Conservatives are not going to agree with a lot of points in The New Republic -- and it's more liberal than it used to be in the last century. But there's some common ground when it comes to the media's "fact-checking" operations. There is a lot of opinion smeared all over the "facts."



One of the routine ways the "independent fact checkers" demonstrate a liberal bias is by leaping to attack conservatives for making a rhetorical flourish on cable news. On Tuesday, PolitiFact threw a Pants On Fire" verdict at former U.N. ambassador Nikki Haley for saying no government is protesting the killing of Iranian teerrorist mastermind Qasem Soleimani, only Democrats are "mourning the loss of Soleimani."



Washington Post "Fact Checker" Glenn Kessler was one of many liberal pundits tapped by the Columbia Journalism Review to assess the challenges of Campaign 2020. Kessler found it "incredibly depressing" that Trump never seems to change his misleading ways after being flagged 15,000 times by the Post.



One reason the "independent" site PolitiFact leans strongly to the left is its audience. It relies on tips from its fans to select many of its fact checks, and so when PolitiFact tweeted today a reminder to look at its Readers Poll for the 2019 Lie of the Year, the readers overwhelmingly favored fact checks of President Trump and his team. Almost 88 percent of the votes went to three Trump claims (and one by trade official Peter Navarro):



The "fact-checking" site Snopes.com had one of its regular freak-outs over stupid Americans mistaking satirical websites for actual news, especially the right-leaning Babylon Bee. They actually contacted the White House to express concern that President Trump's Twitter account was spreading fake news (instead of jokes). Sadly, there was a Democrat running against Trump that was dumb enough to fall for a satire site....called MoronMajority.com. 



One of the maddening acts of so-called "fact checking" is the arrogant attempt to predict future outcomes at election time. It should seem obvious this is beyond the territory of "facts." Now PolitiFact has slapped a "True" label on Elizabeth Warren's cost estimates for her socialist "Medicare for All" plan....even as it appends an "If true" disclaimer to it. 



Ashe Schow at the Daily Wire points out that PolitiFact tagged former UN Ambassador Nikki Haley as "Mostly False" for claiming in an e-mail for her new group Stand For America that candidates who are supporting the Green New Deal are "promoting abortion in third world countries to control the population!" 



Richard Stengel, a former editor of Time and Obama State Department undersecretary for public diplomacy and public affairs, used free speech and the press... to attack free speech and the press in a truly pathetic op-ed published in the Washington Post Tuesday.



On Friday, PolitiFact ruled President Trump uncorked a "Pants on Fire" lie when he described the impeachment attempt as a "coup," despite the obvious point that impeachment is designed to remove a president from his office. Since impeachment is constitutional, Trump can't say it.



At the Daily Signal, John Cooper of the Heritage Foundation warned he had an unhappy experience with the "fact checking" unit at CNN. They reached out to Heritage for analysis of President Trump's recent comments about the American military's munitions stockpile when he took office. "CNN completely omitted the wealth of data provided by a Heritage Foundation defense analyst."



On Thursday, we noted the "fact checkers" weren't exactly hounding liberal Rep. Adam Schiff for his false statements about the impeachment attempt and the whistleblower. On Friday, Washington Post "fact checker" Glenn Kessler tagged Schiff with his worst rating -- the "Four Pinocchios" -- after The New York Times reported he and his staff were in contact with  the vaunted anonymous whistleblower. 



Someone doesn't like our "Fact-Checking the Fact-Checkers" project. On Thursday, Snopes.com published an article headlined "Did Mainstream Media Outlets ‘Refuse’ to Cover Abortion Doctor Ulrich Klopfer?" They were questioning a Bozell and Graham column, which asserted that the networks failed to report on Dr. Klopfer's Illinois garage full of more than 2,000 dead babies.  Snopes called this "Mostly False" -- because ABC, NBC, and NPR published online articles on Klopfer, and local CBS and PBS affiliates posted something on the Web.