The entertainment world has readied the battlefield for the resistance with scripted and unscripted shows.



Saturday Night Live comedian Kate McKinnon admitted on NBC’s Tonight Show Tuesday that she had a public meltdown when she heard that Hillary Clinton mentioned her in her election memoir. “I sank to my knees,” McKinnon admitted to host Jimmy Fallon, “So I would always remember that moment,” she gushed.



The Washington Free Beacon watched so the rest of us didn’t have to. Ace reporter Conor Beck got the goods, and headlined them thusly: “Late-Night Comedy Shows Ignore Harvey Weinstein Sexual Harassment Allegations
Hosts pounced on similar allegations against Bill O'Reilly, Roger Ailes.” Here at NewsBusters Scott Whitlock was on the case as well, headlining: “Not Speaking Truth to Power: ‘Brave’ Late Night Hosts Skip Weinstein Sex Scandal.”



Failed presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is apparently still making media appearances to promote her election memoir, What Happened, that was released nearly a month ago. Wednesday night she was warmly received on NBC’s The Tonight Show, where the host asked her how she would’ve done things differently as President, and devoted an emotional “thank you notes” segment solely to Clinton, gushing over how “poised” “gracious” and accomplished Clinton was.



Rachel Maddow obviously doesn’t have to be hosting her liberal weeknight show on MSNBC to take advantage of any opportunity to slam President Donald Trump. Her latest chance came while she was a guest on the Thursday evening edition of NBC’s Tonight Show, when host Jimmy Fallon sang her praises “as the best person to talk to about all the tweets” the GOP occupant of the White House is posting about the national anthem controversy in National Football League games instead of the hurricane that has left Puerto Rico in tatters.



In what could be another contender for the Media Research Center’s annual DisHonors’ “Obamagasm Award,” Madonna admitted she still has “erotic dreams” about President Obama, ever since she met him in 2016. She shared this bit of unwelcome information with host Jimmy Fallon on Monday's The Tonight Show on NBC.



On Monday, the late night comedy show hosts from all three networks came out strongly against President Trump, for what they deemed was an inadequate and “shameful” reaction the violence in Charlottesville. While NBC’s Tonight Show host Jimmy Fallon didn’t veer into crass and extreme rhetoric like NBC’s other, more colorful late-night host Seth Meyers did, Fallon still called out Trump for his “shameful” response to Charlottesville. ABC’s Jimmy Kimmel also made several jokes claiming Trump was a member of the KKK.



Jimmy Fallon has a funny way of approaching his late night gig. The former Saturday Night Live star thinks it’s all about making people laugh at the end of the day. It’s not divisive, or corrosive. The “Fallon” method treats guests like … guests. Politics are fair game, but it’s not what matters most.



The liberal media will never forgive Tonight Show host Jimmy Fallon for momentarily treating Donald Trump like a normal guest when the then-presidential candidate appeared on the show last September. New York Times culture reporter Dave Itzkoff returned to the subject in a long profile of Fallon, with particular focus on the crime of Fallon playfully mussing Trump’s hair as a harmful humanization of the man, and implying that fateful incident caused Fallon’s show to be overtaken in the ratings by more left-wing ideological competition like the vulgar Stephen Colbert. The online headline: “Jimmy Fallon Was on Top of the World. Then Came Trump.”



Just a few days after CBS’s Stephen Colbert unleashed a vulgar tirade against President Trump, a new study has documented just how unfriendly late night TV has been to the new Commander-in-Chief. The Center for Media and Public Affairs at George Mason University counted an incredible 1,060 jokes directed against Trump during the President’s first 100 days in office. That’s more than ten times as many barbs as aimed at all Democrats — combined — during the same period (95), and considerably more than both Barack Obama and Bill Clinton received during the entire first year of their presidencies (936 and 440 jokes, respectively).



Although election night was the beginning of an upward surge in popularity for Late Show host Stephen Colbert, he found the prospect of announcing a Trump victory comparable to forcing his audience to watch an execution. 



The New York Times’ John Koblin made the front of Business Day Monday with yet another fawning article from the NYT about how the Trump presidency has given a liberal television comedian a new lease on ratings popularity: “How Colbert Finally Got on a Roll.” It’s basically the same article the Times has been running for two months: