispers of a couple of Democratic lawmakers" and "an anonymous reference to the FBI."



In another self-inflicted blow to its credibility, Univision once again turned to the discredited Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) to hype the alleged growth of ‘hate groups’ in the United States during the first year of the Trump administration.



In the wake of the former Deputy Director Andrew McCabe’s firing from the FBI for misleading Inspector General investigators, the liberal media were rife with misinformation of their own. During the Sunday morning news programs, NBC’s Chuck Todd mislead viewers on why McCabe was fired and ABC’s George Stephanopoulos lied about the messages sent by pro-Hillary Clinton FBI agents investigating her and President Trump.



For the past few weeks, Showtime’s Homeland hyped the potential danger of armed right-wingers. Now that danger has finally spilled over, and innocent lives are lost. In an interesting twist, however, Homeland just introduced a new enemy behind the lunatic fringe. Less interesting is that it involves Russia, election intereference, and the words “fake news.”



Before Tuesday's Texas primary, the press presented woefully incomplete early-voting data as evidence of a potential Democratic wave. It was fake news.