Sunday’s New York Times Magazine explored “25 Songs That Tell Us Where Music Is Going.” Part of the answer was there were too many white girls badly trying to appropriate black music, singling out Katy Perry and Taylor Swift, because "some white artists and listeners love black culture without necessarily seeing black people, their politics, or their pain."



Wesley Morris, the New York Times critic at large with a focus (or obsession) with race in entertainment, declared a “white supremacy summer” on television and in the movies in a long essay posted Wednesday, “In Movies and on TV, Racism Made Plain.” Earlier headlines were even more provocative: “In Virginia and on TV, A Supremacist Summer,” and the URL suggests that the phrase “white hot supremacist summer” made a headline appearance as well.



It's Week 2 of the NFL season, and the controversy over San Francisco 49er's quarterback Colin Kaepernick’s refusal to stand for the National Anthem still simmers among those die-hard sports fans in the liberal news and opinion pages of the New York Times. Times critic-at-large Wesley Morris had a think-piece at the front of the Times Sunday Magazine, “Stand and Deliver,” while another Times writer fawned over the QB under this headline: "Colin Kaepernick Finds His Voice.”



New York Times movie critics Manohla Dargis, A.O. Scott, and  Wesley Morris blessed readers with an even sillier than usual Oscar racism recap in Tuesday's paper: “Watching a White Academy Squirm.” 



Reporting for CBS This Morning on Monday, Entertainment Tonight host Kevin Frazier offered rave reviews of Sunday’s Oscars pushing one liberal agenda item after another: “You know, there was no way last night's broadcast could be just about the awards....the real spotlight was on Oscars lack of diversity and the show's host Chris Rock owned the night.”



One reason, I'm guessing, for still subscribing to The Boston Globe is to laugh at "self-loathing" black conservatives...even in Quentin Tarantino movie reviews. Globe film critic Wesley Morris is at is again. On NPR in May 2011, Morris hailed "The Fast and The Furious" movies as very "progressive" and "equal-opportunity shallow." When challenged on it, Morris shot darts instead at "The Blind Side."

In his Christmas Day review of the new movie "Django Unchained," Morris found "a hard mix of meticulous cartoonishness and unexpected power," especially in the "house Negro" Samuel L. Jackson, who apparently channels Clarence Thomas, Alan Keyes, Herman Cain, and Michael Steele:



Two years ago, Time critic Richard Corliss wrote an article that clearly must have resonated at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The Oscar telecast was sinking in the ratings, he wrote, because the nominees were largely unwatched by the masses. It used to be that the Best Picture prize went to mainstream box-office hits. "Now when the nominations come out, people try to catch up with the finalists, but it's almost like homework."

The 2010 Oscar nominations clearly signal that Hollywood is trying to return to a broader vision of the Oscars, as something more than an insular critics’ circle that likes only the self-consciously arty and obscure. That signal came most obviously with the announcement that there would be ten nominees for Best Picture. That list hadn’t seen 10 nominations since 1943, when the winner was "Casablanca."

Arty films that almost nobody has seen are still there – like "An Education." But arty blockbusters are there as well, like "Avatar" – current box office gross: $601 million -- and the animated film "Up," with $293 million. (By contrast, two years ago, the Best Picture box office leader was "Juno" – at $85 million when the nominations came out.)