On Tuesday and Wednesday, Andrea Mitchell oddly claimed that President Donald Trump was using a "racial dog whistle" against Mississippi Democratic Senate nominee Mike Espy as the MSNBC host discussed Trump commenting that Espy's far-left politics do not "fit in" with his strongly conservative home state.



In a stunning moment of candor from ABC host George Stephanopoulos during Sunday’s This Week, the longtime Clinton flack lamented the media coverage Hillary Clinton received during the 2016 election. During the “powerhouse roundtable” discussion analyzing the media’s role in 2016 (yes, they’re still hung up on it), he was put off how media equalized Clinton and Donald Trump when it came to their wrongdoings.



On Monday, hosts of MSNBC’s morning lineup scoffed at the notion that some Americans still have faith in Congressman Nunes’s FISA memo, and even in the President himself. Some attributed the phenomenon to ignorance or foolishness, while others suggested that Trump supporters had been deceived by Russian bots on Twitter.



If one day of stupid wasn’t enough, MSNBC’s Hardball host Chris Matthews reiterated his concerns on Thursday night that President-elect Donald Trump has undermined the credibility of the news media to the point that he’s fearful people won’t believe movie times printed in newspapers.



Stephanie Cutter believes that Democratic Party presidential nominee Hillary Clinton really made a mistake in her Friday evening "basket of deplorables" statement about Republican nominee Donald Trump's supporters at a fundraiser in New York City when she limited the "basket" to "half" of them. On Sunday's Meet the Press on NBC, Cutter, the former 2012 Obama presidential campaign manager and short-lived cohost of CNN's failed attempt to revive Crossfire a couple of years ago, made it clear that she believes that far more than half, and perhaps all, of Trump's supporters belong in that "deplorables" basket containing people Mrs. Clinton described as "racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamophobic, you name it."



Tune into television coverage of the current presidential campaign, and you will undoubtedly hear from various pundits described as “former campaign strategists” and “political contributors” explaining the latest developments of the race.

But in many cases, these pundits -- though introduced as neutral experts on campaigns or party politics -- in fact have financial ties to the candidates they praise on the air, according to an article on The Intercept website by Lee Fang on the subject.



On Tuesday, Turner Broadcasting, the parent company of CNN,  started the process of cancelling several of the news network's series, including the reboot of Crossfire, and began laying off hundreds of employees. Chris Ariens at the TVNewser blog reported that "as many as 300, or 8%, of CNN's workforce is being cut." Ariens later noted that "Jane Velez Mitchell's nightly HLN show has been canceled, part of deep cuts at CNN."



On Tuesday, I published an article gleefully applauding the poor ratings CNN’s new Crossfire received in its first week back on the air.

After some reflection, I realize such sentiments went counter to my goal of having a truly fair and balanced media.



CNN has been hyping the return of Crossfire for months, but given the ratings the first week, it seems the public wasn't buying it.

Quite the contrary, numbers reported by The Wrap Monday show this not so new venture by the supposedly most trusted name in news is a bomb of epic proportions.



"You tell her.  No, YOU tell her!" . . . Richard Wolffe says that in 2012 an all-male group of senior Obama campaign people got together at a White Sox game and decided to fire deputy campaign manager Stephanie Cutter—but didn't have the "balls" to tell her.

Maybe so.  Then again, Wolffe—appearing on Morning Joe today to tout his new book on the Obama re-election campaign—also claimed that Cutter was "one of the single most effective" people in the Obama campaign?  Cutter? The nasty gaffe machine? View the video after the jump.



One of the worst things a reviewer can say about a television program is that "it has potential,” which usually means the show's not utilizing much of it. That situation was played out on Monday, when the Cable News Network brought back “Crossfire,” a conservative-liberal debate program that had been in television limbo for eight years.

Despite a newsworthy discussion topic -- the fate of Syria, where chemical weapons may have been used by the government on rebels -- and two well-known hosts, GOP former House speaker Newt Gingrich and Stephanie Cutter, deputy manager of President Barack Obama's re-election campaign, critics were not impressed by the first edition of the 30-minute weeknight series.



After more than eight years since the cancellation of “Crossfire” in June of 2005, the once-popular debate program returned to the Cable News Network on Wednesday as a segment of that evening's “Piers Morgan Live” with a spirited debate about the U.S. Supreme Court decisions regarding California's Proposition 8 and the dismissal of part of the Defense of Marriage Act.

The first new debate between conservatives and liberals featured Republican Newt Gingrich stating that the eight million voters who approved the proposition “have a pretty good reason to feel a little more alienated from Washington than they were yesterday.”