Appearing as a guest during Sunday's MSNBC live coverage of the Paris terrorist attacks, Daily Beast Foreign Editor Christopher Dickey declared that "I'm afraid" that the right wing in Europe "will continue to be on the rise" in the aftermath of the attacks.



During Saturday morning's live MSNBC coverage of the Paris terror attacks, Daily Beast Foreign Editor Christopher Dickey worried that "the right wing politicians" in France "are going to do their best to take advantage of it and probably successfully to further divide this country," leading host Tamron Hall to recall concerns that a "tsunami of hatred may await Muslims."



It's not enough to read the transcript.  You really need to view the video to appreciate the depths of Christopher Dickey's world-weary, dismissive, preening political correctness. Asked on today's Morning Joe to comment on Muslim preachers inciting violence from their pulpits, Dickey of The Daily Beast sniffed that the problem is "exaggerated," claimed that the number of violent Muslims is "infinitesimally small" [down even from the "minuscule" number he cited last week], and engaged in the most fraudulent form of moral equivalency, saying that there are also crazy Christian, Jewish and Hindu preachers who incite their congregations.



In the midst of MSNBC’s coverage on the aftermath of the dual hostage situations in France that resulted in three terrorists being killed, MSNBC terrorism analyst Evan Kohlmann railed against the “openly racist,” “prejudice[d],” and “hateful” National Front party in France as being “as much of the problem as jihadists are” for the country.

Following the airing of a speech by French President François Hollande, MSNBC’s Chris Hayes brought up the plans for a national unity march in Paris on Sunday that would feature all political parties with the exception of the National Front, which is currently led by Marine Le Pen.



For the second time in 24 hours, MSNBC featured former Newsweek columnist Christopher Dickey to worry about how the "far-right" will exploit the terrorist shooting in France.



If 16% of American conservatives supported suicide bombings and other violence against civilian targets, do you think the MSM would characterize that proportion as "minuscule" and fret that other conservatives were being "stained" as a result?

Yet on today's Morning Joe, there was Christopher Dickey, the Daily Beast's foreign editor, describing as "minuscule" the proportion of Muslims in France who support yesterday's kind of violence. Dickey worried that other Muslims in France will suffer a resultant "stain." But is the proportion truly "minuscule?"  A Pew poll from 2007 found that 16% of Muslims in France support suicide attacks and other violence against civilian targets at least sometimes, including 6% supporting such attacks "often."  With about six million Muslims in France, that potentially represents hundreds of thousands of people.



On the day that 12 people were murdered for publishing satirical cartoons about Islam, Daily Beast foreign editor Christopher Dickey on Wednesday fretted about how the "extreme right" of Europe played a role in increasing the conflict with Muslims.



In the rush to heap praise on President Obama's move to normalize diplomatic relations with the totalitarian Castro regime in Cuba, Daily Beast headline writer effused, "Obama Smarter Than 10 Presidents on Cuba."



Does the Daily Beast have an Anger Management program for its writers? If so, then Christopher Dickey is in dire need of that service.

The fire-breathing Dickey is apparently so full of hate that he attacks political groups he disagrees with even when writing on completely unrelated topics. Take for example the subject of Robert E. Lee. Even though the Confederate general died almost 150 years ago, Dickey manages to twist his Daily Beast book review about him into an attack on the Tea Party that is chock full of hate. Think I exaggerate? Even the title of fire-breather Dickey's book review is How I Learned to Hate Robert E. Lee. We shall skip over most of Dickey's hate to concentrate on the portion of his book review that focuses on his hatred of Tea Party supporters:



While reporting on the sexual assault case against International Monetary Fund Chairman Dominique Strauss-Kahn on Tuesday's Today, NBC correspondent Jeff Rossen noted how the would-be Socialist Party candidate for the French presidency had "worried his political opponent, current French President Nicolas Sarkozy, would try to frame him with a fake rape..."

Rossen further added that Strauss-Kahn once told a French newspaper that the rape victim would be "promised 500,000 or a million euros to invent this story" by Sarkozy. Following Rossen's report, correspondent Michelle Kosinski highlighted French outrage over Strauss-Kahn's arrest: "I would say that the reaction ranges from disbelief to outright disgust. To see their VIP paraded before cameras, the socialists are calling it 'inhumane'....they're saying that this looks like a humiliating public exhibition like something from ancient times."
                        
The headline on screen during the segment read: "French Conspiracy Theories; Was Banker Set Up as Part of Political Plot?"



"The State Department has issued a "travel alert" for Europe—underscoring the effect Muslim-bashing politicians have had on the terror threat on the continent," reads the subheadline to an October 4 Newsweek story by Christopher Dickey and Sami Yousafzai.

In "Turn On the Red Light," Dickey and Yousafzai went so far as to suggest that anti-Islamist politicians like the Netherlands' Geert Wilders actually wanted to goad radical Islamists into violent acts (emphasis mine):



The crisis in Georgia is all Bush's fault, the Republicans offered America a soft-pedaled version of George Wallace's racism, and Obama-voting Southern Democrats are intelligent, defiant people living in occupied territory. I learned all that from just one Newsweek column.

I may have to watch "The View" to earn back some I.Q. points.

Yes, Christopher Dickey enlightened Newsweek readers on "The Defiant Ones," his August 14 Web exclusive, the subheader of which noted that:

The Russia-Georgia conflict is yet another example of why a leader caught up in the romance of resistance should not rely on Washington. What Saakashvili should have learned from history--and the American South.

According to Dickey, the real problem is America and its ally, Georgia, a partner in coalition forces in Iraq, not Vladimir Putin's Russia.

So where does the American South come in? Dickey's thread ran from the nation of Georgia to the Peach State by examining the psychology of defiance (emphasis mine):