As the mid-terms approach, New York Times reporter Jeremy Peters played the electoral race card on the front page of Thursday edition: “In Midterm Vote, Fault Line Forms Concerning Race – Cues From President – Diverse Democratic Slate at a Time of Appeals to Racial Anxiety.” Peters really scraped around to dredge up what he called “racial subtext.”



It looks like the media has found their new messiah in Andrew Gillum, the Democratic nominee for Governor of Florida.  Gillum, the Bernie Sanders-backed Mayor of Tallahasse. Gillum pulled an upset by beating out establishment favorite Gwen Graham in Tuesday’s Democratic primary. Should he manage to win the general election, Gillum would become the first African-American Governor in the Sunshine State’s history.



So you say you’re weary of all that press coverage for Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the New York Democrat who defeated heavily favored incumbent Representative Joe Crowley in the party’s primary last month and is still trying to explain what a “Democratic socialist” does? If so, Time magazine has got the candidate just for you! And if she’s victorious on Election Day, she will become a hard-left governor for the state of Georgia. 



All three network morning shows on Wednesday celebrated “history being made” and “progress” after female Democratic candidates won primaries in several states on Tuesday. The broadcasts were particularly enthralled by African American state legislator Stacey Abrams winning Georgia’s Democratic gubernatorial primary and openly gay former sheriff Lupe Valdez winning the same contest in the state of Texas.



On Monday's Erin Burnett Outfront, and again on Tuesday's New Day, CNN ran a full report which devoted more than twice as much time to the more liberal candidate, Stacey Abrams, who is competing in Georgia's Democratic primary for governor without mentioning the GOP candidates at all. Additionally, the report left the impression that Abrams was not allowed to attend an event at the governor's mansion in 1991 because she was black even though, in fact, she was allowed into the event after the guest list was checked.



This past week, a Republican state legislator in Georgia made news after he posted arguably threatening messages on Facebook directed at a black Democratic former legislator who had complained about Confederate monuments. It was not surprising that the indefensible messages got the attention of race-obsessed MSNBC contributor and The Root politics editor Jason Johnson, but what was unexpected is that he oddly used the incident as a springboard to attack her for supporting a white candidate over a black candidate in the Democratic primary for governor.