President Trump’s dangerous Twitter. That was the paper’s overriding obsession in Sunday’s edition. The enormous story launched on the top half of the front page and jumped to a special 10-page section, “The Twitter Presidency.” The timing is apt, considering the paper is pressuring Twitter to be better than Facebook and actually squelch political messaging as the 2020 campaign nears. One reason why Trump’s tweets are under attack was this line, which appeared in print over a graphic of 5889 little rectangle shapes representing Trump tweets (an undeniable wise use of time, energy, and ink): “Since he became president, the most frequent targets of his ire have been Democrats, investigations and the news media.”



The press has targeted Ken Cuccinelli for a long time, both when he was a conservative Attorney General for Virginia and now that he oversees immigration policy in the Trump administration. Loosening immigration is a major priority for the Times, so it’s no surprise they take their shot at Cuccinelli as well, in a large hit piece Friday. Zolan Kanno-Youngs and Maggie Haberman reported “The Public Face of Homeland Security Also Ruffles Its Feathers. A Lot.” The text box was accusatory: “Aggressively pushing policies with little concern for legalities."



The New York Times has learned its lesson on front-page headlines, making sure it injected plenty of anti-Trump context to lead its Thursday edition, after being vilified by the left for insufficient hostility toward Trump (and quickly changing a banner headline) on Tuesday. The headline over Thursday’s lead story posed no such danger to liberal groupthink, as it dutifully countered everything Trump did with a liberal rebuttal: “President Uses A Day Of Healing To Stoke Discord – Trip To Ohio And Texas – Trump’s Anger at Critics Eclipses His Gestures Toward Victims.”



The twisted tale of the students from Covington Catholic High School in Kentucky who encountered Native American activist Nathan Phillips back on January 19 took another turn on Thursday, when lawyers for the teenagers involved in the incident filed a defamation lawsuit in Kenton County Circuit Court against 12 of the “most egregious high-profile individuals.” The filing came just a few days after a federal judge dismissed a lawsuit on behalf of student Nick Sandmann that could have resulted in the Kentucky teen being awarded $250 million for defamation of character by the Washington Post.



Over the last few days, President Donald Trump has used his Twitter account to go after Democratic Rep. Elijah Cummings and “civil rights leader” Al Sharpton. The New York Times could not resist, featuring not one but two front-page stories Tuesday, while egregiously calling the racially inflammatory Sharpton a “civil rights leader” and blotting out his past offenses against decency. The Times lead story led with the race card: "President Trump widened his war on critics of color on Monday with new attacks on the Rev. Al Sharpton and other political opponents."



For ten minutes, members of the powerhouse roundtable on Sunday’s edition of ABC's This Week did their best to paint President Trump as a racist. The conversation focused on the feud between President Trump and the four progressive Congresswomen known as “the squad.” According to the panel, President Trump’s treatment of the minority women serves as yet another of example of his inherent racism.



The media hastily have distanced themselves from their projections of street brawls and naked partisanship at the Salute to America event following a largely patriotic, unobjectionable July 4 speech by President Trump. Since TV news audiences are unlikely to hear talking heads acknowledge their numerous false predictions, here is a reminder of the worst of the bunch — ranging from the cynical to the absurd.



Like the rest of the media, CNN heavily hyped a tragic image of a drowned father and daughter trying to cross the Rio Grande river to enter the country illegally. On CNN’s New Day Wednesday morning, host Alisyn Camerota and John Berman brought on legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin and the New York Times’ Maggie Haberman, to pre-emptively condemn Trump for comments he hasn’t even made yet and bash him as responsible for the pair’s deaths.



Still more evidence that the New York Times will analyze everything Trump does only in the most cynical political terms, reporters Annie Karni and Maggie Haberman immediately put President Trump on the defensive by reducing his administration’s bipartisan criminal justice reform plan to raw political cynicism in Friday’s edition: “The White House Subject Was Criminal Justice. The Subtext was 2020.” It’s galling that the Times, after complaining for years of Republicans using tough-on-crime, gun-rights, anti-gay-marriage stances as “wedge issues,” are now calling reforming the justice system a “wedge issue”!



On CNN's New Day, New York Times reporter and CNN analyst Maggie Haberman said "Joe Biden's core strength is his decency," and claimed the Trump campaign is "having a very hard time figuring out how to attack that." We'll leave on the table whether the Avenatti-Stormy Network has the credentials to talk about anyone's "decency." But Haberman's phrasing is strange. Trump doesn't have trouble "figuring out" how to attack anyone. Maybe liberal reporters think the punches won't land, but he's going to punch.



On CNN's New Day on Friday, New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman worried out loud that Attorney General William Barr's investigation into the origins of the Russia probe might lead to selective leaks from intelligence agencies that carry a partisan narrative to hurt Trump's political opponents. The lack of introspection in this oration is stunning. On the radio Friday morning, Chris Plante laughed that the reporters were acting like this was "the Pentagon Papers, in reverse." Suddenly, the Forces of Transparency wanted to stop the disclosures! 



Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar’s latest disturbing comment, this time describing the 9-11 terror attacks dismissively as “some people did something....”, provided fodder for the New York Times to get offended. Not offended by Omar’s comment, of course, but against Donald Trump and New York Post for tough responses. Maggie Haberman and Sheryl Gay Stolberg tried to artificially widen Trump’s Twitter attack on Omar’s 9-11 comments into an assault on all Muslims in America on Tuesday’s front page: “Trump Rekindles Campaign Threat Of Islamic peril.” It began: "President Trump has often seen the political benefits of stigmatizing Muslims."