The New York Times headline echoed its hostile lead story Wednesday: “Trump Exerts His Power With a Spree of Pardons – Critics Denounce Clemency for Blagojevich, Milken and Kerik as Undeserved” by Michael Shear and Maggie Haberman. Catch the echo of “crime spree” in the headline? "But the president’s announcements on Tuesday were mostly aimed at wiping clean the slates of rich, powerful and well-connected white men." But the Times took a different tone when it was Barack Obama making controversial pardons and commutations:



Media coverage of Sunday's Daytona 500 NASCAR race accused President Donald Trump of politicizing this huge sporting spectacle and using it as a campaign appearance. Whether it was the Associated Press, The Guardian, or New York Times, the disdain for both the President and the fan base was out in full force from the left-wing media.



The New York Times, which constantly lambastes Trump for spreading lies, is now critical of Trump for bringing actual news to public attention: “Trump, Once a Fan of Stop-and-Frisk, Uses It to Cudgel Bloomberg.” Notice the word choice in the online headlines: “Trump Takes On Bloomberg and Once Again Hijacks a News Cycle -- Like an assignment editor at a tabloid newspaper, the president poured accelerant on a negative story and got it trending on Twitter and cable news.” “Hijacks a news cycle” by pointing out controversial comments made by a potential rival?



New York Times Peter Baker’s lead-story “news analysis” on Tuesday suggested revelations from an unpublished memoir by Donald Trump’s former national security advisor, John Bolton, could be a Watergate-like “smoking gun” -- or at least would in normal political times.  Baker eagerly and perhaps prematurely made his “smoking gun” case: “John Bolton’s Account Upends Trump’s Denials, but Will It Upend Trump?”



While journalists live in their own media echo chamber most of the time, occasionally they’ll get a healthy dose of reality when they share their self-aggrandizing opinions on social media. That happened to New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman this past weekend when she whined about President Trump defending Iranian journalists against their totalitarian government.



The liberal media seem to only care about propping up billionaires when the views of the rich align with their own. The New York Times did an entire puff piece elevating the candidacy of liberal billionaire 2020 candidate Michael Bloomberg, with little criticism.



On Wednesday’s Cuomo Prime Time after the House vote to impeach President Trump, CNN weekend host Michael Smerconish took a shot at the American voters by kvetching that, according to polls, support for impeachment has gone down. And as for why, he surmised that it’s perhaps because Americans have incorrectly deemed it too partisan, decided to tune it out, and that they’re too busy to truly understand the severity of Trump’s actions.



The New York Times has gotten itself mired in more controversy and embarrassment of its own making while spending the last week desperately trying to put a negative spin on President Trump’s recent executive order to fight anti-Semitism on college campuses: "The order will effectively interpret Judaism as a race or nationality, not just a religion..." Wrong, said people who actually read the order.



President Trump’s dangerous Twitter. That was the paper’s overriding obsession in Sunday’s edition. The enormous story launched on the top half of the front page and jumped to a special 10-page section, “The Twitter Presidency.” The timing is apt, considering the paper is pressuring Twitter to be better than Facebook and actually squelch political messaging as the 2020 campaign nears. One reason why Trump’s tweets are under attack was this line, which appeared in print over a graphic of 5889 little rectangle shapes representing Trump tweets (an undeniable wise use of time, energy, and ink): “Since he became president, the most frequent targets of his ire have been Democrats, investigations and the news media.”



The press has targeted Ken Cuccinelli for a long time, both when he was a conservative Attorney General for Virginia and now that he oversees immigration policy in the Trump administration. Loosening immigration is a major priority for the Times, so it’s no surprise they take their shot at Cuccinelli as well, in a large hit piece Friday. Zolan Kanno-Youngs and Maggie Haberman reported “The Public Face of Homeland Security Also Ruffles Its Feathers. A Lot.” The text box was accusatory: “Aggressively pushing policies with little concern for legalities."



The New York Times has learned its lesson on front-page headlines, making sure it injected plenty of anti-Trump context to lead its Thursday edition, after being vilified by the left for insufficient hostility toward Trump (and quickly changing a banner headline) on Tuesday. The headline over Thursday’s lead story posed no such danger to liberal groupthink, as it dutifully countered everything Trump did with a liberal rebuttal: “President Uses A Day Of Healing To Stoke Discord – Trip To Ohio And Texas – Trump’s Anger at Critics Eclipses His Gestures Toward Victims.”



The twisted tale of the students from Covington Catholic High School in Kentucky who encountered Native American activist Nathan Phillips back on January 19 took another turn on Thursday, when lawyers for the teenagers involved in the incident filed a defamation lawsuit in Kenton County Circuit Court against 12 of the “most egregious high-profile individuals.” The filing came just a few days after a federal judge dismissed a lawsuit on behalf of student Nick Sandmann that could have resulted in the Kentucky teen being awarded $250 million for defamation of character by the Washington Post.