Closing his March 12 Hardball program, MSNBC's Chris Matthews spewed that future generations of Americans will look back to today's politics and see that "the age of Jim Crow managed to find a new habitat in the early 21st century Republican Party." Looking back, people "will learn that a new senator from Arkansas got the signatures of 46 other senators on a letter to the hardliners in Iran urging that they reject the efforts of this president to keep them from building a nuclear weapon" and "they will read all this and wonder what was it that made this Republican opposition so all out contemptuous of an American president?"



The CBS Evening News continued advancing the inaccurate and liberal spin on Thursday that the letter signed by 47 Republican Senators and sent to Iran concerning the Obama administration’s nuclear talks is an “unprecedented” example of “direct interference with diplomatic negotiations.” Pelley ruled that “[t]his sort of direct interference with diplomatic negotiations may be unprecedented” and proceeded to spotlight the fact that the author of the letter in Republican Senator Tom Cotton (Ark.) “has been in the Senate only two months.”



Following in the footsteps of Tuesday’s CBS This Morning, the CBS Evening News worked to paint the 47 Republican Senators who signed a letter to Iranian leaders in a negative light and portraying their actions as meddling in the Obama administration’s negotiations while making no mention of the moves that Democrats made to thumb their noses at Republican administrations.



Closing a panel segment with three fellow liberals about the open letter to the Islamic Republic of Iran by Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.) and 46 Republican colleagues, MSNBC's Chris Matthews subtly hinted that the president's race was a motivating factor for the missive. 



CNN's Chris Cuomo's consistent liberal bias emerged yet again on Tuesday's New Day as he interviewed Senator Tom Cotton. Cuomo confronted the Arkansas politician over the open letter to Iran that he and 46 of his Republican colleagues from the Senate signed: "Is this letter really about explaining the Constitution [to Iranian leaders], or is it an overt move to undermine the President?" The anchor later asserted, "By sending this letter...you are undermining his [Obama's] authority. Isn't that the truth?"



Imagine if a Republican congressperson called Illinois' senior senator Dick Durbin "Dick Turban" in not one tweet, but two (Durbin has been given the nickname by several center-right pundits and commentators; but as far as I can tell, no national Republican politician has used it). Does anyone think it would take the establishment press over 15 hours (and counting) to report it?

Late Monday evening, Democratic Colorado Congressman Jared Polis referred to GOP Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton as "Tehran Tom" twice. In one of the tweets, Polis claimed that Cotton had asked "Iranian Revolutionary Guards for help in battle against US diplomats." Cotton is a military veteran who served in both Iraq and Afghanistan.



Let's call this one "technically true, but misleading."  On today's Daily Rundown, discussing the letter sent by Senate Republicans to the Iranian regime, Washington Post reporter Ishaan Tharoor said that "it is the president who ratifies treaties."  

Tharoor is right, but only in a trivial sense. The president does formally ratify treaties in that he exchanges instruments of ratification with the foreign power(s).   But that occurs only if and when the Senate has approved the treaty by a two-thirds majority vote. Tharoor made no mention of that little proviso.  



On Tuesday morning, the big three (ABC, CBS, NBC) networks continued to play-up the supposed controversy surrounding a letter signed by 47 Republican senators to the leaders of Iran regarding its negotiations with the Obama administration over its nuclear program. CBS This Morning did its best to promote the harshest critics with Jeff Glor introducing the network’s coverage by declaring “[i]n Washington this morning Democrats are denouncing a letter to Iran signed by most of the 54 Republican Senators. This morning's New York Daily News headline calls those Republicans 'traitors.'”



On Monday, NBC Nightly News featured a full report on the letter signed by 47 Republican Senators to the leaders of Iran concerning its negotiations with the Obama administration over its nuclear program, but took the step of describing the letter as one that “patronizes Iranian leaders.” In addition, the report by NBC's Peter Alexander gave three times the airtime to Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif and President Obama than Arkansas Republican Senator Tom Cotton (who authored the letter).



Election night was a tough night for Rachel Maddow. The results of the night, even in deep blue states like Oregon, give conservatives much to cheer and liberals much to dread.



Senator Mark Pryor (D-Ark.) squared off against his Republican challenger, Congressman Tom Cotton, in a Monday afternoon debate moderated by veteran Arkansas anchor Steve Barnes. During the debate, Pryor received some much needed assistance from local journalist Gwen Moritz, editor of Arkansas Business. While answering a question from Ms. Moritz, Congressman Cotton was interrupted by the journalist and obnoxiously asked if he was “answering my question about what your job as a candidate is or are you just doing talking points? Is it your responsibility as a candidate to make sure your ads are not misleading?” 



Reporter Jonathan Weisman looked very hard to find hypocrisy among Tea Party candidates in his Saturday New York Times story "Ivy League Degrees, Elite Consulting Jobs, and Now Tea Party Candidacies."

The online subhead hinted at it: "Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Tom Cotton of Arkansas are running for the Senate as common-man conservatives but share high-flying pedigrees." Weisman's article is sprinkled with "gotcha" attempts that don't stick: