On Saturday's PoliticsNation show, MSNBC host Al Sharpton presided over a discussion of the Donald Trump administration delaying the release of the new $20 bill replacing President Andrew Jackson's image with iconic anti-slavery activist Harriet Tubman. As the group saw the delay as being racially motivated, Sharpton made clear that he does not know the difference between Andrew Jackson and Andrew Johnson as he TWICE claimed Jackson succeeded President Abraham LIncoln.



It should be an obvious concept that during a New Day segment called a “Reality Check,” the reporter should make sure that the information is complete and accurate. Unfortunately, that wasn’t the case on Monday morning, when CNN Senior Political Analyst John Avlon went out of his way in an attempt to connect the terrorist shooting in New Zealand last Friday with President Trump.



The death of former president George Herbert Walker Bush created a calm oasis of civil discourse, if only for a couple of minutes. It was appropriate to salute this man’s kindness and statesmanship, even when you disagreed with him passionately, as many conservatives did. And yet, it’s a bit odd that pundits suddenly remember the kinder, gentler noblesse oblige of Bush’s presidency. This from the same industry that mocked him when he was in office.



On Fox and Friends Sunday, frequent guest and Harvard Law professor emeritus Alan Dershowitz slammed former President Bill Clinton and others on the left for their willingness to "mainstream" racist, anti-Semitic Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, responding to their presence on stage together at singer Aretha Franklin's funeral.



For much of the day on Friday and into the weekend, various hosts on both CNN and MSNBC were hard at work smearing Fox News host Laura Ingraham as someone who uses her show to promote "racist" and "white supremacist" views as they reacted to a commentary she gave on The Ingraham Angle show in which she advocated for merit-based immigration and lamented dramatic "massive demographic" changes.



In the aftermath of House Speaker Paul Ryan's announcement that he will retire from Congress, amid the speculation about who might replace him as top Republican in the House, the Washington Post ran an AP story by Alan Fram which repeats the debunked claims that House Majority Whip Steve Scalise was a speaker for a David Duke-founded white supremacist group without even acknowledging any of the evidence that he was not. In fact, at this point, in spite of media silence, there's more evidence that prominent Democrats have directly associated with Louis Farrakhan than there is that Scalise was ever connected to Duke.



On Friday morning, on two different shows, CNN hosts inserted David Duke into the illegal immigration discussion by reading a tweet in which the former KKK leader praised President Donald Trump for dismissing the term "Dreamers" being used by liberals to bolster the image of illegal immigrants who were brought into the country as children. 



For all of the talk about collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia, there seemed to be a bit of collusion on Wednesday between the cable news channels as they dissected the President’s State of the Union speech.



On Thursday's Deadline: White House, Republican-leaning MSNBC most Nicolle Wallace was still fretting over Roy Moore's GOP primary victory in Alabama as she repeated her claims from yesterday that some of his past comments are "too offensive" to be shown on television. She also worried that his candidacy for Senate signals that the Republican party is "on a path to extinction."



In a pre-recorded interview aired on Friday's PBS NewsHour, PBS host Judy Woodruff asked guest Hillary Clinton if she believes President Donald Trump is "racist," and then did not challenge her when she claimed that Trump had "accepted the support of David Duke," and that he "has not condemned the neo-Nazis and the self-proclaimed white supremacists." Substitute host Hari Sreenivasan also teased that, in part two of the interview to be aired next week, Clinton had blamed "well-executed voter suppression of African-American voters" for her loss in Wisconsin.

 



In an article posted yesterday, Salon politics writer Chauncey DeVega trashed Republican Rep. Steve Scalise as a "bigot" and accused the Republican party of being a "sociopathic" entity that has "weaponized" the Scalise shooting and is "drunk on conspiracy theories and other hallucinogenic beliefs." He also repeated the discredited claim that Scalise spoke to a "white supremacist" group in 2002, and even went so far as to claim that he was an "honored guest" for the racist group.



On Wednesday's Fox and Friends, as Fox News producer Greg Pergram reported in by phone in the aftermath of the attack on congressional Republicans in Alexandria, Virginia, he incorrectly recalled that it was the KKK that Scalise was accused of meeting with, when in reality the debunked accusation was that he spoke to a white nationalist group that was founded by David Duke. Additionally, Pergram failed to inform viewers that, even though Scalise issued an apology, the central claim that Scalise spoke to Duke's group was undermined both by a flyer from the event that did not list Scalise as a speaker, and by a man who helped organize the event who claimed that he invited Scalise to speak at a separate gathering that was not part of the white nationalist convention.