The passing of free market and libertarian activist David Koch on Friday was met by much of the media with a dignified reaction that highlighted Koch's politics, but without portraying him as the cause of all that is wrong with the contemporary political climate. MSNBC Live guest host Chris Jansing took a different route, instead choosing to label the "Billionaire conservative donor" Koch "as one half of the Koch Brothers came to symbolize the influence of dark money in America" and hype NBC's recently concluded docu-series American Swamp where the Koch Brothers are portrayed as the nefarious billionaires out to control American politics.



David Koch, the foremost of the businessmen, philanthropists, and libertarian activists known colloquially as the “Koch Brothers,” has died at 79. The New York Times marked his passing Friday by posting an obituary by Robert McFadden: “David Koch, Industrialist Who Fueled Right-Wing Movement, Dies at 79." The paper has long had a virulent hostility to the Kochs libertarian activism, and McFadden’s obituary for Koch is marred by bad faith and bad labeling. He has a history of hostile obits for conservatives, while showing reverence for liberal figures.



Longtime NPR Fresh Air host Terry Gross is completely In The Tank for Al Franken. Back in the Dubya years, we contrasted her giggly, tickly Franken interview with a very hostile Bill O'Reilly interview, where he actually stormed out of the studio. Gross is also a big fan of New Yorker writer Jane Mayer, so it's completely predictable that she awarded 43 and a half minutes of national taxpayer-funded radio time to Jane Mayer, who is now insisting Al Franken never should have left the Senate for apparently harmless sexual harassment. 



Liberal journalist fervor for the #MeToo movement comes packed with caveats and reservations when the target is Democratic politicians -- but it’s open season on conservative figures. Case in point: Former Washington bureau chief David Leonhardt’s Friday newsletter, which dealt with a New Yorker report by liberal journalist Jane Mayer -- a hypocritical defense of Al Franken, the former Saturday Night Live comic turned Democratic senator for Minnesota, who resigned after multiple allegations of sexual harassment, the most prominent from Leeann Tweeden, who had photographic evidence.



On Monday's CNN Tonight, host Don Lemon brought on two liberal guests, Hilary Rosen and Kirsten Powers, to talk about Franken and whether or not he got "railroaded," and didn't get due process. Lemon kept asking if Democrats "jumped the gun" and play by an "outdated set of rules" while Republicans won't pressure Trump to resign for sexual harassment charges.



The Washington Post’s Paul Farhi broke news Wednesday afternoon that the Democratic National Committee would be banning the Fox News Channel from hosting a 2020 presidential primary debate in light of the rabidly anti-Fox hit job by The New Yorker’s Jane Mayer. Of course, the DNC has a fan of the move in CNN’s Reliable Sources host Brian Stelter because Democrats are “dehumanized” and “attacked relentlessly” on FNC’s primetime shows.



Eager to promote an anti-Fox News hit piece in The New Yorker, on Tuesday, MSNBC anchor Andrea Mitchell brought on the liberal magazine’s chief Washington correspondent Jane Mayer to tout some of the article’s most salacious accusations of pro-Trump bias at the rival cable news channel. Lacking any sense of irony, the two Democratic activists masquerading as journalists were aghast at the idea that a media outlet would help a politician with slanted coverage.



CNN and MSNBC were all aglow after Jane Mayer wrote a snide article in The New Yorker magazine titled “The Making of the Fox News White House.” The thesis was that Fox News and President Trump are very tightly aligned, starting with the fact that Fox News executive Bill Shine revolved from Fox into running the White House communications operation. That’s a fair subject for analysis. What quickly turns into hilarity is the notion that it’s unprecedented.



During the first hour of MSNBC's Morning Joe on Monday, the hosts brought on Jane Mayer of The New Yorker to talk about her latest article "The Making of the Fox News White House."  Mayer's article of nearly 11,500 words provided the morning show a chance to take some swings at their competitor.



Remember back when a solid sense of skepticism was considered a prerequisite for working in journalism? Looks like that ethos is long gone and discarded. Speaking with former U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara about her hit piece on then-Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, New Yorker writer Jane Mayer came across as revealing a bit more than intended.



Jane Mayer made the network rounds, this week, promoting her New Yorker hit piece on Brett Kavanaugh, but a look at her past demonstrates why her work should be taken with biggest grains of salt as she has become a go-to author for partisan attack stories. 
 



Washington Post media reporter Paul Farhi wrote a September 25 article on liberal media bias headlined “Kavanaugh supporters see a conspiracy afoot.” The Post painted this as a little crazy, like a UFO was involved. Can anyone imagine the idea of the Democrats and liberal reporters working hand in glove to torpedo a Republican nomination? Yes, we've seen it over and over again.