The Washington Post's Express tabloid carried an AP Supreme Court nomination dispatch as its cover story. “Trump savors the reveal” was the headline. AP reporters Catherine Lucey and Zeke Miller began a story on this “Supreme show” with all of the president’s current political headaches.



The American people don't trust the establishment press, as seen in a Pew Research poll result released Thursday showing that only 8 percent of Americans have "a great deal of confidence" that the media will "act in the best interests of the public." Here is one more example showing why this attitude is entirely justified: The Secret Service, after a thorough investigation in response to anonymous, media-promoted smears, is reporting that it found "no information that would indicate" that a misconduct allegation against withdrawn VA nominee Ronny Jackson is true.



When President Trump announced them in early January, many in the liberal media thought that the Fake News Awards were a bluff and he wouldn’t go through with them. But after having previously been postponed, Trump unveiled the “winners” Wednesday night. Out of the top 10 instances of fake news, CNN was sloppy enough to win four awards with the top spot going to The New York Times. The awards twice noted a Media Research Center study that showed 90 percent of the media’s coverage of him was negative.



The truth about Fusion GPS's involvement with creating, promoting, and disseminating the infamous Trump-Russia dossier has slowly emerged during the past four weeks. Yet, based on site searches, the Associated Press and New York Times have not published a single substantive, genuinely related in-house story in over four weeks.



On Monday afternoon, some journalists provided another small nail in the coffin of the media’s credibility when they lost collective minds on Twitter over White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders asking reporters to share what they’re most thankful for this Thanksgiving. Sanders still allowed reporters to ask questions and most responded with thoughtful answers, but a few ignored it (including the Associated Press’s Zeke Miller and Washington Post’s Jenna Johnson). 



Time Magazine published a side piece by Michael Scherer and Zeke J. Miller accompanying its primary story on Miller's interview with the President. In "Donald Trump After Hours," the pair observed that "At the dessert course, he (Trump) gets two scoops of vanilla ice cream with his chocolate cream pie, instead of the single scoop for everyone else." Hard as it might be to believe, some unhinged members of the press have pounced on this sentence as proof of Trump's less than exemplary character.



Here's an episode which indicates that many reporters in the establishment press expect the worst from Donald Trump, and can't wait to put it out there when they think they have it. On Friday, when Time Magazine political reporter Zeke Miller didn't immediately see the bust of Martin Luther King in the White House's Oval Office where he expected to see it, his knee-jerk assumption was that it was no longer there. So he tweeted that it was gone, with no indication that he first attempted to confirm with anyone in a position to know that it had been removed. Sensing a golden opportunity, others in the press accepted Miller's non-observation and freely retweeted it.

 



Time.com's Zeke Miller tweeted yesterday that a "reporter" asked recently declared presidential candidate Marco Rubio of Florida the following question: "Is 43 old enough to be president?" Meanwhile, two weeks ago, a column at Time.com claimed that Hillary Clinton is "biologically primed to be a leader." Seriously.

Since he either can't or won't tell us who asked the question, we're unable to determine if the "reporter" to whom Miller referred was asking the question because he or she doesn't know the Constitution or was trying to bait Rubio into giving an answer implicitly or explicitly criticizing other candidates. It would be worth knowing, because the first answer betrays ignorance, while the second reveals bias and a likely double standard in interviewing. Miller's tweet, which includes Rubio's priceless answer, is after the jump:



The 2015 edition of the Time’s 100 most influential people was released Thursday and, not surprisingly, featured an entry on Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. Also to no one’s surprise, the entry was glowing in admiration for her as Laurene Powell Jobs, tasked with profiling Clinton, glowed over how she “is one of America’s greatest modern creations.”



By yesterday afternoon, the Obama administration recognized that it had a serious problem on its hands. Zeke Miller at Time.com reported that 2008 presidential campaign manager and longtime adviser David Axelord's book revealed that, in Miller's words, "Barack Obama misled Americans for his own political benefit when he claimed in the 2008 election to oppose same sex marriage for religious reasons." Obama never opposed same-sex marriage, but acted on advice from Axelrod and others to act as if he did during the campaign.

Axelrod's claim generated enough coverage that Team Obama knew that even the Associated Press, aka the Administration's Press, was going to have to do some kind of story on his adviser's revelation. So how to do damage control without creating the kind of stir which would force the network broadcasters to inform low-information voters of the core deception? That's easy. Throw all pretenses of presidential dignity out the window and go to (holy moly) Buzzfeed.



In a new book, Obama 2008 campaign manager and longtime Obama adviser David Axelrod reveals that, in the words of Zeke J. Miller at Time.com, "Barack Obama misled Americans for his own political benefit when he claimed in the 2008 election to oppose same sex marriage for religious reasons."

The subheadline at Miller's coverage calls it "A striking admission of political dishonesty from the keeper of the Obama flame." In my view, given that David Axelrod wouldn't make such an admission without permission, it's also a juvenile "Nyah-nyah, we fooled you, and you can't do anything about it!" taunt. Additional excerpts from Miller's article follow the jump (HT Michael Walsh at PJ Media; bolds are mine throughout this post):



On Monday afternoon, CNN’s Wolf covered the controversy surrounding President Obama’s playing of golf on a Hawaii golf course that forced an Army couple about to be married there to move their wedding during which CNN’s Chris Moody called the optics of the move “hilariously bad.”

Following a panel discussion on the 2016 presidential campaign, substitute host Brianna Keilar introduced the topic and after some background on what happened, Keilar and Time’s Zeke Miller did their best to defend the President and the White House, pointing out that there was “no way that the President” or the White House knew of this decision beforehand by the golf course.