On Tuesday, NBC’s Today devoted two full reports to President Obama appearing on Jerry Seinfeld’s web series Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee. The first report came late in the 7 a.m. ET hour, with co-host Carson Daly proclaiming: “President Obama and Jerry Seinfeld take a little spin on the South Lawn in a 1963 Corvette before they sit down for a candid conversation about life in the White House....[which] focuses more on the ‘lighter side of the presidency’...an opportunity to ‘pull back the curtain.’”


While interviewing fellow comedian Jeff Ross on his show Real Time, Bill Maher brought up Jerry Seinfeld's recent criticism of political correctness.

Maher and Ross went back and forth on the topic, praising Seinfeld’s defense of “comedy as an art form” and decrying “generic,” “watered-down” comedy that adheres to the politically correct standard.


Picking up on comedian Jerry Seinfeld’s concern “there’s a creepy PC thing out there” on college campuses in which comedians are condemned for jokes which convey stereotypes, Bernard Goldberg called out Seinfeld for failing to recognize liberals are behind the “authoritarian” speech code.


New York Times culture reporter Dave Itzkoff weighs in on comedian Jerry Seinfeld calling the younger generation too politically correct for comedy with an odd, condescending criticism: "Perhaps some of Mr. Quinn’s working-class bona fides will rub off on Mr. Seinfeld, whose recent remarks on political correctness have seen his man-of-the-people status called into question."


Alex Wagner, along with her three liberal guests, ripped Jerry Seinfeld on her MSNBC program on Wednesday, for his blast at "creepy" political correctness. Wagner hinted that Seinfeld had "fallen behind the times." New York magazine's Annie Lowrey mocked his critique: "I kind of roll my eyes at Jerry Seinfeld. You know, he's a billionaire – like I don't feel sorry for him if people don't laugh hard enough at his jokes."


After comedian Jerry Seinfeld told ESPN radio that political correctness on college campuses was hurting comedy, Wednesday’s CBS This Morning was the only network news broadcast to report on the topic. Fill-in co-host Jeff Glor declared: “Jerry Seinfeld thinks young people today are too politically correct for his comedy....The former sitcom star is raising some controversy, calling out millennials for not being able to laugh.”


Jerry Seinfeld blasted political correctness on the early Wednesday edition of NBC's Late Night With Seth Meyers. Seinfeld cited how he recently got a negative reaction to a "gay French king" joke: "I can imagine a time when people say, 'Well, that's offensive to suggest that a gay person moves their hands in a flourishing motion, and you now need to apologize.' I mean, there's a creepy PC thing out there that really bothers me."


Stand-up comedy legend Jerry Seinfeld cracked up the Saturday Night Live 40th anniversary audience with a joke at Brian Williams’ expense: “I just found out that one of the original cast members in 1975 was Brian Williams.”


Julia Louis-Dreyfus - aka the actress best known as Elaine on the smash hit "Seinfeld" - dropped two f-bombs on CNN Friday night.

Rather ironically, the second one came as she described to host Piers Morgan what kind of America she wanted for her kids (video follows with transcript and commentary, extreme vulgarity warning):


The gay blog On Top reported that “comedian” Janeane Garofalo is the latest in a string of celebrities and activists suggesting Michele Bachmann’s therapist husband Marcus must be gay, including Cher, Jon Stewart, Jerry Seinfeld, and sex columnist/”It Gets Better” bully Dan Savage. Cher even said she wanted to strangle him.

This Marcus-is-gay line has also been a regular trope of liberal talk radio, from openly gay Stephanie Miller to Randi Rhodes to even Ron “Junior” Reagan, who knows something on this subject of aspersions from his ballet-dancing days.


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I was flipping through the tube last night, and found myself in an all-too familiar situation: watching reruns of Seinfeld.  Sure, you could chalk it up to my lack of a basic cable package, or it could be due to the fact that I'm no longer able to stomach Letterman's increasingly senile, liberal spewage (and Leno is sort of hit-or-miss these days).  I would argue, however, that one reason stands above the rest:Seinfeld is honest.

The truth is that Seinfeld reflects the worst among us. It is made up of a memorable cast, all of whom play the most self-serving people you could ever meet. Self-absorbed, vain and often underhanded, the show is a perfect embodiment of many involved with the entertainment industry.  You've got to love its transparency. Unlike James Cameron (who is just as materialistic and self-serving as a George Costanza), you never have to worry about the show sermonizing the politically correct cause du jour.

Funnily enough, it is Seinfeld's lack of a soapbox that spurs me to take a good hard look at myself more than any other show on television. How often do you find yourself disgusted at the selfishness of George or Jerry, only to realize that you've most likely acted similarly (if not identically) at one point or another?


HBO's hit series "Curb Your Enthusiasm" has pushed the comedic envelope for many years, but what happened in Sunday's episode was so disgraceful it's already received comment from the Catholic League's Bill Donohue.

The set-up is the show's star and producer Larry David is taking some medication that is making him urinate quite forcefully.

It's so powerful that while urinating in his assistant's bathroom, he accidentally splashed some of it on a picture of Jesus Christ hanging on a nearby wall.

This prompted the following response from Donohue (video embedded below the fold h/t Big Hollywood):