After hosting the first two-night debate of Democratic candidates at the end of June for the 2020 presidential election, CNN decided to add some drama to the process of selecting participants for the second round, which will take place on July 30 and 31. That choice drew fire from James Poniewozik, chief television critic for the New York Times, who slammed the selection as giving the Thursday night program “the appearance of a Powerball drawing and just as much depth.”



James Poniewozik, the New York Times’ chief TV critic, ran a fevered attack on three recent works -- two television shows and a play -- that render media mogul Rupert Murdoch and his outlets, including the Roger Ailes-led Fox News, in unflattering terms. The headline hid the inflammatory nature of the text: “Rupert Murdoch and Roger Ailes Gave Us Fox. These Shows Try to Make Sense of It All – ‘The Loudest Voice,’ ‘Ink’ and ‘Succession’ map out the influential world the two men created.” With the media and entertainment culture almost monopolized by the left save for Fox News, it’s Fox that somehow represents an ideological danger.



New York Times television critic James Poniewozik is a big fan of the anti-Trump content of the CBS All Access drama The Good Fight.On Monday morning, he tweeted that the show's snarky Schoolhouse Rock-style cartoons are "the best minute of television in any given week." He linked to a YouTube video of a nasty Melania cartoon that appeared in the April 18 episode.



Reading James Poniewozik’s New York Times review of Brexit, airing on HBO and starring Sherlock’s Benedict Cumberbatch as a consultant for the successful “Leave” movement, it’s clear he isn’t a fan of the choice British voters made in June 2016 (neither is anyone else at the paper). Poniewozik has a pattern of rating shows and movies based on how anti-Trump or politically correct they are.



NBC morning host (and former Fox News host) Megyn Kelly controversy is seemingly out at the network, after a politically incorrect discussion of Halloween costumes and so-called cultural appropriation caused outcry -- not at the puzzling phenomenon of liberals demanding Halloween costumes be policed, but at a clumsy comment Kelly made that was quickly spun as racist. The most hostility toward Kelly (and her former employer Fox News) came from the paper’s television critic James Poniewozik: “Host’s Demeaning Words Serve as Clumsy Rerun of Racially Insensitive Past.” He even compared Kelly's remarks to "tiki torches" at the Nazi march in Charlottesville.



The New York Times gave vastly different views of Brett Kavanaugh and Christine Blasey Ford regarding their extraordinary testimony, consistently chiding Kavanaugh as "angry" and "aggrieved" and calling his judicial temperament into question -- as if anger wouldn't be a perfectly reasonable response to false allegations of sexual assault. The paper was clearly disappointed with Sen. Lindsey Graham for his fierce attacks on Democrats.



After Roseanne Barr lost her hit show over a tweet, the blurb introducing television writer James Poniewozik’s report was morally convicting: "....when people decide to let racism slide, it costs the rest of us." A shame the Times chose not to apply that maxim to itself. Fast forward to the controversy over the paper’s hiring of Sarah Jeong to write about technology for the paper’s editorial board. Hours after the announcement came revelations from Jeong’s obsessively anti-white and anti-police ravings on Twitter, and a defense of Jeong’s hiring from the paper.



There’s nothing quite so rare as a “fair and balanced” media take on entertainment and politics. For proof, look no further than CNN, which missed the mark. For proof, look no further than CNN, which missed the mark. During a special report, aired on July 20, titled The Trump Show: TV’s New Reality, CNN host Brian Stelter, New York Times critic James Poniewozik and Salon critic Melanie McFarland talked to television producers and actors about the rise of Trump TV and its significance.



The Kennedy Center Honors are packed with traditions that involve the President of the United States. This year, at least four liberal honorees will be forced to associate in some way, shape, or form, with their favorite Republican of all time: President Donald Trump.

 



Television critic James Poniewozik was featured on the front of the New York Times Arts section on Tuesday with another look by the paper at the “newly relevant” Hulu version of the feminist dystopian novel “The Handmaid’s Tale.” The Trump-baiting headline: "Making Dystopia Fresh Again -- Drawing on an Atwood novel that feels newly relevant." And another bogus lefty reference to current events is snuck in: Offred is a captive. Nevertheless, she persists...."



The New York Times’ John Koblin made the front of Business Day Monday with yet another fawning article from the NYT about how the Trump presidency has given a liberal television comedian a new lease on ratings popularity: “How Colbert Finally Got on a Roll.” It’s basically the same article the Times has been running for two months:



President Trump’s first address to a joint session of Congress was analyzed live by an assortment of NYT journalists. Glenn Thrush, a Politico alum now with the New York Times, stood out as more partisan than the other journalists, which is pretty tough. And Times politicized television critic Jamie Poniewozik saw dark, possibly violent anti-immigrant fear-mongering behind Trump’s positive tone.