After CNN New Day anchor Chris Cuomo claimed on Thursday that Republicans were “hiding” in the “safe haven” of Fox News in the wake of the Florida school shooting and “afraid” to appear on his network, on Friday, Texas Senator Ted Cruz called out CNN for refusing to air a 15-minute exclusive interview he gave them that same day.


With the Senate Republicans’ tax reform bill making it out of committee on Tuesday, CNN held a previously scheduled debate on tax reform where GOP Senators Ted Cruz (TX) and Tim Scott (SC) teamed up to go against liberal Senators Bernie Sanders (VT) and Maria Cantwell (WA). The matchup promised to make it an interesting discussion, but CNN’s prescreened questions skewed heavily to left. In total, their nine audience questions came from the left at a ratio of 7:2.


The front of the Sunday New York Times featured a 3,300 word story from Michael Kimmelman, “Houston After Hurricane Harvey: The Essence of America’s Struggle,” suggesting reckless free market building policies in Houston contributed to the massive damaged caused by Hurricane Harvey -- a reckless liberal charge in itself. Kimmelman’s hostility for Houston’s “runaway development” seeped out on Sunday’s front page: "For years, the local authorities turned a blind eye to runaway development."


CNN Tonight host Don Lemon went on a nearly-four-minute-long commentary on Monday emphasizing that he’s not “not anti-thoughts and prayers,” but demanded Congress defeat the NRA and pass gun control measures that wouldn’t have stopped Sunday’s Sutherland Springs church shooting.


Republican Senator Ted Cruz (Tex.) spoke to reporters on Monday, a day after the Texas church shooting, and, upon hearing a number of shouted questions about gun control, he laid into the liberal media’s rush to promote the issue as one of the reasons why people don’t trust them. An unidentified female reporter muttered a question about gun control to Cruz seconds after he opened up to questions and, needless to say, he didn’t take too kindly too that issue.


Sunday marked Ana Marie Cox’s last Talk interview on the back page of the New York Times Sunday Magazine. It was the usual loving treatment of a liberal. But Cox’s self-proclaimed “gentle magic” was woven solely to benefit liberal figures; Republicans were constantly bashed in her interviews with liberal figures, while House Speaker Paul Ryan was an undignified "stooge" and "media welfare queen."


What’s more important? A staff member for a Republican senator apparently “liking” a pornographic tweet on Twitter or a Democratic senator on trial for bribery and corruption, facing possible resignation and years in prison? If you answered with the first option, then you might work for NBC News. 


CNN’s Van Jones appeared on Jimmy Kimmel Live September 12, as one of Kimmel’s guests, where he proceeded to argue for civility in politics, between the left and right. But even the far left Jones, who infamously called President Trump winning the election a “whitelash,” seemed to be outweighed in his hatred for the right by host Jimmy Kimmel.


The New York Times featured another jab at that reliable target of liberal media loathing, Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas. Reporters have been tittering at the thought of the fiscal conservative being obliged to change his tune to secure help for his home state of Texas, battered by Hurricane Harvey. NYT reporter Matt Flegenheimer took his turn in Saturday's “Trump and Harvey Push Cruz to Adjust His Style.” The online headline was slightly smarmy: “Ted Cruz 2.0? Senator Adjusts With Trump in Office and Houston Under Water.”


The advent of computer and online technology has made it difficult for newspapers to continue producing and distributing copies of their printed editions while remaining afloat financially. As you might expect, large companies have often snapped up troubled publications in an effort to expand their firms’ influence far and wide. One recent example of this situation came on Monday, September 4, when the New York Daily News -- which has been published since 1919 -- was bought by Tronc, a Chicago-based company that produces the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune, which resulted in a show of support from a newspaper that has been a long-time competitor to the flamboyant tabloid: the New York Times.


On the Wednesday edition of her HLN show, conservative/libertarian host S.E. Cupp ripped into the current political debate over disaster relief funding in light of Hurricane Harvey that’s centered around how lawmakers felt about the so-called Sandy relief package in January 2013.


Tuesday's All Things Considered on NPR aired two segments that took shots at President Donald Trump and Senator Ted Cruz's handling of the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey. Both reports featured talking heads from liberal organizations, but didn't explicitly mention their ideological stance. By contast, the segments clearly identified specific individual and groups as "conservative."