The Associated Press and the New York Times both tried to spin a Catholic archbishop's recent exposé about the Church's sex abuse scandal as an ideological attack on Pope Francis from the right. AP's Nicole Winfield touted how Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano turned to "ultra-conservative media that have been highly critical of Francis' mercy-over-morals papacy." The Times write-up highlighted how "some conservative American bishops swiftly came to Archbishop Viganò’s defense."



There was a recent outburst of respect for religion on two consecutive front pages of The New York Times, after Pope Francis changed the Catechism of the Catholic Church. The Times desperately desires to get religion out of politics when it comes to companies like Hobby Lobby that refuse on religious grounds to pay for birth control, eagerly embraces Christianity when it comes to leftist issues like global warming, immigration, and now the death penalty. Friday’s front page  excitedly reported: “Pope Declares Death Penalty Always Wrong – Doctrine Change Could Hit U.S. Hardest.”



New York Times religion reporter Laurie Goodstein forwarded “alarming” complaints from former Obama administration staffers and Islamic groups about Mike Pompeo, the current CIA director who is President Trump’s choice to become the new secretary of state, and John Bolton, Trump’s pick for national security advisor: “Alarms Raised On Nominee’s Views on Islam.” Goodstein even dredged up accusations of "modern-day McCarthyism."



President Trump, fulfilling a promise that other presidents have made but failed to keep, recognized Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and started the process of moving the American Embassy from Tel Aviv. Times reporters were predictably aghast, both downplaying Jewish ties to Jerusalem and warning of violence and endangement of the non-existent "peace process."



Are tax cuts anti-God? New York Times religion reporter Laurie Goodstein again celebrated a protest movement by the religious left (while chiding the religious right) in “50 Years Later, New Push to Magnify Plight of Poor.” The text box: “A plan to mount large protests on 40 consecutive days," keyed to the new tax bill that in Goodstein's words, "mainly benefits corporations and the rich."



Strange New Respect? New York Times religion reporter Laurie Goodstein celebrated the Mormon faith of fierce Trump critic Sen. Jeff Flake in Thursday’s paper. The online headline was the goopiest: “Flake’s Speech Bore Marks of Mormon Faith, Not Just Politics.” The text box was pretty gushy too: “In standing up to President Trump, standing ‘for what you believe in.’” Suddenly, the NYT approves of Mormonism! That’s quite a change from what the paper thought in 2012, when Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney put that religion in the spotlight.



Defending attempts by Democratic senators to issue a religious test to a Trump judicial nominee, New York Times religion reporter Laurie Goodstein filed a hit piece for Friday’s edition on Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s nominee to the U.S. Court of Appeals, Seventh Circuit: “Links to Religious Group Raise Issues for Nominee.” She wrote: "Legal scholars said that such loyalty oaths could raise legitimate questions about a judicial nominee’s independence and impartiality."



It happens every year in late January -- the annual March for Life, the 44th edition happening today -- around the anniversary of the Supreme Court decision Roe v. Wade that legalized abortion. It reliably draws to the nation’s capital tens of thousands of pro-lifers out into the winter cold, only to be virtually ignored by a paper that routinely gives out space to far sparser liberal protests. Yet January so far has actually brought a little bit of pro-life coverage. What will tomorrow's paper reveal about today's March for Life?



The New York Times has two standards when it comes to defying the rule of federal law – it’s great when it comes to left-wing causes like amnesty for illegals and sanctuary cities, awful when it comes to opposition to gay marriage. And while the Times is adamantly opposed to churches who dare to act on their opposition to gay marriage, churches can gain Strange New Respect from the paper for acting as sanctuary for illegal immigrants. Religion reporter Laurie Goodstein in Philadelphia made the top slot in Wednesday’s National section with “In Trump Era, Offering a Place Of Both Faith And Sanctuary.” The jump-page text box: “Houses of worship offer shelter and aid to undocumented immigrants.” No “illegal immigrants” in Times-land. And two other recent pieces underlined the double standard.



Whatever it takes. Wednesday’s New York Times saw the paper defending the incompetent Veterans Administration and praising “biblical imperatives,” all in the name of opposing Donald Trump. In “Harsh Critic of the V.A. May Become Its Leader,” by Dave Philipps, who often reports on the military for the paper. Became a fierce defender of the corrupt and incompetent federal agency and picked the odd target of Rep. Jeff Miller, considered by Trump to run the agency. The same day, religion reporter Laurie Goodstein took the biblical views of Catholic bishops seriously -- at least when they were criticizing Trump and calling for amnesty for illegals, two of the paper’s favorite hobbies.



Former president Jimmy Carter gave a lecture to journalists about racist Republicans and Trump supporters, and New York Times religion reporter Laurie Goodstein lapped it up religiously: “Seeing Resurgence of Racism, Carter Plans Conference to Promote Unity.” The text box to Tuesday’s story paraphrased Carter’s words of wisdom: “Saying the country has ‘reawakened’ in a bitter political climate.



The front page of Saturday's New York Times, next to the paper's already infamous front-page gun-control editorial, claimed that "Shootings in California Reshape the Campaigns." The language used by reporters Michael Barbaro and Trip Gabriel, was quite revealing. See how the Republican presidential candidates "angrily demanded...[rode a] rising tide of bellicosity... seethed with disgust for Democrats...Their language was almost apocalyptic..." Meanwhile they missed the "nuance" of Democratic gun-control proposals. And the paper's religion reporter Laurie Goodstein seemed to fear "Islamophobia" more than Islamic terrorism, though FBI stats show that anti-Semitic attacks are far more common.