In Saturday’s New York Times, Noah Weiland and Maggie Haberman irresponsibly suggested coronavirus response coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx has hopelessly compromised her integrity for trying to remain on good terms with her boss, President Trump, in “For Trump Adviser, Urging Calm Has Come With Heavy Criticism.” The press is highly annoyed with Birx for trying to quell panic and doomsaying about the spread of the disease, with the liberal media defaulting to worst-case scenarios: "Dr. Birx’s comments casting doubt on talk of ventilator and hospital-bed shortages, and praising Mr. Trump’s attention to detail in lavish terms, have raised questions about her independence...."



The extra-large pack of journalists who equate liberalism and professionalism in their work product cannot stand that Fox News exists. They believe everything elected Republicans do should be effectively “fact checked” and routinely punished.  For Democrats, the elite media offer damage control; for Republicans, only damage. The onset of coronavirus is simply another occasion for the usual routine.



The New York Times is consumed with using the coronavirus crisis against President Trump, with Monday’s front-page “news analysis” mocking the very idea of presidential leadership during the pandemic in “Trump Shifts Image: Leader For ‘Wartime.’” Times reporters sneered: "This gambit, however, requires a rewriting of history -- Mr. Trump’s muted approach to the virus early on -- and it’s far from clear if many voters will accept the idea of him as a wartime leader." The paper even pumped up Joe Biden as a national savior.



As much as newspapers insist they merely "report," they write up a lot of wishful thinking about how the Republicans are sure to lose in the fall. Such was the case with New York Times reporters Maggie Haberman and Jonathan Martin aerobically rubbing a crystal ball on Thursday in "Trump’s Re-election Chances Suddenly Look Shakier."



More coronavirus bias from the New York Times, with congressional reporter-columnist Carl Hulse on Thursday, “A Sense of Emergency And Fear Can Become Powerful Political Tools,” pretending that only Republicans play partisan politics with potential pandemics. And Maggie Haberman and Annie Karni positively gloated in a “news analysis,” “A Bad Week for the President, Made Worse by Biden.”



The New York Times used the coronavirus story as a carrier for the same Trump-bashing that infects the paper like the common cold. Thursday’s edition led with the banner headline, “Trump Taps Pence To Lead As Virus Spreads.” Underneath was “news analysis” by Annie Karni, Michael Crowley, and Maggie Haberman, “Facing Potential Test in Public Trust, Too.” They led with Trump’s silly “Sharpie” moment during Hurricane Dorian, then quickly raised the stakes: "For years, experts have warned that Mr. Trump has been squandering the credibility he could need in a moment of national emergency, like a terrorist attack or a public health crisis."



The New York Times headline echoed its hostile lead story Wednesday: “Trump Exerts His Power With a Spree of Pardons – Critics Denounce Clemency for Blagojevich, Milken and Kerik as Undeserved” by Michael Shear and Maggie Haberman. Catch the echo of “crime spree” in the headline? "But the president’s announcements on Tuesday were mostly aimed at wiping clean the slates of rich, powerful and well-connected white men." But the Times took a different tone when it was Barack Obama making controversial pardons and commutations:



Media coverage of Sunday's Daytona 500 NASCAR race accused President Donald Trump of politicizing this huge sporting spectacle and using it as a campaign appearance. Whether it was the Associated Press, The Guardian, or New York Times, the disdain for both the President and the fan base was out in full force from the left-wing media.



The New York Times, which constantly lambastes Trump for spreading lies, is now critical of Trump for bringing actual news to public attention: “Trump, Once a Fan of Stop-and-Frisk, Uses It to Cudgel Bloomberg.” Notice the word choice in the online headlines: “Trump Takes On Bloomberg and Once Again Hijacks a News Cycle -- Like an assignment editor at a tabloid newspaper, the president poured accelerant on a negative story and got it trending on Twitter and cable news.” “Hijacks a news cycle” by pointing out controversial comments made by a potential rival?



New York Times Peter Baker’s lead-story “news analysis” on Tuesday suggested revelations from an unpublished memoir by Donald Trump’s former national security advisor, John Bolton, could be a Watergate-like “smoking gun” -- or at least would in normal political times.  Baker eagerly and perhaps prematurely made his “smoking gun” case: “John Bolton’s Account Upends Trump’s Denials, but Will It Upend Trump?”



While journalists live in their own media echo chamber most of the time, occasionally they’ll get a healthy dose of reality when they share their self-aggrandizing opinions on social media. That happened to New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman this past weekend when she whined about President Trump defending Iranian journalists against their totalitarian government.



The liberal media seem to only care about propping up billionaires when the views of the rich align with their own. The New York Times did an entire puff piece elevating the candidacy of liberal billionaire 2020 candidate Michael Bloomberg, with little criticism.