Neil Young once sang, “It’s better to burn out than to fade away.” Happily, he didn’t burn out, but it would be nice if he’d get on with the fading away. It would save us the embarrassment of watching him try to be relevant. Ed Mazza of Huffington Post reported on Nov. 1 that the folk rock icon knocked some of the rust off his old protest song “Ohio” in a new concert video and aimed it at the NRA.



On Wednesday's CBS Evening News, Jan Crawford hyped the latest "dust-up between the musician and the politician," and underlined that "rare is the Republican candidate who isn't told to stop the music – even if...they paid licensing fees." She asked a GOP strategist, "Why is it it's always Republicans who are getting slammed by the musicians for using their songs?"



It's no secret that 1960s rock star turned environmentalist-musician Neil Young of Buffalo Springfield fame uses his celebrity status to push political agendas.

In recent years he's attacked oil and fracking, and soon Young will release an entire album entitled "The Monsanto Years" attacking genetically modified foods. 



On Thursday, Charlie Rose invited singer-songwriter Neil Young on his PBS show to promote his latest album and played a clip of the Woodstock-generation singer’s first single - basically an anthem against Big Oil called “Who is Going to Stand Up?” In the clip Young calls for the end of fossil fuel and fracking.



Music's Neil Young picked the wrong community to mess with.

After saying that Fort McMurray, Canada, as a result of oil production in the town, looks like Hiroshima after the 1945 nuclear attack, radio station Rock 97.9 has banned his music from its airwaves.



In the past rocker Neil Young has been about as consistent with his political opinions as Barack Obama has been on the his relationship with Rev. Wright. The mercurial Young was on the top of his game yesterday during the “Charlie Rose Show”. At one point during the interview Young appeared to regret past remarks that castigated President Bush:  
Criticizing the President and doing this and that and talking about things in the first person and getting right in there. It is like I got sucked into it. I was part of the turmoil myself. Which I wasn't happy about, and I am not happy about it now. But it happened.


Grunge and hippie-folk rocker Neil Young, who opposes President Bush's war in Iraq and released an album last year "Living with War" with a song called "Let's Impeach the President," nonetheless came to Bush's defense recently, saying he's a "leader" with perseverance. As Reuters reported (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080213/ap_en_mu/film_neil_young), in a conversation at the Sundance Film Festival, former band mate David Crosby said there should be a law that persons who can't pronounce the word "nuclear" shouldn't have control over nuclear weapons.