New York Times White House correspondent Katie Rogers latched on to a minor Trump quote controversy and elevated it to Orwellian importance in Thursday’s edition: Did Trump call former actress Meghan Markle, now wife to Prince Harry and called the Duchess of Sussex, “nasty?” The online edition of the paper upped the significance of the silly spat into a battle over ultimate truth: “An Orwellian Tale? Trump Denies, Then Confirms, ‘Nasty’ Comments About Meghan Markle.” Rogers squeezed the maximum snideness out of the snit.



Following the Senate’s confirmation vote to elevate Brett Kavanaugh to an associate justice of the Supreme Court, a radical pack of leftist protesters descended on the highest court in the land. Together, some scaled the statues while others clawed and banged on the historic building's massive bronze doors. By all reasonable accounts, it was a raging mob but the liberal media despised that term. During Wednesday’s edition of his show, Fox News’ Tucker Carlson chastised the media for their nonsense.



Dan Rather appeared on CNN Tonight on Friday. Host Don Lemon engaged the broadcaster in a discussion centered around who could be more outraged at the Trump presidency. Rather took the lead when he called the current administration “straight out of Orwell.”



For years, Michiko Kakutani was the most feared and revered New York Times book critic. Now the reviewer becomes the reviewed with her new book with a self-explanatory title: The Death of Truth – Notes on Falsehood in the Age of Trump. On the plus side, it’s short. Yet this slim, 173-page undersized hardback still manages to be a slow read, dense and repetitive. The widely read Kakutani uses boringly familiar quotes from predictable wells of anti-totalitarian wisdom like Hannah Arendt and George Orwell to attack Trump and the new GOP for abandoning truth, reason, even common decency.



Over an 18-hour period spanning two days, anchors on MSNBC and CNN all read from the same script as they warned viewers that President Trump’s typical criticism of the liberal media during a Tuesday address was akin to the authoritarian regime described in George Orwell’s dystopian novel 1984.



Hysterical liberals are rushing to buy dystopian novels like 1984 and The Handmaid's Tale, regarding them as playbooks for the new Trump administration, and the New York Times is eagerly validating their fears: "...in recent months, [Handmaid's Tale author Margaret] Atwood has been hearing from anxious readers who see eerie parallels between the novel’s oppressive society and the current Republican administration’s policy goals of curtailing reproductive rights." But the NYT skipped a vital alternate reason why Handmaid is selling more of late: It's coming to Hulu this year.



Following the lead of CNN’s Brian Stelter, Thursday’s Situation Room touted the spike of sales in the book 1984 and strongly hinted that Americans view the Trump administration as the real-life version of Big Brother portrayed in George Orwell’s classic.



If you have some free time on your hands, you might enjoy MRCTV's interview with Jonah Goldberg on his book The Tyranny of Cliches. If you've ever found it maddening that the media would present an issue like abortion with one side as hardline ideological conservatives and the other side as non-ideological humanitarians, you might be ready for Goldberg's thesis -- liberals have a bad habit of pretending to be non-ideological. He tells MRCTV's Dan Joseph they even lie to themselves.

In the interview, Goldberg recommends George Orwell’s 1946 essay “Politics And the English Language” as one of the great writings of the 20th century and a starting point for his book and the thesis that the media and the popular culture stack the deck against conservatism: (video below)



Now that the election is over and President-elect Barack Obama successfully defeated Sen. John McCain, unrepentant domestic terrorist William Ayers has decided to break his silence and cash-in by promoting his books.

Although he described himself as "an unwitting and unwilling participant thrust up on stage" for the 2008 presidential election, he demonstrated his opportunistic traits by appearing at the All Souls Unitarian Church in Washington, D.C. on Nov. 17 to promote his books "City Kids, City Schools: More Reports from the Front Row" and "City Kids, City Teachers: Reports from the Front Row." He criticized his portrayal by the media, calling it a "dishonest narrative."



"War is Peace; Freedom is Slavery; Ignorance is Strength" -- Slogan of the ruling party in George Orwell's "1984"

With the health care proposal she is about to introduce, Hillary Clinton adds another spooky non sequitur to the list: Compulsory Coverage is Choice. Will the MSM take notice?