Appearing on MSNBC’s 9:00 a.m. ET hour on Wednesday to sell his latest Trump-trashing book, left-wing author David Cay Johnston compared the current administration to an insect infestation that was “eating away at the structure of our government.” He apparently saw himself as the exterminator ready to stamp out the supposed political parasites.


Throughout President Donald Trump’s campaign rally in Phoenix, Arizona on Tuesday, MSNBC’s The Last Word would break away from the live video in order to do on-the-fly commentary, which often included attacking the President on what he was saying. Towards the end of the of the 10 o’clock hour, host Lawrence O’Donnell left the Trump rally behind to really give his stacked liberal panel a good go at Trump and his supporters.


On Thursday’s edition of the Fox Business Network’s Risk and Reward, the Media Research Center’s Tim Graham ripped MSNBC host Rachel Maddow and her epic fail regarding Trump’s 2005 tax return, equating it to “a Dixie cup full of sea monkeys” instead of “slay[ing] the sea monster.”


MSNBC host Rachel Maddow may be an object of mockery, even among her liberal media colleagues, for breathlessly hyping (and then endlessly milking) a “big scoop” about Donald Trump’s tax returns Tuesday night. The big leak turned out to be a two-page 1040 form from 2005, showing that Trump paid $38 million in income taxes that year. Even Slate headlined it a “Cynical, Self-Defeating Spectacle.”


Yes, you read that headline correctly. Leading off his eponymous talk radio show on Wednesday, conservative stalwart Rush Limbaugh lambasted MSNBC host Rachel Maddow and “lunatic” far-left journalist David Cay Johnston over the pathetic release of President Trump’s 2005 tax returns, declaring “they got schlonged” and blinded by their hatred for Trump.

 


The reporter who was lauded by the media for sharing Trump’s boring 2005 tax return is not getting much attention for his politics but perhaps he should be. While the networks Wednesday morning described David Cay Johnston as a “Pulitzer Prize winning reporter,” they apparently didn’t notice that he was a hardcore liberal as well.


On CNN's New Day Wednesday, the investigative reporter who revealed President Donald Trump's 2005 tax returns, cried foul over the White House leaking them to news organizations, accusing them of behaving "unethically," and that the public doesn't know how much the President is "getting from the Russian oligarches." He also said the former point a few hours later on MSNBC Live with Stephanie Ruhle. Moreover, Johnston ranted in his CNN interview about other aspects of Trump's returns.


The morning after President Trump’s 2005 tax returns were leaked to the press, the media eagerly reported on the returns, speculating whether there was more to the story than the documents revealed. ABC’s George Stephanopoulos even interviewed the journalist who first reported the story Tuesday night on MSNBC, asking him what Trump could be “hiding” in the benign report.


It didn't take long for CNN to expose its bias against President Donald Trump's 2005 tax returns. At the top of the first hour of CNN's New Day on Wednesday, reporter Suzanne Malveaux said, "The release of President Trump's 2005 taxes raises more questions than answers like whether he skipped out on paying his fair share of taxes more recently."


Late Tuesday evening, MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow sent out an enticing tweet declaring that she would expose newly authenticated copies of President Donald Trump’s 2005 tax returns. As her show aired and the White House put out their official statement, it became clear that the hype was much to do about nothing. The revelation that Trump made roughly $150 million and paid $38 million in taxes fell so flat that the panel of Anderson Cooper 360 laughed about how good it made Trump look, with one saying it wasn’t “explosive” at all. 


On Tuesday night, one of the crazier news nights since Election Day occurred when MSNBC host Rachel Maddow failed on a level akin to Geraldo Rivera and Al Capone’s vault when she falsely claimed to have a bombshell exclusive (that wasn’t hers) in the form of President Trump’s 2005 tax returns.


On Christmas evening, appearing in print on Sunday, December 26, Jeremy Peters at the New York Times pretended that the term "fake news" has only gained common currency very recently during the social media era. He also effectively contended that the establishment press holds ownership rights over the term, claiming that "conservative cable and radio personalities, top Republicans and even Mr. (Donald) Trump himself ... have appropriated" it.

Peters, who graduated from the University of Michigan in 2002 and arguably knows better, could not be more wrong. Center-right media critics, pundits and personalities have used the term "fake news" to describe establishment press reporting for at least a decade, usually with total justification. It's the press which is "appropriating" the "fake news" term in the name of marginalizing and silencing non-"mainstream" news sources.