The front page of Monday’s New York Times featured national political correspondent Jonathan Martin’s “news analysis” on the Democratic meltdown in Virginia, now involving both Gov. Ralph Northam and Lt. Gov Justin Fairfax: "Trump Behaves One Way on Race. Democrats Demand Better From Their Own.” Martin rather desperately tried to change the subject from damaging stories about a racist Democratic governor into a story about how quickly the Democratic camp tosses their own bad apples.



The Democratic Party kicked off Black History Month with a trip back to its racist roots with the controversy surrounding Virginia Governor Ralph Northam and a photo appearing to show him in either blackface or a KKK hood. He claims it wasn’t him although he did admit to wearing blackface in the past. As Democratic politicians and liberal media folks called on him to resign, a panel of journalists on CNN’s Inside Politics tacitly admitted that the calls were happening because the political timing was significant.



“Midwest Power Grab May Fuel G.O.P. Backlash,” blared the New York Times front page. Lambasting Republicans for post-election legislative maneuvering has been a drumbeat recently at the Times, providing momentum for Democrats to finish in 2020 what they started in the House in 2018. Elsewhere reporter Emily Badger cried racism in the first sentence of “Urban-Rural Divide At Center of Fight In Wisconsin Politics.”



Hypersensitive to any sign of Republican weakness, real or exaggerated, the New York Times used front-page space Monday to push political reporter Jonathan Martin’s “House G.O.P. Brushes Off Losses, Leaving Some Members Baffled.” The Democrats certainly had a good election in the 2018 midterms, gaining around 41 House seats (but losing two in the Senate) against a Republican president. But Republicans had an even better one in the 2010 midterms, gaining 63 House seats, and gaining six in the Senate against Democratic president Barack Obama. Between the losing Democrats in 2010 and the losing Republicans in 2018, guess which losing party the Times found to be more in mortal danger?



With elections fast approaching, Friday’s New York Times was packed with accusations of President Trump as a racist and hostile to immigrants, most intensely in the lead story by Michael Shear and Julie Hirschfeld Davis. The headline deck: “Trump Invoking ‘Crisis’ at Border As Voting Nears – Message For Midterms – A Presidential Theme Is Built Around a Fear of Immigrants.” Illegal immigrants, actually, but don’t count on the Times to ever clarify.



After a bizarre, early-presidential ploy by presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren involving a DNA test, the online headline over the New York Times story spun mightily on her behalf: “Elizabeth Warren’s DNA Results Put Trump on Defensive, but Also Raise Questions,” by Jonathan Martin. Martin tried to link Trump’s anti-Warren “Pocahontas” jibe to the tawdry “birther” issue, though in this case Trump’s mockery is based in fact.



The Sunday New York Times front-page “news analysis” was positively gleeful over the apparent certainty that the last-minute assault accusations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh would cost the Republican Party control of the House in November: “For Nominee, G.O.P. Takes A Big Gamble – Risking House Seats to Retain Senate Control.” It sounds like the GOP may as well pack it in right now. Of course, the Times dooms the Republicans in every election cycle – the issues may change (sometimes it’s immigration, sometimes abortion, sometimes Merrick Garland) but the hoped for result stays the same: Democratic victory.



Monday’s front page showed the New York Times will play every conceivable angle to push the Democrats over the top in the November elections. The latest line of attack: the Brett Kavanaugh nomination, and especially the long-delayed sexual assault accusation leveled against him. Reporter Jonathan Martin’s “G.O.P., Aiding Pick for Court, Risks Backlash -- Boon Becomes Possible Liability in Midterms,” sounded awfully familiar, as did the accompanying text box: “Staunch defense of a judge could come back to haunt the G.O.P.” Odd how everything seems to haunt the G.O.P. when elections are involved, though many of the ghosts strangely dissipate when the actual results come in.



Hope springs eternal for Democrats in the pages of the New York Times. Thursday’s lead story by Alexander Burns and Jonathan Martin provided Democratic predictions for winning the House in the November elections: “Clarity in Election Fog: Fall Holds Peril for G.O.P.” The reporters made hay over GOP struggles, and again exploited criminal charges faced by Rep. Chris Collins to make a pro-Democratic prediction. Other stories alternately pushed female candidates and mocked them, depending on party label.



The labeling bias came straight from the very top of the New York Times lead National section story Monday. Richard Fausset reported from Georgia under the headlines, “A Race Pivots on Guns, Saws and Trucks – In Georgia’s heated G.O.P. runoff, two candidates for governor court voters on the far right.” Fausset played up the controversies and heated rivalry in Georgia, while a story on the emerging Democratic 2020 presidential choices was sedate and politely headlined: “Warren Is Warming Up for 2020. So Are Many Other Democrats.”



The New York Times saw Red-state racism everywhere it looked, in Tuesday’s “Attacking Immigrants, Trump Keeps His Base Fired Up for the Midterms.” Reporters Jonathan Martin and Maggie Haberman went beyond the current border controversies to lump in the national anthem as a racist issue: "Mr. Trump’s broadsides against Hispanic migrants, like his criticism of black athletes who will not stand for the national anthem, may resonate in the deeply red states where the battle for control of the Senate is playing out."



After rustling the feathers of foreign elitists at the G7 summit in Canada over the weekend, President Trump hopped on Air Force One and shot over to Singapore for Monday’s historic meeting with North Korea’s Kim Jong-un. Of course, the liberal media was foaming at the mouth over Trump’s ability to push back against allies and the thought of something getting done with North Korea. The host of CNN’s Inside Politics, John King eagerly joined that bandwagon on Sunday and even said Trump was making Putin happy.