Trump is right about one thing. The public is sick of traditional politicians who make promises but don't deliver, while driving up the debt and lining their pockets. But whose fault is that? Ultimately it's the voters' fault, because they are the ones who put them in office, demanding more from government than it can, or should, deliver and demanding too little of themselves.

Welcome to the United States of Trump.


The kids in The Family Circus blame their misbehavior on gremlins with names like Ida Know and Not Me. The Week’s Damon Linker believes grown-up conservatives do something similar when they deny what Linker sees as the plain truth: that they run the Republican party.

In a Tuesday column, Linker contended that the right-wing “counter-establishment” that first gained a share of power in 1981 now “simply is the conservative and Republican establishment…[But] because its ideological outlook was formed when it was out of power, this establishment seems incapable of thinking about itself as an establishment.” He charged that "by thinking of themselves as perennially outside the Republican power-structure, members of the counter-establishment conveniently exempt themselves from the need to admit and learn from their own mistakes. It's always someone else's fault.”


A new analysis by the Media Research Center finds Trump continued to receive the vast majority of TV news coverage throughout the month of January, leading up to tonight’s crucial Iowa caucuses. An examination of all campaign coverage on the ABC, CBS and NBC evening newscasts from January 1 through January 31 finds Trump received nearly 157 minutes of airtime, or almost 60 percent of the total coverage of GOP presidential candidates. With January now in the books, Trump’s entire campaign has thus far received a whopping 736 minutes of coverage on the three evening newscasts, nearly five times as much coverage as his nearest competitor.


All three cable networks had extensive coverage on Sunday night for the eve of the 2016 Iowa caucuses and with Hardball host Chris Matthews among the cast of characters on MSNBC, there was no shortage of notable comments ranging Matthews admitting that he has “butterflies out there in the locker room” ahead of the vote to gushing that he “like[s] Hillary personally and politically.”


On the Iowa caucus eve edition of ABC’s World News Tonight, Republican campaign correspondent Tom Llamas had another lead story that focused heavily on frontrunner Donald Trump, but also featured a bizarre question to Republican Senator Ted Cruz (Tex.) as he was leaving an Iowa church about praying for his opponents like Donald Trump and fellow Senator Marco Rubio (Fl.).


Washington Post drama critic Peter Marks made a splash in their Sunday Arts section touting how America's musical-theatre sector is taking on the "nativist wave" coming from Donald Trump. From a revival of West Side Story to the hip-hop Founding Father musical Hamilton, actors are taking to the stage to underscore how American the newest Americans are:


On a special hour-long Sunday edition of CNN’s Inside Politics, panelist and National Journal writer Ron Fournier resumed his strong disdain for Republican frontrunner Donald Trump by lambasting him as having “bigoted” and “sexist rhetoric” for a man who makes “irresponsible comments” which exhibit “his shallowness on policy.”


Once upon a time, Martin Longman didn’t think Republicans were so bad, but that was before the Tea Party, before the Iraq war, before Fox News became a major force. The Washington Monthly blogger detailed his decades of disillusionment in a Tuesday post.

According to Longman, events which eroded his belief that Republicans were “decent people” included the “excesses of the Gingrich Revolution”; the “giant looting exercise” that GOPers allegedly executed during George W. Bush’s administration; and John McCain’s selection of Sarah Palin. He also argued that “Donald Trump actually is an ideological match for the modern conservative movement” given that movement conservatives are motivated less by philosophical principle than by “1) fear 2) hatred 3) greed and 4) a need to be led…Trump encapsulates those almost perfectly.”


New York Times media reporter Jonathan Mahler indulged in a celebration of a rival paper, the New York Daily News, and its recent hard turn to the left, as shown in the tabloid’s spurt of vulgar anti-conservative headlines – like the one calling NRA president Wayne LaPierre a terrorist – that have gone viral on social media, in “Drop Dead? Not The Newly Relevant Daily News." Mahler took us inside the liberal hive mind, buzzing with giddy self-congratulation over yet another puerile attack on Republicans, while dutifully reprinting the controversial covers that made liberals go giddy


Kevin Drum at Mother Jones highlighted an exchange about Trump overcoverage on Twitter between MSNBC host Chris Hayes and Washington Post economics correspondent Jim Tankersley. Liberals and journalists were disappointed that a network like MSNBC would highlight Trump’s quickly assembled event to compete with the presidential debate. Hayes waved a white flag about the need to fill the public appetite for “spectacle.”


MSNBC is no fan of conservative Texas Republican Ted Cruz, and the network has done it's share of boosting Donald Trump. So perhaps it's no surprise that it's top story this morning is a headline screaming out Trump's trollish line about the Cuban-American being an "anchor baby" from Canada.


After devoting nearly ten minutes of air time to Donald Trump’s boycott of the Republican debate on Thursday’s evening newscasts (rather than preview the debate itself), on Friday morning, the three broadcast networks offered over 21 minutes of political coverage continuing to hype Trump’s absence while only managing 7 minutes for the GOP contenders who participated in the event.