I must admit: I learned something from reading Alex Seitz-Wald’s post at Salon titled “No, Chris Lane is not Trayvon Martin!” I didn’t know until I read it there that Rush Limbaugh had called the crime the “Trayvon Martin [case] in reverse.”

I agree with Seitz-Wald that the two crimes are very dissimilar, though his and my reasons for so stating could not be further apart.



Corrected from earlier | People who were wondering whether Jesse Jackson would ever respond to the killing of an Australian collegiate baseball player by three "bored" teens in Oklahoma, one of whom allegedly posted racist tweets, got their answer today. Jackson's early Wednesday morning tweet read as follows: "Praying for the family of Chris Lane. This senseless violence is frowned upon and the justice system must prevail."

A BBC report has police saying that "The boy who has talked to us said, 'we were bored and didn't have anything to do, so we decided to kill somebody.'" The related Associated Press report doesn't carry the direct quote, instead impersonally relaying that "Police say the two killed 22-year-old Christopher Lane on Friday to overcome boredom." The AP has not reported Jesse Jackson's passive-voice reaction at its national site, effectively covering for a statement which comes off as "Well, I'd better say something, so let's get it over with." Let's compare Jackson's reaction to what he wrote on July 15 in a Chicago Sun-Times column about the George Zimmerman-Trayvon Martin situation:



NewsBusters readers might recall Stacey Dash, the black actress who was racially attacked on Twitter last year for having the nerve to come out in support of Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney.

Dash took to Twitter again Friday this time responding to Oprah Winfrey's comparison of Trayvon Martin and Emmett Till writing, "Shame on you Oprah":



Ten days after claiming the premeditated lynching of Emmett Till almost 60 years ago was the same thing as George Zimmerman shooting Trayvon Martin in what jurors determined was self-defense, Oprah Winfrey Thursday continued to inject racism into this issue.

Appearing on CNN's Anderson Cooper 360, Winfrey said, "It's ridiculous to look at that case and not to think that race was involved" (video follows with transcript and commentary):



Talk about a hypocritical, mealy-mouthed non-apology apology . . . On today's Morning Joe, Joe Scarborough condemned Republicans who "support[ed] George Zimmerman before they even knew the facts of the case."  Scarborough then added: "you know, I got out early, said some things about George Zimmerman myself, I shouldn't have said, perhaps. I got overly emotional. But I'm not in office. And if I were in office I would have apologized."

Scarborough didn't reveal to viewers the "some things" he had said about Zimmerman. In fact, early on in the case, long before the facts were on the table, Scarborough branded Zimmerman a "murderer."  But Scarborough doesn't feel the need to apologize because he's not a politician.  Is that Scarborough's standard?  The host of a major national show can go on the air and cavalierly and unjustly accuse someone of murder.  But because he's not in public office, he has no need to apologize?  View the video after the jump.



In March 2012, NewsBusters reported NBC’s Today show deceptively edited George Zimmerman’s 911 call to make it appear he was a racist.

On Sunday, HBO actually had one of its primary characters on the series The Newsroom deceptively edit that call exactly the way NBC News did it (video follows with transcribed highlights and commentary):



As NewsBusters has been reporting, CNN's Don Lemon has been taking a lot of heat from black media members as a result of his opinions concerning race relations in America.

On Saturday, in a very lengthy segment on CNN Newsroom, Lemon once again addressed his detractors doing so in a fashion that folks on both sides of this debate should be extremely proud of (video follows with commentary and full transcript at end of post):



On Monday's The Last Word on MSNBC, host Lawrence O'Donnell claimed to present "proof" that FNC's Bill O'Reilly was wrong in his July 22 commentary on race to warn about the negative effects of out-of-wedlock births on the black population.

The MSNBC host also managed to take O'Reilly out of context as O'Donnell suggested that the O'Reilly's were not relevant to Trayvon Martin because he was the product of a two-parent family, the FNC host, in reality, was arguing that out-of-wedlock birth leads to high crime rates among the black population, which leads to people having elevated fear of young black men.

And, while O'Donnell claimed that O'Reilly "defended" the shooting of Trayvon Martin, O'Reilly actually asserted that "it was wrong for Zimmerman to confront Martin based on his appearance," which hardly amounts to a total defense of Zimmerman's actions.

O'Donnell teased the segment by predicting that O'Reilly would be "embarrassed." O'Donnell:



Oprah Winfrey on Monday said the killings of Trayvon Martin and Emmett Till are the "same thing."

This transpired during an interview with The Grio that aired on NBC's Today show (video follows with transcript and commentary):



On Wednesday's PoliticsNation, MSNBC host Al Sharpton not only accused FNC's Bill O'Reilly and other right-leaning hosts of "distorting" the actions of Democrats on the issue of racial "grievance," but the MSNBC host for the third time in the past couple of weeks recounted and distorted comments O'Reilly made in September 2007 about his trip to a predominantly black restaurant in Harlem.

MSNBC contributor Goldie Taylor compared O'Reilly to 1960s segregationist Lester Maddox, a Democratic governor of Georgia known for trying to undermine the Civil Rights Movement.

Sharpton recounted that President Obama and other Democrats are trying to have a "serious conversation about race," playing several clips, and then turned to complaining about reaction from O'Reilly and other right-leaning figures:



"A Hoodie. A Symbol. A Museum Piece? What will become of Trayvon Martin's sweatshirt, the latest piece of trial evidence to capture the public's fascination?" That's how the editors of the Washington Post-owned free tabloid Express grabbed the eyeballs of Washington Metrorail riders this morning.

Manuel Roig-Franzia's cover story on page 12 -- "Iconic Evidence Has Unclear Fate: Supporters view Trayvon Martin's hoodie as more than a trial artifact" -- seems to be spun off from a July 31 Post Style section front-pager, "Where's the Evidence," which looked more broadly at "iconic exhibits" of evidence in high-profile trials such as the infamous glove in the O.J. Simpson murder trial or the Bushmaster rifle used by D.C. snipers John Allen Muhammad and Lee Boyd Malvo. But the closing paragraphs of Roig-Franzia's Express piece chiefly served as a vehicle for MSNBC host the Rev. Al Sharpton to promote his designs on Trayvon's hoodie, not to mention Sharpton's insistence that Martin is the Emmett Till of the millennial generation (emphasis mine):



Fox News Channel's Bill O'Reilly began his Monday evening edition of The O'Reilly Factor by pointing out what anchors on two of his cable network rivals said about his statement that people in “the grievance industry” don't discuss complicated racial problems.

O'Reilly then went on to contrast the actions of Don Lemon -- an anchor on CNN-- who the Fox News host called “honest” and courageous for daring to state that the FNC host was not some sort of racist for daring to state that a number of young black men have destructive habits that are encouraged by entertainment media.