Reacting to Rachel Dolezal’s interview with MSNBC during which the former Spokane NAACP president claimed to identify as black, CNN brought on Charles Blow of the New York Times and cultural critic Michaela Angela Davis to discuss the situation. They both dismissed the idea that Dolezal could identify as black, saying it represents white privilege. 



The New York Times, having feasted for days on remarks made by former New York City Governor Rudy Giuliani at a private dinner for Scott Walker, is now switching targets to Walker himself.



The New York Times's Charles Blow faced off with conservative Dan Bongino on CNN's AC360 on Wednesday over whether an inherent racial "bias" against blacks in American society fed into the controversial case of a NYPD officer choking Eric Garner to death during an arrest. Blow claimed that "society...acculturates us to fear, and...that is how the whole justice system becomes corrupted and biased....we are not always even aware that we have the bias." Bongino, ripped the liberal writer's claims as "utterly absurd."



The Supreme Court's recent surprise decision to take up King v. Burwell, a challenge to the Affordable Care Act, sent former New York Times Supreme Court reporter Linda Greenhouse on another aggrieved liberal rant against the conservative-dominated Court. Greenhouse failed to mention Obama-care architect Jonathan Gruber's inconvenient gaffes in several clips boasting about the deceitful selling of the program and crediting the "stupidity of the American voter" for its successful passage



Areva Martin brought in the specter of Jim Crow on Monday's Anderson Cooper 360 on CNN, as she commented on the child abuse case against NFL player Adrian Peterson. Martin contended that "corporal punishment, in any form, is abusive," and emphasized, "We used to not wear helmets when we rode bikes. Women used to smoke when they were pregnant. We used to send our kids to segregated schools. So, there are a lot of things we did twenty and thirty years ago that we now know are hurtful and harmful."



During a segment on Tuesday evening's edition of The O'Reilly Factor, the Fox News Channel host stated he “does not, does not believe in white privilege. However, there is no question that African-Americans have a much harder time succeeding in our society than whites do.” [video below the jump]

Those assertions led Charles Blow, a columnist for the New York Times, to ask in his Thursday column “Is white privilege real? Not according to Fox News’s Bill O’Reilly.” The black writer also criticized the cable news host by declaring: “It is statements like this ... that make you the race hustler.”



The hypersensitive leftists who screamed in social media at The New York Times over using the term “no angel” to describe Michael Brown after he was shot dead in Ferguson ought to read Washington Post media blogger Erik Wemple.

Wemple took the “no angel” term into a Nexis search of the Times archives and found that somehow black columnist Charles Blow wasn’t Twitter-harassed when he described convicted killer Clayton Lockett (also black) as “no angel,” underlining that the term can be a way of clearing the throat on the way to sympathy, a "yes, but" and not a vicious insult:



The reluctance of abortion-rights advocates to call the procedure by its name, and their preference for euphemism, is legend.

To the euphemistic lexicon of "pro-choice," "women's health," "reproductive freedom," etc. ad nauseum, Charles Blow has made the latest contribution.  His New York Times column of today speaks of Republican candidates opposing "a full range of reproductive options for women." More after the jump.



Sunday brought an overload of New York Times columnists, including former reporters, calling the previous week's Republican National Convention a celebration of lies and extremism on abortion and gay marriage.

Times columnist and former White House correspondent Maureen Dowd was given more room than usual to rant about Paul Ryan and the Republicans in her Sunday column, "Cruel Conservatives Throw a Masquerade Ball." After calling the Republican Convention "a colossal hoax," she said of Paul Ryan's speech, "the altar boy altered reality, conjuring up a world so compassionate, so full of love-thy-neighbor kindness and small-town goodness, that you had to pinch yourself to remember it was a shimmering mirage, a beckoning pool of big, juicy lies...." Dowd concluded that "....Ryan’s lies and Romney’s shape-shifting are so easy to refute that they must have decided a Hail Mary pass of artifice was better than their authentic ruthless worldview."



During the 1960 presidential campaign, Democratic presidential candidate John F. Kennedy was attacked for his Catholic faith, then viewed by many as subversive and un-American. Anti-Mormon bigots are now targeting Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney for his Mormon beliefs, which are now viewed by many “progressives” as a “transparent and recent fraud.” But in those 50 years, the role of the media has changed significantly.

June 2012 study performed by American National Election Studies (ANES) found that 43 percent of liberals would be “less likely” to vote for a Mormon candidate for religious reasons. An essential point, given how often news outlets highlight Romney’s religion.



"This man does not have a soul. If you opened up, you know, his chest, there's probably a gold ticking watch in there and not even a heart. This is not a person. This is just a robot who will do whatever it takes, whatever he's told to do, to make it to the White House."

So said New York Times columnist Charles Blow about presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney on MSNBC's The Last Word Tuesday (video follows with transcript and commentary):



On Thursday's edition of the New York Times's daily TimesCast, liberal columnists Charles Blow and Bill Keller discussed Mitt Romney's appearance at the NAACP convention (which Keller, the paper's former executive editor, found condescending).

They took on the issue of voter ID laws in various states. Over a montage of still photos of blacks in line to vote, Keller called voter fraud "kind of a tiny problem comapred to voter participation." Blow one-upped Keller, saying "not just a tiny problem I mean, it's minuscule."