Taxpayer-funded PBS and NPR are now in the polling business with Marist College, and like the other networks, their polls are often used to support putting heat on Republicans. On Wednesday, they announced they had found a majority of Americans were disappointed with the president’s responsive to the violence in Charlottesville. PBS then ignored their own finding that 62 percent favored leaving Confederate statues in place, while only 27 percent want them removed. NPR reported it once, and then insisted that had nothing to do with Charlottesville.

Buried in the weeds: They also asked if Americans approve or disapprove of Black Lives Matter: 50 percent disapproved, and only 33 percent approved. They even asked about approval of Antifa, but few had heard of them yet: Five percent approved, 24 percent disapproved.


An invitation to a fancy state dinner at the White House clearly isn’t seen as an obvious sign that a journalist is “in the tank” for President Obama. Friday night’s state dinner for the presidents of five Nordic countries drew two nightly-news anchors – David Muir of ABC and Lester Holt of NBC – three, if you count Fox Special Report anchor Bret Baier.

Muir and ABC News vice president Robin Sproul were probably hoping the Obamas were too polite to notice that just last year, Muir editorialized that an “elegant state dinner” went forward while Baltimore was shut down over rioting!


NPR's Scott Horsley acted as a stenographer for President Obama on Tuesday's Morning Edition, as he reported on the Democrat's Monday slam of the news media. Horsley played up how the President "spoke as a politician who's been on the receiving end of tough questions; but also as a somewhat cranky news consumer who thinks too many reporters are falling down on the job." The correspondent also turned to a talking head who backed up Obama's criticism of the press.


NPR's Scott Horsley carried water for the Obama administration on Thursday's All Things Considered as he covered the President's green energy executive order. All of Horsley's soundbites during the segment came from the Democratic chief executive and two boosters of his latest environmental policy. True to form, the slanted NPR correspondent failed to include any criticism of the order in his report.


There wasn’t a lot of fact-checking of Obama’s State of the Union address, but NPR promised they would be eyeing the factual claims. In a ten-minute segment on Wednesday's Morning Edition, they investigated claims they insisted what Obama said was “true,” if a matter of political dispute.

But in "fact-checking" Sen. Joni Ernst's GOP response, NPR's Scott Horsley played a slippery game with the estimates of jobs created by the Keystone pipeline proposal.


NPR is again feeling Barack Obama’s pain, with a Friday All Things Considered story they headlined “For Obama, August Is the Cruelest Month.” Even the French are mocking his time off. The media now insist Obama is victimized by bad news, not that he's done anything wrong that would create bad news.

His approval ratings are lowest in August, suggested NPR White House correspondent Scott Horsley, but never fear, “the President's numbers have tended to rebound soon after Labor Day.”  Horsley insisted that Obama has vacationed far less than George W. Bush:


On Monday's Morning Edition, NPR's Scott Horsley boosted President Obama's push for new gun control measures at the Sunday memorial service for the victims of the mass shooting at the Washington Navy Yard. Horsley played four soundbites of Obama bemoaning the apparent lack of action on this issue, while including just one clip from the NRA's Wayne LaPierre.

The correspondent also asserted that two pro-gun control state legislators in Colorado were "recalled by voters after a campaign fueled by the National Rifle Association." In reality, gun control supporters spent seven times more money in the recall than gun rights supporters, as reported by CBS This Morning earlier in September.


President Obama is taking questions from the news media. In the comments section, tell us what you would ask if you were a White House reporter.

I'll be covering the questions journalists ask of the president below the page break. As always, I'm doing this on the fly, so transcriptions of questions may be imperfect:


NPR's Scott Horsley filed an unashamedly slanted report on Thursday's Morning Edition about the former national field director for Obama's reelection campaign trying to boost voter turnout among Hispanics in Texas as a means of helping Democratic candidates. The only talking heads that Horsley featured during the segment were the former Obama campaign official, Jeremy Bird, and a fellow of the left-wing Center for American Progress.

The correspondent mentioned only in passing that "some Texas Republicans are skeptical that Democrats will be competitive in their state anytime soon."


Scott Horsley's report on Wednesday's All Things Considered could have mistaken for a three-and-half minute ad from a pro-Obama super PAC. Horsley played up how "Mr. Obama often tempers his speeches with a dose of modesty about what government can and can't do" and how the President "pushes back strongly against the anti-government rhetoric of his GOP opponents."

The NPR correspondent also sympathetically noted that "part of the President's challenge...is persuading Americans that the people government is taking care of really are our own." Horsley filled the segment with talking points from Obama's campaign and with soundbites from the Democrat and his campaign, and failed to include any from his opponents.


Like all the other Obama-friendly media, NPR on its evening show All Things Considered devoted time to putting Obama’s “you didn’t build that” outburst “in context.” Co-host Audie Cornish promised, “In a few minutes, we'll listen to exactly what the president said in context.” They offered Obama a 70-second soundbite.

But first, Cornish turned to NPR correspondent Scott Horsley, who spent 90 seconds unloading how the businesses the Romney campaign is using to rebut Obama’s remark are all beneficiaries of government largesse:


On Friday's Morning Edition, NPR's Scott Horsley favored Obama supporters in his report on the battle for Virginia's electoral votes, playing three soundbites from them, versus only one from a Republican official in the commonwealth. Horsley also played up how "the demographics are shifting in the Democrats' direction."

The correspondent led the segment by noting the Democratic incumbent's planned stop at a high School in Virginia Beach. He wasted little time before playing clips of a recent graduate and his mother, who are both supporters of the President: